TVs & Home Theaters forum

General discussion

Why upscale in DVD Player or A/V Receiver?

by hemant_k / June 12, 2007 11:52 PM PDT

Since all HD TVs scale incoming signals to fit their native resolution (e.g. 1365x768 on the Pioneer 5070HD), why would one need an upscaling DVD Player or an upscaling A/V Receiver?

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upconverting
by bevillan / June 12, 2007 11:54 PM PDT

Some HDTVs don't upconvert signals as well as certain upconverting DVD players or AV receivers do. So when you have a TV that is poor at doing so, you would want the video processing to be done before sending the signal to the TV.

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Simple. . .
by Coryphaeus / June 13, 2007 2:04 AM PDT

The picture looks better. Duh!

TVs are better at displaying input, not upconverting said input. An upconverted signal from a DVD player looks better, much better, than non-upconverted. Trust me. My Samsung DVD/VCR upconverter looks fantastic on my Sony 55" SXRD.

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Just depends
by RustyDallas / June 13, 2007 2:25 AM PDT

I have a Sony 60" XBR-2 and bought the OPPO upconverting HDMI DVD player that CNET raves about. The picture is so close to the picture I got with a cheap non upconverting player, for me, it wasn't worth the money. I'm told I have a very good upconverter in my TV and that is the reason. So, I think some people will think it's worth it and some not depending on how well their TV handles the job.

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Scaler quality...
by hemant_k / June 13, 2007 6:16 AM PDT
In reply to: Just depends

Guess the performance of the TV's scaler will define quality. Can anybody comment on the quality of scaler that comes with the Pioneer 5070HD plasma? thanks

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(NT) (NT) Just curious, which oppo do you have Rusty?
by misterguy / June 13, 2007 1:57 PM PDT
In reply to: Just depends
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(NT) DV-981HD
by RustyDallas / June 13, 2007 7:56 PM PDT
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you have a valid point
by ottomatic / June 13, 2007 7:55 AM PDT

some say that because your "standard" dvd player has to take a digital source (DVD), convert that to analog for transmission, then your tv takes the analog and coverts back to digital, you lose some quality.

If you get a newer "upconverting" dvd player, it will most likely have a digital connection and your DVD source will stay digital through the entire process. Some people feel that is why you sometimes will get a better picture with an upconverting player. That and what the others have said about some players having better upconverting hardware than your tv.

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