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Wireless Cable modem VS Cable modem + Wireless router

by babubatla / June 29, 2008 2:31 PM PDT

I am planning to setup a Wi-Fi network at home. Is there any performance difference between a Wireless Cable Modem and a separate cable modem and wireless router?

I am currently looking for a Wireless Cable modem because it would be eliminate need of a separate wireless router and in essence avoid the wire-clutter.

The options I am currently looking at right now are:
1) Wireless-G Cable Gateway Cable Modem with Built-In Wireless-G Router
(http://www.linksys.com/servlet/Satellite?c=L_Product_C2&childpagename=US%2FLayout&cid=1138056788757&pagename=Linksys%2FCommon%2FVisitorWrapper&lid=8875745678B156)

2) Motorola SBG900 SURFboard Wireless 802.11g 54Mbps Cable Modem Gateway (http://www.directron.com/sbg900.html)

I have a Intel PRO/Wireless 3945ABG Network Connection - network adapter in my laptop and am running Vista Home Premium?

Would it be wise getting a combo or should I go for separate cable modem and wireless router?

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Stay away from the G
by Biggunna / June 29, 2008 8:02 PM PDT

The modem/router package isn't really a big concern unless you got to have both. I don't know who you got cable from but they usually give you a modem as part of the service, just plug that into the router. But I'm giving you a heads up on something else so you don't learn latter what I just did.

I have a cable set up with a standard issue modem and wireless 802.11"g" router. But after visiting with my buddy who has the exact same service with a 802.11"n" type router and adapter I'm grinding my teeth with connection speeds and the occasional dropped signal. Don't get me wrong it's good, but after seeing the potential I'm switching to n setup. Do yourself a favor and start looking for a 802.11n wireless router and make sure if you need them to get the same adapters which are becoming the standard. They are a little more pricey but worth the range and speed.

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Re:
by babubatla / June 29, 2008 9:48 PM PDT
In reply to: Stay away from the G

Thanks for the info, but wouldn't I need additional plugin or dongle for
the 801.11 N.???? Presently, I have a Intel PRO/Wireless 3945ABG Network Connection - network adapter.

I got the Mediacom internet/Cable TV coaxial cable in our apartment as included accessory. Would it be wise to go for separate modem and router or should I go for a combo?

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Your NIC
by samkh / July 1, 2008 2:03 AM PDT
In reply to: Re:

is compatible with N and G routers.

The biggest advantage of N is it's inherent MIMO (google it). That is what gets most people the distance and perception of speed, not the spec. If you have a rock solid connection even with 802.11b, you will think it's fast. There are MIMO G routers but for the minimal price diff, get an N.

Don't get the combo from your cable co. They will most likely (check w/cableco first) limit your ability to connect multiple PCs.

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G all good here.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / June 29, 2008 11:51 PM PDT

The N new stuff is fine too for the price. But here we don't copy files or see any diff when gaming so N gear is just paying for features we don't use.

The ALL IN ONE box is just dandy and one less part you have to maintain.
Bob

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Cable gateway
by Phil Crase / July 1, 2008 12:34 AM PDT

You could use what is called a CABLE GATEWAY, modem router combination or you could do a modem router separately, shop around see which is more cost effective an N series would be not a bad idea.

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Don't buy modem with built-in router!
by czgu / December 9, 2011 4:17 AM PST

Don't buy cable modem with built in wireless router. More high tech things in one box, more troubles you will get. I use AT&T DSL. 3 weeks ago, my DSL modem with wireless router couldn't connect to internet. I have to replace them all. Hundred dollar model/router only works 13 months. Now I use my old ADSL modem. It still works. I will switch to Comcast next week, and am going to buy cable modem and wireless router. Not two in one box.

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Olny certain brands work well
by Bacardiac / June 16, 2013 2:46 PM PDT

I have a Motorola Surfboard DOCSIS 3.0 Black Cable Modem, Model SBG6580. It is very fast and minimal up keep/ restart it. Until of late, I've owned it since it came out, it has been running slow and shotty connections. I do believe it is more efficient but I think if I had a good modem and a seperate router I would avoid the issue after owning it for two years, but then again it runs 24/7 and I live in a dusty area. Overall it is more cost efficient to buy the best combo because on average you'll pay around $120 more for the same results or better the the seperate modem and router.

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This old discussion is now closed.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / June 17, 2013 12:58 AM PDT

Old Thread Warning!

This thread is more than 1813 days old. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and replying to it will serve no purpose

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