Windows 7 forum

Question

Win 7 deleting short cut icons on desktop

by MrGatorNation / April 27, 2013 6:20 AM PDT

I recently upgraded three of my wife's office computers from XP pro to Win 7 Pro. About a week after I did the upgrade, all 5 icons that I placed on each desktop that Linked to our file server (also Win 7 Pro) were deleted by Windows 7.

Apparently this is a "feature" of Win 7 that if you have multiple icons that link to another computer that aren't available at a given moment, the icons get deleted...WITHOUT ASKING IF IT IS OK TO DO SO. These links were not broken links, the file server was temporarily off line for OS updates. The MS "quick fix" for this "feature" is "not available" for my OS version according to the MS website.

My question is: is there a way to disable this feature without hacking the registry?

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All Answers

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Answer
This has never happened to us.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / April 27, 2013 7:06 AM PDT

We have dozens of machines and I've seen that with the desktop cleanup feature but folk must answer it's OK. There are folk that claim it does it without asking but we've never had it happen.
Bob

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I've had it happen between one use of the computer and the
by Ziks511 / May 3, 2013 3:24 AM PDT

next, when the computer shuts itself down because of lack of use. Not a battery issue (mine's a laptop), just an involuntary ?hibernation? issue. Mostly I just create a new shortcut to replace the old one and soldier on.

Rob

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Now this is happening.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / May 3, 2013 4:47 AM PDT

In the weird weird world of consumers clamoring for a nanny to control their energy use, many PCs auto shutdown on non-use. What more can we say about that but take back control and learn all the power settings of Windows?
Bob

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I'd love to...
by gordon451 / May 3, 2013 12:53 PM PDT
In reply to: Now this is happening.

take back control--I still have my beloved W2K Pro CD Love --but I can't find W2K drivers for the new boxes Cry

I've noticed that Microsoft is slowly, stealthily taking over the world, simply by giving us less and less control over our computers. For example, look at the glaring white background of system apps, eg: NotePad. Would you like a less antagonistic colour? In W7 I had to use the "Classic" desktop, thus depriving myself of the alleged benfits in Aero, just so I could access every (well, most) aspect of the dektop display. In W8? M$ took away the "Classic" desktop. You now need an aftermarket app to load it--but AFAIK you can't boot into it.

That is only one example of many. I know for sure that W7 is the last Microsoft OS I will ever own. OTOH, HaikuOS looks very promising, and I have seen words about a "Windows Kernel" distro which may come to something.

Gordon.

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I apologise, I was unclear.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / May 3, 2013 12:59 PM PDT
In reply to: I'd love to...

Just last week the office picked up some new Windows 8 laptops and it took a few days to find all the controls. Not only were they not the standard Windows Power Control applet but the maker's power center app said one thing but on/off was not as you thought and was the opposite.

Out of the box, it would sleep and took a few days to get Classic Shell in and this power setting sorted.

What I really meant was that with the lack of manuals and words I can't write about support here, we have to dig in deeper.
Bob

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No, no, don't apologise...
by gordon451 / May 3, 2013 5:32 PM PDT

your meaning was clear. I was ranting, a few bad OS things had just ambushed me.

You are right, we have to dig in deeper, but also wider around. It seems M$ hasn't learned from (bad)XP(erience), but then again, who was going to tell them? The fanbois who mourn its passing? Obvoiusly they never had to maintain/fix problems!

I better shut up now, & let the thread get back on topic Laugh

BTW, Classic Shell is simply the best Cool

Gordon.

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Classic Shell is great.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / May 4, 2013 1:57 AM PDT

I think it may save the day for many.

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Answer
Disabled The "System Maintenance Troubleshooter" Yet?
by Grif Thomas Forum moderator / May 1, 2013 4:38 AM PDT
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Answer
Does it happen also ...
by Kees_B Forum moderator / May 1, 2013 5:00 AM PDT

if you make that shortcuts readonly?

If it's a supported and document registry change (you didn't tell), why not do it?

Kees

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