Chrome: Read more with fewer clicks with HoverReader

Chrome extension HoverReader lets you hover over links to read the full text of articles.

When browsing the Web, you have to make a judgement with every link you encounter: to click or not to click. There aren't enough hours in the day to read every article you come across, which is why headline writing is such a fine or nefarious art, depending on the site or your viewpoint.

Chrome extension HoverReader takes some of the guesswork out of the to-click-or-not decision. With it installed, when you hover your cursor over a link, HoverReader opens a window with the full text of the article. With your cursor on the link (and not moved into the HoverReader window), you can then scroll through the text using your touchpad, mouse, or up- and down-arrow keys. When you move your cursor off of the link, the HoverReader window disappears.

hoverreader.jpg
Screenshot by Matt Elliott/CNET

On link-heavy sites, you might find HoverReader windows a distraction, but the extension installs quickly -- it does not require a restart of Chrome -- so there's little effort to give it a try. It installs a button to the right of Chrome's URL bar, but it does not offer any settings -- just a couple of tips along with a Donate button from the developer. To my eye, the font is too large in the HoverReader window; I wish there was a setting that allowed me to choose a smaller font size. Still, HoverReader provides a convenient way to preview articles quickly or read them in full without leaving your current page.

In my brief testing so far of HoverReader, I found it to work on a wide variety of sites. For the curious, there is a long but not exhaustive list of newspaper sites and blogs that it works with on the extension's page in the Chrome Web Store.

Via Lifehacker.

About the author

Matt Elliott, a technology writer for more than a decade, is a PC tester, Mac user, and amateur photographer based in New Hampshire.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Show Comments Hide Comments
Latest Galleries from CNET
15 crazy old phones from a Korean museum (pictures)
10 gloriously geeky highlights from 2014 (pictures)
2015.5 Volvo XC60: updated tech, understated design
Busted! CNET readers show us their broken devices (pictures)
Take a closer look at the BlackBerry Classic (pictures)