Mac OS

General discussion

Windows to Mac: Why did you switch?

by Lee Koo (ADMIN) CNET staff/forum admin / December 16, 2011 8:05 AM PST
Note to members: this is a touchy subject and I would like to keep this discussion civil and productive. Please be nice and respectful of all opinions and experiences. If you cannot play nice, please don't participate at all. Thanks! -Lee

Question:

Windows to Mac: Why did you switch?


Hi everyone. I used a Windows OS since before Windows 95. I made the switch to Mac OS X in 2009. I started with an iMac (that I still own) and purchased a MacBook Pro in 2011. I also have several iOS devices, including an iPad. My experience with Mac OS X has been great. I confess that I do run Windows 7 in Boot Camp (and Parallels) because I have some programs/devices with no Mac OSX equivalent. My questions are mainly for those of you who switched from Windows to Mac (but I welcome all input). Why did you switch? What has been your level of satisfaction on a scale of 1 (low) to 5 (high). Do you use Boot Camp (or a virtualization program) and why? What have you done to make your Mac OSX experience more enjoyable (software, apps, hardware). Looking forward to your comments. Thanks.

- Submitted by Aaron J.


**** Below is a Thank you note from member Aaron J. and his contribution to the discussion ****

Hi Guys and Happy Holidays,

Thanks to all who responded. You really came through with some great information and viewpoints that also reaffirmed my decision to switch. As Lee asked, everyone played nice. A healthy exchange of information is always on message and of course there are no
wrong answers.

IMO the common thread (I took from your responses) or motivation to switch revolved around the need for a more reliable platform with better integration of the OS and software and fewer perceived problems (i.e. viruses, system freezes, BSOD etc). The advanced Mac hardware designs are an added bonus! Some of you use Boot Camp or have found other work-arounds to fill the Windows gap (Fusion or Parallels, Google Docs) and that's great. Your comments speak volumes about Steve Jobs concept that if a company controls all aspects related to design, software development, integration, manufacture and even deployment (Apple Stores) that the end result is a superior product that fosters a better customer experience and that's hard to argue against. On the other hand there are some whose experience with Mac OS X was not what they expected (or cannot justify a switch) and therefore will stay with a Windows platform and that's O.K. Life is about choices and what best meets our specific needs.

As I said there is a lot of great information to digest but I want to call your attention to a few posts in particular. High Desert Charlie (Function Doesn't Justify Cost) for his commentary that always keeps the ship from capsizing. PaxKahuna (Switch 2 Apple... Here's Why) and Waytron (Why Did You Switch To Mac?) for providing the professionals point of view to make us think before we leap. Nrkmann-2008 (Macs vs. PC TCO) for interjecting Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) as a way to justify buying an Apple product (or not) which although somewhat abstract is valid given the right circumstances. I know there are others worthy of mention so please read as many posts as you can.

My contribution to all of you is as follows:

• Mac's require maintenance just as PC's do but just not as often. I use CleanMyMac and Disk Warrior. Granted most of the functions performed by the products can be accomplished via Mac OS X Disk Utilities. However the programs mentioned
just make it easier. Lion OS X compatible.

• I also run Intego Internet Security Barrier X6 that includes a spam filter. Lion OS X compatible. While the number of Mac specific viruses and malware are very limited - they do exist. As the OS X platform becomes more popular the bad guys
will begin to target our beautiful machines. Also, running a Windows virtualization program (wherein you share Windows documents) opens your Mac to a cross-platform infection that may not harm your Mac, but could cause it to run slow.

• If you run Windows via Boot Camp (with IE, Adobe Flash, Outlook) that partition is vulnerable to Windows viruses, malware and spam. Therefore, I haveNorton Internet Security 2011 installed on my Boot Camp partition(s).

• Some of you are using Office for Mac and that's O.K. However, I encourage you to master iWorks. You can save an iWorks document in its Microsoft equivalent format if you need to send it to someone using a Windows PC. You can also export an
iWorks document to PDF if what you are sending does not require the recipient to have editing privileges.

In closing, I believe that Microsoft with its upcoming Windows 8 as a unified platform for all its future devices is an aggressive step in the right direction. IMO the success of Microsoft's Windows 8 (and future iterations) will be determined by how closely their
hardware and software partners are willing to work with them to share information and openly collaborate to build a superior product. I want Microsoft products to improve and continue to drive competition which in the long run is better for us all.

Conversely, Apple must continue to push the envelope as an innovator and offer products that justify the additional cost in a struggling economy so that their appeal is not lost to the average consumer. Additionally, seamless integration of Apple products across platforms/devices must continue to be a driving component of design and functionality. Finally, even with all the flash, razzle-dazzle, oohs and aah's associated with Apple products they must be practical and capable of going mainstream rather than devolving into a niche' market. That's all I have and Thanks again for participating!!

Together
Everyone
Achieves
More

Aaron J.

Note: This post was edited by its original author to add Aaron's thank you note to all contributors to his question on 12/20/2011 at 1:39 PM PT
Discussion is locked
You are posting a reply to: Windows to Mac: Why did you switch?
The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Please refer to our CNET Forums policies for details. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Track this discussion and email me when there are updates

If you're asking for technical help, please be sure to include all your system info, including operating system, model number, and any other specifics related to the problem. Also please exercise your best judgment when posting in the forums--revealing personal information such as your e-mail address, telephone number, and address is not recommended.

You are reporting the following post: Windows to Mac: Why did you switch?
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.
Collapse -
Switched in 2005 and Still Very Happy
by jeff1947 / December 16, 2011 9:56 AM PST

On a scale of from 1 to 5, it's clearly a 5. I'm still using the iMacG5 (PowerPC) purchased in 2005 with Leopard as my principal computer. (Yes, I know that I'll eventually have to upgrade, but I'm putting it off as long as possible.) We also have a 2006 Intel MacMini which my wife uses and a 2009 MacMini Server that we use as a media center with the TV as the display.

Collapse -
Get a new iMac!!
by Jabitabile / December 16, 2011 10:12 AM PST

Get the new iMac. The all in one units are power houses!! ( just as much power as the mac pro's)
Also your gonna love Lion (10.7)

Collapse -
I never Switched at all
by webserf / December 23, 2011 5:18 AM PST

Why switch? I have both IBM based office computers, and a MacBook Pro as my current laptop.
There are positives and negatives to both, that have been argued to death.

Here's what I love about my IBM based unit(s).
I love tweaking, and Windows based PCs allow more ways to configure, as well as more ways to use software. They are also prone to viruses because of the wide footprint of use.

Here's what I love about my MacBook:
Nearly trouble free use over 3 years. I've rarely needed to shut down to "clear" thing out etc..
But, there is less "to do" with a MAC. less things to tweak, and less choices in software.

So in short, there's no RIGHT answer. Both will do well to serve one's needs in computing and the ONLY reason to choose one over the other is in the very rare case of SOFTWARE, that might only run on one of the two, and given that fact, there are ways to overcome that as well, especially with Intel-based Macs.

We all know this question has been asked a million times, and a VERY long post could be written, but in this day, one can find peace in owing either one or BOTH!

Happy holidays all!

Collapse -
Switched in 2005 and Still Very Happy
by k1chapman / December 23, 2011 5:45 AM PST

<font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

Besides working in the PC world, a</font><span style="'font-family:" "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 11pt;'>ll off my
computers have been PC and I never seen a reason to switch to a MAC. Due to
the cost for the hardware and the lack of software, I have not look into buying
one. But with Fusion, I am starting to look. <?xml:namespace prefix =" o" ns =" "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office"" /><o:p></o:p>
<font size="3" face="Times New Roman">
</font><span style="'font-family:" "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 11pt;'>Apple has
one thing over all the other PC companies don't have, they provide both the OC
and Hardware. This makes for a more stable plate form.<o:p></o:p>
<font size="3" face="Times New Roman">
</font><span style="'font-family:" "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 11pt;'>With Fusion,
you are able to duel boot with both the MAC and PC OS. Besides the hard drive
space it takes, what other downsides would you have if you bought a MAC and
duel boot? <o:p></o:p>
<font size="3" face="Times New Roman">
</font>

Collapse -
What causes your reply to look like raw html?
by Justicegustine / December 23, 2011 8:00 AM PST

I see two Apple users with tags in the replies.

To me, Macs are appliances with everything automatic, while PCs offer more user interaction. I always avoided Macs because of the cost and poor multitasking.

My first tablet was an iPad1 and I am ready to ditch it in favor of Android.

Collapse -
Multitasking?
by DougieAThome / December 23, 2011 7:46 PM PST

Hi,

Collapse -
multitasking on macs -- MUCH better
by theanimaster / December 25, 2011 11:49 AM PST

Macs have a problem with multitasking?? LOL~! More like the other way around! I run a computer lab in school and the PCs running Windoze have ALWAYS been a severe let-down when it came to running multiple apps. They'd just simply crash a lot... I think everyone's familiar with the old "Explorer has encountered a problem and needs to close..." box. That's the least of your worries on Windoze. Also desktop and workspace setup on Windoze is horrible! On the Mac OS (and not even just Lion), it's easy to work with multiple open windows and apps. I've had 40 apps open at one point -- something you dare NOT do on Windoze!

Collapse -
Is this due to the Apple OS(-es)?
by RobertdeStrang / December 25, 2011 9:05 PM PST

Re "I see two Apple users with tags in the replies." -
Does anyone know whether this is just coincidence or has something to do with the OSes on the Mac>?

Collapse -
It is a bug in the forum software
by mrmacfixit Forum moderator / December 25, 2011 10:09 PM PST

it happens on Windows too.

Collapse -
I laugh at this question and some of the replies.
by Darrell Wright / December 23, 2011 7:39 AM PST

Here is the biggest Difference between owning a MAC Computer and a Windows oriented one. A new Mac computer has several advantages over the normal windows units. Although I still do not like any of the MAC programs and prefer the Windows programs instead. The main benefit to owning a MAC is it capable of having both operating systems on a single computer. The MAC seldom needs to be fixed from writing Bad Files. In fact the windows side of my Mac has only been redone 1 time in 3 years --- this is a record because most of the Windows based computers I owned had to have it's memory erased and Windows reinstalled every 3 months. If you use a MAC you do not need Virus protection, of course if you are running a split computer like I do, it is still wise to put antivirus on the Windows side. Finally all the Windows programs perform better on a MAC than they do on a Windows based computer. I think this is because when you buy a MAC, you do not get bloated trial programs everywhere (the reason Windows computers are so cheap), and Macs do not use cheap parts like they do with most Windows computers.

The hardest part for anyone making the switch is discovering these differences. When I first bought my MAC I hated it because I could not run the programs I was use to, Also the IMAC I bought was not capable of running Final Cut, though the Salesman claimed it would. These were two black marks that stayed against the MAC for a long time, until I discovered the dependability of this machine. By now I would have either started shopping for a new Windows computer, or would have replaced Fans, Powerpacks, DVD Drives, Hard Drives, Memory, and tons of other items that were going out or now to small to run decent programs. So far I have not had that same experience with a MAC. So overall I give MAC a much better grade because of these reasons, although I still hate "iMovie, GarageBand, and a ton of other MAC Programs."

Collapse -
Noob alert!
by santuccie / December 23, 2011 11:58 AM PST

@Darrell Wright:

Collapse -
Noob Alert part Deux....lol
by webserf / December 24, 2011 7:46 AM PST
In reply to: Noob alert!

@santucci,

Very much of what you've written is true. Not all but enough to be credible.

That said, "PC" is the acronym for "Personal Computer" which both Macs and IBM-based computers are.
Okay, now that we've gotten acronym training out of the way.... (and yes, I'm sure PC stands for more than just "Personal Computer", somewhere!)

In one of my original comments, I pointed out that the question of Mac, vs IBM-based PC's will go on forever it seems..

One aspect of what you've written is indeed true, that is, Windows based units have more software available and more hackers that want to attack and remote access these units, mainly because the Windows OS represents such a large cross-section of users, both personal and corporate (probably higher than 80%). The reason (for the most part) the Macs don't see very many virus/malware problems is because the "underground" of anonymous hackers want notoriety, and they can't get that recognition writing malware code for Macs. The more people get damaged by these hackers, the more "respect" they get from their cohorts.

I've seen very few if any large implementations of Mac OS use in networked corporate settings, but then I'm not around the business very often anymore.

Finally, for most people, BOTH setups will more than meet the needs of Internet access software, email software, word processing, and photo manipulation. Gaming might be one area that would compel a user to choose one over the other. But for the most part, a very satisfying user experience can come from the use of either at this juncture.

It is true that Windows based computers, need more attention as relates to drivers, and software updates. It's also true that they need to be "cleaned" more often, but that's because of what we've discussed above.

In short, if it weren't for the internet/email vulnerabilities, any computer will give good, reliable use. And finally, it's even simpler than that, Don't download "better" software intended to do what the OS already does, or software that isn't totally free of "toolbars", "helper apps", "search engine" hijacks, etc.. Many users get tricked in to loading these toolbars etc., and the tracking software causes problems over time.

Also, anything that's "FREE"??? ISN'T.

Windows 7, and the advent of Windows 8, will certainly close the gap of how "well" the OS works, and maybe then we can simply say, "buy the one that you like most"..

Collapse -
Try again, webserf
by santuccie / December 24, 2011 3:48 PM PST

@webserf:

Sorry, I didn't notice this post until I was scrolling down the page. A few things I would like to address...

"That said, "PC" is the acronym for "Personal Computer" which both Macs and IBM-based computers are. Okay, now that we've gotten acronym training out of the way.... (and yes, I'm sure PC stands for more than just "Personal Computer", somewhere!)"
>>>>Thank you, but I already knew what PC stands for. That said, the acronym, "PC" is popularly used these days to refer only to IBM-compatibles (formerly known as IBM clones).

"The reason (for the most part) the Macs don't see very many virus/malware problems is because the "underground" of anonymous hackers want notoriety, and they can't get that recognition writing malware code for Macs. The more people get damaged by these hackers, the more "respect" they get from their cohorts."
>>>>No, no, NO!!! WROOOOONG!!! Notoriety was a thing of interest back in the '90s, but nothing like that today. Most of what you see today in the "underground" is DoS-ing back and forth in gaming communities. Malware these days are written almost exclusively for PROFIT, not for notoriety (cybercrime overtook drug trafficking way back in 2004 to become the #1 largest criminal industry in the world. There's no notoriety in viruses, webserf; it doesn't take much to create a program that depends on user intervention to run.

The only way to gain "respect" these days is to design something that can execute code remotely, a drive-by download. And now with the annual Pwn2Own competitions that started in 2007, we have seen the Mac go down first EVERY SINGLE YEAR. And what are the hackers saying? Charlie Miller actually says the opposite of what you just made the mistake of suggesting. He said that he competes at Pwn2Own to get publicity for his company. And more importantly, he chooses to exploit the Mac every year specifically because "Hacking into Macs is so much easier." He wants to make sure that he wins, so he goes after the easiest target. He won Pwn2Own three years in a row: 2008, 2009, and 2010. The Mac was still the first to go down this year, but this time, it was VUPEN who did it (Charlie Miller went after the iPhone instead).

Viruses, on the other hand, are written not for notoriety these days, but for hate. They are sent in e-mail messages targeted at politicians and high-profile clergymen, whom the writers assume are running Windows because 9 out of 10 people do. In many cases, the victims forward the messages to friends and family, which is where all the patriotic and religious chain letters come from.

As Charlie Miller said, "If you're a bad guy and you're doing this to make money ... you don't want to spend 90 percent of your time on Windows and 10 percent on Mac. You're going to want to spend 100 percent of your time on Windows."

"Finally, for most people, BOTH setups will more than meet the needs of Internet access software, email software, word processing, and photo manipulation. Gaming might be one area that would compel a user to choose one over the other. But for the most part, a very satisfying user experience can come from the use of either at this juncture."
>>>>I haven't argued anything about a "very satisfying user experience." I've simply been saying that Windows is the standard, and currently more stable out of the box that Mac OS.

"It is true that Windows based computers, need more attention as relates to drivers, and software updates. It's also true that they need to be "cleaned" more often, but that's because of what we've discussed above."
>>>>I'd have to contest this claim. I don't clean temp files that often, although I always defragment my hard drives after installing updates (I don't defragment my laptop, though, as it has an SSD).

"In short, if it weren't for the internet/email vulnerabilities, any computer will give good, reliable use. And finally, it's even simpler than that, Don't download "better" software intended to do what the OS already does, or software that isn't totally free of "toolbars", "helper apps", "search engine" hijacks, etc.. Many users get tricked in to loading these toolbars etc., and the tracking software causes problems over time."
>>>>Your information is out of date. Windows is no more vulnerable than the Mac, and was actually LESS vulnerable until Apple finally got ASLR working in OS X Lion.

"Also, anything that's "FREE"??? ISN'T."
>>>>Not necessarily. Some things are totally free, depending on who you are to the provider. Sure, Mozilla makes money off you, but only because Google pays them for the searches you make from the Google searchbox, which is the default search engine in Fx. You, the user, pay nothing.

"Windows 7, and the advent of Windows 8, will certainly close the gap of how "well" the OS works, and maybe then we can simply say, "buy the one that you like most".."
>>>>Again, your information is out of date. Windows 7 is more stable out of the box than OS X, and stays that way as long as you're not a download junkie. I suggest you read some of my other posts, in which I discuss the out of box problems with OS X that you as a user have NO CONTROL over. I won't waste my keystrokes to post again.

I'm sorry, webserf, but you tried to correct me with information that is, in some cases, nearly a decade out of date! I suggest you read up before trying to correct me again; I've done my homework.

Collapse -
BTW
by santuccie / December 24, 2011 3:56 PM PST
In reply to: Try again, webserf

I forgot to mention that there are ZERO drive-by downloads in the wild that work on Windows 7 or Vista; they only work on XP, which doesn't have ASLR. You could actually run Vista SP1 or 7 right out the box, with NO antivirus, and nothing would touch you unless you install it yourself. This includes mistakenly clicking the red "X" button in a rogue antivirus pop-up (which is deceptively designed to install it anyway); the proper way to avoid infection with this is to terminate the browser window via the Alt+F4 key combination.

Collapse -
All that energy over the Acronym "PC"
by webserf / December 25, 2011 2:33 AM PST
In reply to: Try again, webserf

Sorry to set you off if you felt attacked by what was a comment in passing that took me less than 5 minutes to write regarding PC's.
But if you feel better imposing your more "current" knowledge, then great.

Ever hear of the group "Anonymous"?, (as one example?) Let me help you get started: https://www.google.com/search?q=anonymous+hackers&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a
...I rest my case on the question of Profit vs. Notoriety. Of course there are those who would "PROFIT" as well. I never staunchly made it about one or the other (as you did).

As to the rest I'll let readers decide for themselves (given the copious amount of information submitted (again)) , which was the original intent of my posts in the first place.

NO time to "debate/argue" about the rest because frankly, I'm not that passionate about it, and most folks reading this thread don't care. People who are truly technical will glance over this for the most part and move on. And people interested in this thread are going to mostly be end-users, and not coders.

Happy Holidays.

Collapse -
Energy over misinformation
by santuccie / December 25, 2011 3:16 AM PST

I am a stickler for accuracy of information. If I am wrong, I will let it be known. If you are wrong, I will let it be known. You seemed to care when you were trying to correct me; now you don't care because you got corrected.

Collapse -
uh-huh...
by theanimaster / December 25, 2011 12:11 PM PST

<span id="INSERTION_MARKER"> I guess those people who go to you for help on "locking down their systems" are mostly WIndoze users as well : )
<span id="INSERTION_MARKER">

<span id="INSERTION_MARKER">

I'll go by what's in front of my eyes: My mac (specifically, MY mac, as with YOUR pc) doesn't get any problems, my lab full of Windoze PCs has had nothing BUT problems, whereas the little mac-group in our faculty has had less problems regarding software (but some weird problems regarding bluetooth, wifi, and the wireless mice and keyboards) -- all which I could fix without having to wade through hundreds of posts in forums (you'd think that it'd be easier to find solutions to Windoze problems because of their market share but... nooooo).

Collapse -
(NT) Nice. How old are you?
by santuccie / December 25, 2011 3:26 PM PST
In reply to: uh-huh...
Collapse -
BTW
by santuccie / December 25, 2011 5:38 PM PST
In reply to: uh-huh...

What is Windoze? I've never heard of such a platform, unless it comes from a land not far from the La La Land that bred Crapple.

Collapse -
had to have it's memory erased and Windows reinstalled every
by swamprat / December 24, 2011 5:38 AM PST
Most of the Windows based computers I owned had to have it's memory erased and Windows reinstalled every 3 months.

Dude, Are you serious??? The only time I've seen a need to reload windows is when a drive fails or STUPID Knocks. XP Vista and 7 windows have protected files so just how are they getting corrupted? Living in a virtual world of corrupted porn sites? Me thinks thou dust stretch the truth a bit to enhance the wonders of the apple. Remember sin came with the bite of the apple. See LOGO A PPle.

Every three months huh You sure you aren't thinking of a windows clone on da apple. That or you have the worse operating machines on the planet.
"Laissez Le Bon Temps Roulet"
an an MERRY CHRISTMAS TO YOU ALL.
Le swamprat
Collapse -
Switch to MAC
by RayC / December 23, 2011 10:00 AM PST

Hi,

Collapse -
Running Access files.
by DougieAThome / December 23, 2011 8:00 PM PST
In reply to: Switch to MAC

Apples Iworks software is capable of running Windows Office files. I suppose Apple recognises the need for inter-operability between the different software options to accommodate those with Macs at home and PCs at there work place, and vice-versa.

Collapse -
iWorks is great but...
by theanimaster / December 25, 2011 12:33 PM PST
In reply to: Running Access files.

Apple's Numbers (Excel) sucks. It doesn't support certain things that Excel does -- such as vertical oriented typing.

Collapse -
Microsoft never made a version of Access for the Mac
by mrmacfixit Forum moderator / December 23, 2011 11:27 PM PST
In reply to: Switch to MAC

but,
with Parallels or VMFusion you can run Windows on your Mac and still be able to run Access.
P

Collapse -
Database issue
by jbmnyc / December 24, 2011 1:01 AM PST
In reply to: Switch to MAC
I agree with the above comment. My main reason for not switching has been the cumbersome process (from a website) of changing Lotus Organizer data base to Outlook on the PC. THEN being able to get Outlook into the Mac format. Also concern about inefficient or slow performance of using parallels or an Office for Mac or other MS program on the iMac. The main reason for wanting to change includes: presumably faster and easier to use, compatibility with iPad and possibly iPhone (though using Android now), and generally seamless use of iPod or other music (iTunes) and Apple TV utilities.
Collapse -
MS Office for Mac,
by mrmacfixit Forum moderator / December 24, 2011 6:34 AM PST
In reply to: Database issue

contains Outlook and I believe the file format is the same on Windows as it is on the Mac.
It actually runs reasonably well on a newer Mac and acceptably well on an older Mac.

Collapse -
Outlook
by jbmnyc / December 24, 2011 6:51 AM PST
In reply to: MS Office for Mac,

Yes, I understand. The problem is converting Lotus Organizer to Outlook.

Collapse -
The adress books.
by ernestolsen / December 25, 2011 3:37 AM PST
In reply to: MS Office for Mac,

I wish there was an easy way to get osx address book to sync with the outlook one and vis-versa. This is a complaint mainly aimed at Microsoft. Ended upgrading to Office 2011, because it had Outlook. I use Office 2010 on my Toshiba.

Collapse -
Access on mac
by watchgrassgrow / January 8, 2012 6:02 AM PST
In reply to: Switch to MAC

RayC - Did anyone ever mention MacOS's Bootcamp to you? With VMware Fusion or Parallels, you're working within a virtual system, but if you're dealing with large database files, that could drive you crazy. Assuming that you can work within an Access file without drawing upon a number of Mac files, you can start up your Mac in Bootcamp, install whichever flavor of Windows OS upgrade (for licensing, MS legally views an OS install on a Mac as an "upgrade") you want, and it will run very well. In addition, if you keep that Bootcamp's software installation super-stripped down, you'll find performance will be optimized for that single task.

Collapse -
Good on'ya
by theanimaster / December 25, 2011 11:36 AM PST

I would still be using my 2005 iMac G5 too if not for its motherboard/graphics dying the second time around! The first time was 3 days after the 3 year warranty expired -- and good thing I was still able to get the entire midplane assembly replaced under the warranty (special case)!! It took a while though! They kept replacing it with just MORE busted midplane assemblies, until finally they put in one that works (well... up until now). The graphics haven't fully failed yet -- can still do basic word processing, office and internet surfing but absolutely NO games (or iTunes visual effects)! I've packed it back up in the box and will be giving it to my sons to play with it in the future (when they've old enough to).

Popular Forums
icon
Computer Help 47,885 discussions
icon
Computer Newbies 10,322 discussions
icon
iPhones, iPods, & iPads 3,188 discussions
icon
Security 30,333 discussions
icon
TVs & Home Theaters 20,177 discussions
icon
HDTV Picture Setting 1,932 discussions
icon
Phones 15,713 discussions
icon
Windows 7 6,210 discussions
icon
Networking & Wireless 14,510 discussions

Tech for the holiday

Find recipes for July 4 with these foodie apps

The Fourth of July means fireworks, fun and food. If you're planning on a barbecue this weekend, we've got the apps to help you find holiday-inspired recipes.