How to answer Android calls with a shake

For most people, the Android's default swipe-to-answer feature works out well. Some of us--those with fat fingers, shaky hands, or poor vision--need something different. ShakeCall is a free app that lets you answer and drop calls with a quick shake of the phone instead of a swipe. Learn how to use it in this blog post by Rob Lightner.

If you've ever missed a call on your Android phone thanks to a failed swipe, you're likely looking for alternatives. ShakeCall is a great, free app that lets you answer and drop calls by shaking your phone, and it's easy to set it up so you can't accidentally answer or (worse) drop a call from a tiny bump. Here's how to switch over: 

  1. Install the ShakeCall app from the Android Market
  2. Open it up to show your options and get started. Select "Setup the Shake Version" first and then select "Ver2(v1.2.*)," which is correct for most phones. (If it doesn't work with your older phone, try the other option.)
    Step 2: Set up Shake Version.
    Step 2: Set up Shake Version.
  3. Now you need to set the shaking intensity to trigger accepting calls. You want it to be strong enough that you don't answer that telemarketer just by lifting the phone to eye level, but weak enough that you don't pull a muscle answering your calls. Experiment a bit to see what feels natural to you. 
    Step 3: Set up shaking intensity.
    Step 3: Set up shaking intensity.
  4. Beneath that, make sure to check "Shaking to receive call." You may want to select "Shaking to disconnect call" as well, but I find that the disconnect button works just fine for me, so I don't use this feature. 
  5. Further down, you can set up the proximity sensor so that you can answer a call by moving your phone up to your ear, but I must confess that I couldn't get it to work with my Samsung Galaxy S. Your mileage may vary, of course.
  6. At the very bottom, you can select "Toast message" to bring a pop-up reminder to shake to answer your call when one comes your way and "Vibration" to add a buzz to your ringtone.
    Step 6: Set up toast message and vibration.
    Step 6: Set up toast message and vibration.
     
  7. The odds are good that you'll need to play around with the shaking intensity a bit before you test it with real calls, so try "Sensor Virtual Call Test" at the top until you're comfortable with the amount of shaking required to answer a call.
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About the author

    Rob Lightner is a tech and gaming writer based in Seattle. He has reviewed games, gadgets, and technical manuals, written copy for space travel gear, and composed horoscopes for cats.

     

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