How to download, navigate your Twitter archive

Here's how to request, download, and browse through your Twitter history. Be careful, though -- you may not like what your first tweets look like.

Last month Twitter announced it was officially rolling out its Twitter archive feature to users. The feature, one Twitter users have been asking for, allows you to browse every tweet you've ever sent. Twitter is rolling out the archive feature slowly, with the full rollout expected to take months to reach all users across all supported languages.

Here's what you'll need to do:

  • To see if your account has the archive feature enabled, log into your account and navigate to Settings. Scroll down the bottom of the page.
  • If your account is one of the lucky few, you'll see a new "Your Twitter archive" section. Here you can then request your archive with the click of a button. An e-mail containing a link to your archive will be sent once Twitter has your archive ready.
  • Follow the link in the e-mail and download the ZIP file.
  • Open the ZIP file, then double-click the index.html file. Your browser will launch and you'll have every tweet you've posted laid out in front of you in a month-by-month fashion.

The video above walks you through each step described above, including a look at how to navigate your archive once you have it.

Does your account have the Twitter archive feature yet? If so, how much has the way you use Twitter changed from your first tweet until now? What about the most embarrassing tweet you forgot you sent? Let us know in the Comments section below.

About the author

Jason Cipriani has been covering mobile technology news for over five years. His work spans from CNET How To and software review sections to WIRED’s Gadget Lab and Fortune.com.

 

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