How to create a quote bank

Writing a paper, e-mail, or even a note in a card can be perfectly complemented by the addition of a meaningful quote.

Keeping track of the awesome quotes you come across can be a tedious process. You could write them down and try to keep track of where you wrote them; or you could start a Word document dedicated to being a quote bank. While both of these options are possible, they're not as useful as Quick Quote. This open-source app will allow you to input the quotes you love and easily search through them when it's time to use one.

Step 1: Download Quick Quote from Sourceforge and extract the RAR file to a convenient location.

Tip: You can place these files on a USB drive, which will allow you to use the app on any computer with a USB port.

Screenshot by Nicole Cozma/CNET

Quick Quote has a fairly simple interface, focusing more on functionality than beauty. The search feature will allow you to look at quotes by their author, title, tags you added, and date. The split pane will show the content of the quote on the left and the title and author on the right.

Screenshot by Nicole Cozma/CNET

Step 2: Click File and then New Quote. You can also press Ctrl+N.

Screenshot by Nicole Cozma/CNET

Step 3: Enter all of the information for your quote. The name textbox is for the name of the work, or a name you want to assign to the quote. As for date, you can choose to use the date of the work the quote came from, or today's date if you're collecting quotes for a paper.

Screenshot by Nicole Cozma/CNET

(Optional) Step 4: To find one of your quotes, simply put in the tag, title, author, or date. Results will appear in the right-hand pane; double-clicking on a result will display the quote on the left.

Tip: You can select and copy text from the area on the left to make using the quote easy.

If you ever need to remove a quote, you can search for it and then choose Delete Quote from the File menu. The app does allow you to edit quotes if you made a typo, but this can be a little buggy so it's better to just start fresh. 

(Via AddictiveTips)

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About the author

Nicole Cozma has an affinity for Android apps and devices, but loves technology in general. Based out of the Tampa Bay Area, she enjoys being a spectator to both sunsets and lightning storms.

 

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