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Windows Security Alert: Device Monitor Application?

by bebubblyandbright / December 27, 2012 1:01 PM PST

I just installed Norton IS, and restarted the computer as told. We've had our subscription expired for a few days now, so we haven't had that protection. (I don't believe this was caused by Norton.)

When I restarted and logged on to my user account, I got a pop up from the windows firewall that reads "Windows security alert: Do you want to keep blocking this program?"

The program is called Device Monitor Application. If that name isn't sketchy enough, the publisher is "unknown". I tried to look this up briefly but didn't seem to find anyone with the same problem. I only came across things suggesting that DMA is a battery monitor or something of the sorts, however.... I have a desktop computer and no need to monitor a battery as it is not a laptop...and if it is a system thing, wouldn't it say it was published by Microsoft instead of unknown? If it's a program from Norton, I assume it would be published by Symantec. It also has an odd looking thumbnail beside it. Looks kinda like a screen shot of a web page or program, with a red bar on top of the page/program or whatever it is.

I think this alert has been around for a few days now, but I'm not entirely sure. My mom would just click "Ask me later" until I got home to deal with it. I say this because I noticed the red shield with the exclamation mark icon thing in my toolbar (opposite of the start menu, beside the clock) and upon mouse over it said Windows security alert, but I didn't bother to click on it as I assumed it would just be telling me that Norton is turned off because it was expired.

I'm just worried because I haven't had an antivirus or antispyware program. What is it? Should I Unblock it or Keep blocking? I have Windows XP.

Thanks (:

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All Answers

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Answer
Upon investigation
by lacsr / December 27, 2012 8:22 PM PST

It would seem that a device that is normally attached to the computer: IE printer, smartphone or just about anything, has a software monitoring application looking for the device. Something has asked for permission to allow the connection to the device and the firewall has temporarily lost the permissions given to allow the connection. That particular problem could be the fault of Norton being out of date. I do not understand the statement "I just installed Norton IS, and restarted the computer as told. We've had our subscription expired for a few days now, so we haven't had that protection." Normally installing a new software package like Norton will give you a 30 trial period, so that first part of the statement and the last part do not correlate.

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Answer
BTW
by lacsr / December 27, 2012 8:28 PM PST
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Answer
Windows Security Center Alert
by Carol~ Forum moderator / December 28, 2012 1:08 AM PST

'I noticed the red shield with the exclamation mark icon thing in my toolbar (opposite of the start menu, beside the clock) and upon mouse over it said Windows security alert, but I didn't bother to click on it as I assumed it would just be telling me that Norton is turned off because it was expired.'

If you installed a new version (and rebooted), the Security Center shouldn't be reporting it as expired. In all likelihood, the Security Center is alerting you to the fact the Windows Firewall is turned off. It's turned off because NIS has its own built-in firewall. NIS should have automatically turned off Windows Firewall. You might want to check to make sure NIS has its Smart Firewall enabled . Then go the Security Center to make sure the Windows Firewall is off.

As far as the Device Monitor Application is concerned... I can't tell you with any certainty exactly where it's coming from. Or at least not from the "thumbnail description" you provided. Do you have a Lexmark printer installed? See this. Or here where it describes the Device Monitor Application as "giving computer users an interface to directly view the performance of, and frequently control, specific pieces of hardware. These can include hot-plug devices and Internet connections".

If you still have doubts, you can always scan with Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware. It's free and should give you an overall idea if you installed any "unwanted visitors" while without security software. I would suggest keeping it and using it as a standalone scanner. (Make sure it's updated)

Best of luck..
Carol

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