The best tech under $100

With our list of the best accessories under $25 and the best tech under $50, we've already shown that you can get some great gadgets without breaking the bank. Now we're raising the budget to $100 and choosing a new list of favorites -- including all of the products shown above.

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WakaWaka Power+ (Solar rechargeable power supply)

WakaWaka Power+ ($79) is a durable, water-resistant rechargeable battery/light that has a built-in solar panel, so you can charge up it up with a little help from the sun (it takes about 12 hours to charge in bright sunlight).

Alternatively, of course, you can charge it via USB. It charges a smartphone in about 2 hours and provides up to 150 hours of light on a single charge.

That's all well a good, but as an added bonus, there's a charitable element to WakaWaka. With every WakaWaka you purchase, the company sends a unit to "someone in need" somewhere on the planet.

WakaWaka Power+ is available at Amazon in 3 colors.

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Roku 3

The Roku 3 is our current top pick in the Internet media box category. It's the best overall choice for online streaming, with Netflix, Hulu Plus, HBO Go, Showtime Anytime, Amazon Instant, Vudu, Watch ESPN, Watch ABC, and -- finally! -- YouTube, plus literally hundreds of others. (Pretty much the only thing missing is iTunes; you'll need an Apple TV for that -- see the following slide.) The Wi-Fi remote -- which doesn't require "line of sight" to the player -- seals the deal.

Buy the Roku 3 at Amazon

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Apple TV

If you're a full-on Apple person -- an iPhone, iPad, or Mac owner, someone who already has lots of movies, TV shows, and music on iTunes, or who's really into iTunes Radio or iTunes Match -- Apple TV is a better choice than the Roku. And with the recent additions of the Watch ABC, Watch ESPN, Watch Disney, HBO Go, the Weather Channel, and free, live news channels like Sky News and Bloomberg TV, it's certainly a great deal -- but we'd recommend holding off for the next couple of months, since rumors of an updated box are becoming hard to ignore.

Buy Apple TV at Amazon

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GoalZero Lighthouse 250 lantern

GoalZero's rechargeable Lighthouse 250 lantern, which features 250 lumens of bright LED light, retails $79.99, but can be had for closer to $60 online.

You get anywhere from 2.5-48 hours of light, depending on the brightness level (yes, it's adujustable), and the lantern charges via USB and also has a USB port for charging your cell phone (its internal battery acts as an external battery charger).

If you're heading out to the wilderness, GoalZero does offer an optional solar-charging accessory. Alternatively, you can crank the built-in handle to self-charge the lantern, which gives you 10 minutes of light for every minute you crank.

Buy the GoalZero Lighthouse 250 lantern at Amazon

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Photo by: GoalZero / Caption by:

Cambridge SoundWorks Oontz XL

There are plenty of "good enough" Bluetooth speakers available, but nearly all of them are tiny portable models. The Cambridge SoundWorks Oontz XL, on the other hand, is a large portable on the scale of the Jawbone Big Jambox and the Jabra Solemate Max -- but (usually) available for under $100. (The iPhone 4S shown here on the left is to show the relative size of the XL.)

Buy the Cambridge SoundWorks Oontz XL at Amazon

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Klipsch Image S4i II

For iPhone owners who prefer to listen on the go, the Klipsch Image S4i II in-ear headphones are a great choice. (If you're buying for an Android owner, go with the otherwise identical Klipsch Image S4A II model instead.)

Buy the Klipsch Image S4i II headphones at Amazon

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Sony MDR-7506

An oldie, but a goodie. Despite being first released in the 1990s, the Sony MDR-7506s may well be the best-sounding headphones you can get for under $100. (Want more headphone options? Check out our list of best headphones under $100.)

Buy the Sony MDR-7506 headphones at Amazon

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Logitech Harmony 650

It's a few years old, but the Logitech Harmony 650 is still the best universal remote you can get for under $70 -- just be ready to invest some time and effort into programming it on your Mac or PC. (If you've got a slightly bigger budget, step up to the Logitech Harmony Home Control for $130 or less.)

Buy the Logitech Harmony 650 at Amazon

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Withings Pulse

Fitbit gets all the press, but the Withings Pulse may be the best fitness tracker you've never heard of. The $99.95 gadget monitors your steps, sleep, and even your heart rate.

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Amazon Fire HD 6

Its 8GB of internal memory (no, there's no expansion) is a little skimpy, but for $99, you're not going to find a better tablet.

Buy the Amazon Fire HD 6 at Amazon

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Klipsch r6i

The Klipsch r6i is a little bass heavy but tempers a bit with use and is quiet comfortable for an in-ear.

Buy the Klipsch r6i at Amazon

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JBL Flip 2

JBL's new Flip 2 carries a list price of $129.99, but costs around $99. It comes in a variety of colors and while it may look almost identical to company's original Flip wireless Bluetooth speaker, it's got some key upgrades that make it a better speaker.

Buy the JBL Flip 2 at Amazon

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Logitech X300

This is one of the better performing ultracompact Bluetooth speakers than you can pick up for an affordable price.

Buy the Logitech X300 at Amazon

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Parrot Minidrone Rolling Spider

Its battery life isn't great (flight times are short), but the Parrot Minidrone Rolling Spider won't break the bank and is relatively easy to operate.

Buy the Parrot Minidrone Rolling Spider at Amazon

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Samsung SL-M2020W

If you're looking for an inexpensive compact laser printer, the Samsung SL-M2020W is hard to beat for its low price of around $85.

Buy the Samsung SL-M2020W at Amazon

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Lensbaby LM-10 Sweet Spot Lens for Mobile

Lensbaby has shrunk down its special-effects lens and brought it to the mobile realm in a $70 package that our photo editor Lori Grunin found quite fun to use.

Buy the Lensbaby LM-10 Sweet Spot Lens for Mobile at Amazon

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Logitech Ultrathin Keyboard Cover for iPad Air

Logitech makes some of the best keyboard covers and case for iPads. Its Ultrathin Keyboard Cover, which indeed is quite thin, costs just under $100.

Buy the Logitech Ultrathin Keyboard Cover for iPad Air at Apple

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Seagate Backup Plus Slim

Everyone is sitting on a mountain of documents, photos, videos, and music. Even with cloud storage, you need a local backup -- and the Seagate Backup Plus Slim gives you 2TB of storage (that's 2,000GB) for $99 or 1TB for around $70.

Buy the Seagate Backup Plus Slim at Amazon

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Olloclip 4-in-1 Photo Lens (Galaxy S4/S5)

Olloclip makes nifty 4-in-lens accessories for iPhones and now Galaxy phones. They'll only set you back about $70.

Buy the Olloclip 4-in-1 Photo Lens at Amazon

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Check out best tech under $50 and under $25

If $100 is too rich for your blood, don't fret: we've also got lists of the best tech under $50 and the best tech accessories under $25, too.

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