Networking & Wireless forum

Question

Wireless repeating...

by JAROAM / January 23, 2013 12:13 AM PST

After a few years, I believe I actually got my two Netgear WGT624v4 routers to act as base-station and repeater. Nice. Seems that amidst their "help" people, online forum, site documentation, and even packed in literature, they all have differing ideas as to how to make it happen. And the sometimes broken-English doesn't help either, just sayin'.

Okay, great, so, calling any Netgear guru...or anyone else that may have a clue!

Why is it that now I have three networks showing when I scan for wireless networks?! There's my base-station "Chunky Puffs," my repeater (which somehow the procedure of making it a repeater decided on its own to call it) "Chunk," and then my plain ol' "Netgear" (which wasn't there before this procedure and can't be accessed period). So, is that all normal?

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All Answers

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Answer
1. Normal.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / January 23, 2013 12:19 AM PST
In reply to: Wireless repeating...

2. Why?

Well these are devices with a bazillion settings and can be used in many ways. I've lost count how many routers I've configured as a WAP but that wasn't your question.

I think the problem is that while I could answer how to do that in a paragraph the paragraph might only make sense to those that have been networking for about a year. I know I didn't know how to do this years ago.

So there it is. A technical product that does not come with full documentation for reasons we know but rarely write about. That is, head to a brick and mortar book store and marvel at the number of books on networking. To explain how this works may take a few books.
Bob

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Giggle...
by JAROAM / January 23, 2013 4:36 AM PST
In reply to: 1. Normal.

Ha! I don't doubt it! I dig why there're two network SSIDs showing, one for the main and one for the repeater (which in some scenarios, the instructions say to use the same SSID for both - but in my case I've found it doesn't matter and it will name it for you anyway so what's the point!), but I don't understand why the third is there, in my case the third is Netgear which you can't access anyway. Seriously, what the hell is that? If one is my base and one the repeater, why is that third one showing because it's not worth anything? Can it be turned off somehow or am I destined to always see it wondering why it's there?

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In some OSes.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / January 23, 2013 7:23 AM PST
In reply to: Giggle...

Not all, there is a setting like this "Show only preferred networks."

However you can imagine this makes a mess of what we need when you go to free WiFi hotspots.
Bob

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Argh...well, that was a false sense of accomplishment...
by JAROAM / January 25, 2013 12:01 AM PST
In reply to: 1. Normal.

Let this madness end! So after almost three days of bliss with my repeater actually repeating like it should, today I have nothing. It was working just fine for those three days and now even though I can see a signal from the router on my "available networks," it has no connectivity. Thoughts? Gee, and I thought I finally had it working.

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I can't diagnose that.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / January 25, 2013 12:04 AM PST

But if you find a cable to the WAN port of a router you want to be used as a WAP, you know to ask more questions.
Bob

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Channels?
by JAROAM / January 25, 2013 4:07 AM PST
In reply to: I can't diagnose that.

Depending on which set of instructions one chooses to follow, some say have them both on the same channel while others say have them on different. I had the base and the repeater on different channels, one 11 and the other 6. That was just fine for the three days everything was cool, until today of course. Now I have them both on the same, channel 11, and everything for now is copacetic. What the hell?! Does this mean in another couple of days I'll have to change it back or to something different or just throw them both out the window?

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Go with what works.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / January 25, 2013 6:22 AM PST
In reply to: Channels?

That rule rules them all. I have my setups that we use at the office and other places and if you are to support a system then you select or set the rules.
Bob

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What's the point?
by JAROAM / January 31, 2013 11:42 PM PST
In reply to: Go with what works.

Everything seems to be working just fine, as much as it can I suppose.

I've come to question the point of all this fuss. Seriously, just because I now have a supposed "stronger" signal on that half of the house, it doesn't mean things are going to download any faster or make Netflix give me a better shot at holding an HD quality video. It's the same as it ever was whether I'm connected to one side or the other. I guess I thought a more solid signal would mean faster and stronger. No! At least that's what I'm seeing right now.

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Strong signal does not mean clear signal.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / January 31, 2013 11:47 PM PST
In reply to: What's the point?

I've seen repeaters fail so often that the office won't deploy them. Sure, they are sold a lot but since we get the calls on what we install, we choose carefully.

A strong signal does not mean anything about quality. And if through a repeater, it is going to be about 1/2 the speed. Do you need to know why?
Bob

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Yes!
by JAROAM / February 1, 2013 4:22 AM PST

Do tell. Why is that?

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To repeat.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / February 1, 2013 5:19 AM PST
In reply to: Yes!

The repeat receives the packet at say 54Mbps. OK, it has to get the entire packet then resend that out the other radio. That's half the speed in that scenario.

If the system/protocol is to ack each packet then the ack goes the repeater, then it's relayed later back to the router.

A streaming video where packets are lost differs but most folk don't use or like that.
Bob

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Hmmm...
by JAROAM / February 1, 2013 5:44 AM PST
In reply to: To repeat.

Figured it was something like that. So then why is repeating a good idea? I guess it's really not.

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It's one of many solutions to get more range.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / February 1, 2013 9:43 AM PST
In reply to: Hmmm...

And by now you know that our office doesn't use it. We have powerline networking, routers as WAPs at the end of a long Ethernet cable (or the powerline bridge) so with so many solutions you can choose yours.
Bob

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Too many...
by JAROAM / February 3, 2013 11:53 AM PST

Yeah, too many, I may not care anymore. So what's an Extender going to do that making a router a repeater won't?

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Too many...
by JAROAM / February 3, 2013 11:31 PM PST
In reply to: 1. Normal.

Yeah, too many, I may not care anymore. So what's an Extender going to do that making a router a repeater won't?

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It may get more sales.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / February 3, 2013 11:33 PM PST
In reply to: Too many...

Let's say a client insists it be an "extender". We might have to get one of those with the right word on the box. There are no word police when it comes to labeling.
Bob

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Same thing?
by JAROAM / February 4, 2013 4:08 AM PST
In reply to: It may get more sales.

So what you're saying it that an Extender does the same thing as making a router a repeater, which as far as I can tell does nothing?

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That's a deep well.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / February 4, 2013 4:48 AM PST
In reply to: Same thing?

Well, it depends on the model. I'd have to compare 2 products to see if anything differs, but repeaters can extend and extends do have to repeat.
Bob

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Oop. I meand extender where you find the word extends.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / February 4, 2013 4:49 AM PST
In reply to: That's a deep well.

Call the word police.

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Answer
Possible an outside source
by sunwatcher / January 23, 2013 7:31 AM PST
In reply to: Wireless repeating...

It's possible you are picking up a different wireless network that does not belong to you. Netgear wifi routers are quite common and I believe "Netgear" is used as the default SSID, so it may belong to a neighbor of yours.

It's easy to test. Just turn off your own routers and see if the "Netgear" SSID remains up.

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It's mine...
by JAROAM / January 24, 2013 12:23 AM PST

Yes, it's mine all right. Strange why it's there. Maybe the routers feel left out of the naming process so they made their name known. Power to the routers!

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