Windows 7 forum

Question

Which windows 7 cd should i buy?

by wojcio999 / October 31, 2013 8:11 AM PDT

I currently have windows vista on dell xps 730x,Whcih windows 7 disc should i buy to install a clean copy of windows 7 on my computer? I am asking because i just happen to install windows 7 on my friends computer from windows 7 OEM disc, after installing that the authentication code would not work.

Thanks

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All Answers

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Answer
That's a common misconception.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / October 31, 2013 8:16 AM PDT

I can take a stock Dell install and clean it up in about 20 minutes. I wonder if your question is about which 7 to buy or is it about "clean install"?

The license changed a bit over the years so I will not enter the OEM license debate. Just get the version of 7 OEM you want at newegg, etc. and go for it.

Bob

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Answer
Proper.
by Dafydd Forum moderator / October 31, 2013 8:41 AM PDT

An OEM disc is tied to the mobo and dies with it . You would be looking at a retail version.

Dafydd.

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This is NOT true!
by Flatworm / November 1, 2013 9:30 PM PDT
In reply to: Proper.

A Windows 7 (or other) OEM disk is NOT "tied to the motherboard." I know this absolutely because shortly after my initial install of the OEM version of Windows 7 in my home-built computer a lightning bolt fried my motherboard. I installed a new and different motherboard and did not need to reinstall or reauthorize Windows 7; it booted right directly up.

Microsoft uses a far more complicated way of handling licensing. It is based on a certain number of components that can be replaced over a given (brief) period of time, RAM, video card, main processor, disk drives and whatnot, only one of which is the motherboard. I believe, but do not know for certain, that the number of critical components that can change at once is three without having to call Microsoft and explain what happened (at which time they will usually allow you to reauthorize).

I am now on Windows 8.1 (on the same computer) and need to replace my motherboard next week (a lot of the back-panel USB ports suddenly stopped working on "Gremlin Wednesday" this past week on the old one, and it WASN'T the drivers).

Windows licenses, whether distributed on disk or some other installation method, are tied to the overall computer, not any single component of it like the motherboard.

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Branded?
by bob b / November 2, 2013 4:12 AM PDT
In reply to: This is NOT true!

The OP has a Dell machine.
Swap that mobo with a non Dell unit and I suspect Msft is going to get upset.
Then you get to have a chat with the Msft folks.
Perhaps that's why Dell/Hp/etc can buy those disc for 20 bucks each.

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Well licensing forr Window 8.0
by orlbuckeye / November 3, 2013 8:58 PM PST
In reply to: This is NOT true!

has changed as the OEM version doesn't exist anymore. Basically the OEM version has been divided into the System Builder license and the Personal Usage. These are basically the same as the old OEM type license of the past but one is for a system you build for yourself and one to build on a system for someone (building and selling computers).

Also Straight from MS licensing page.

Users who run a Microsoft Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) operating system may upgrade or replace most of the hardware components on the computer and still maintain the license for the original Microsoft OEM operating system software provided by the OEM, with the exception of an upgrade or a replacement of the motherboard. An upgrade or a replacement of the motherboard is considered to create a new personal computer. Therefore, Microsoft OEM operating system software cannot be transferred from another computer. If the motherboard is upgraded or replaced for reasons other than a defect then a new computer is created, and a new operating system license is required. If the motherboard is replaced because of a defect, the user does not need to acquire a new operating system license for the computer. The motherboard replacement must be the same make and model, or the same manufacturer's replacement or equivalent, as defined by that manufacturer's warranty. The reason for this licensing rule primarily relates to the end-user license agreement (EULA) and the support of the software covered by that EULA. The EULA is a set of usage rights granted to the end-user by the computer manufacturer. The EULA relates only to rights for that software as installed on that particular computer. The System Builder is required to support the software on that individual computer.

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Answer
Call Dell.....have a chat.
by bob b / October 31, 2013 10:08 AM PDT

Tell them what machine you have and what you want to do.
Upgrade from vista to w7.

They might have the w7 upgrade .....os and driver discs..... available as a pkg.

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Answer
I agree with bob b
by itsdigger / October 31, 2013 10:33 AM PDT

If you want Win 7 and you already have Vista installed just buy a Windows 7 upgrade disc. You don't need to contact Dell though, you can buy them online all over like Amazon or Newegg or anywhere. When installing the upgrade you don't have to search for drivers and such as the upgrade uses the same drivers as Vista so their already installed. I've used the upgrade discs on two computers and it was a breeze....Digger

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Answer
Just re-read this carefully.
by Dafydd Forum moderator / October 31, 2013 10:59 AM PDT

You want to upgrade from Vista to 7 right? Go with Bob's reply. The win 7 OEM disc you used on your friends computer, did that come with that computer?

Dafydd.

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Answer
Do you mean an Upgrad disk, or Edition type?
by Mr Windows / November 1, 2013 1:46 PM PDT

First off, I agree with bob b. By all means, contact Dell. But, what I think you mean is what edition of Windows 7 should you buy. I'll tell you what I tell all my clients, the minimum Edition of Windows 7 you should buy is the Professional Edition.

Here's why, With the Professional edition, and above, you are entitled to download from Microsoft, a FREE virtual copy of Windows XP, for any legacy software you might have, that needs XP to run. The free virtual XP itself, is worth the extra cost of the Pro Edition.

If you need the extra security that BitLocker Disk Encryption will give you, you will have to spring for the Ultimate Edition. Just be aware, that your mother board my not let you use BitLocker natively. You may need to have a USB key (with the BitLocker code) in one of your computers USB ports at boot up, and the entire time you use your computer.

In any event, you will find Windows 7 to be a fine operating system (the best one to date IMHO), and have many years of enjoyable computing ahead of you.

Regards,
Mr. Windows

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If you're
by itsdigger / November 1, 2013 4:59 PM PDT

doing a Windows 7 Upgrade , you can only Upgrade to the same Level that you have of Vista.

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Come to think of it,
by Mr Windows / November 2, 2013 12:50 AM PDT
In reply to: If you're

I believe you're right. I went for full installation, as I do with all my clients. I haven't done an upgrade for quite a long time. However, I would still encourage wojcio999 to get a Full Installation of Windows 7 rather than the upgrade. If for nothing else, should he ever need to re-install it, there is no need to install Vista, then the Win 7 upgrade. It's just easier over the long hall.


Regards,
Mr. Windows

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I agree
by itsdigger / November 2, 2013 1:01 AM PDT
In reply to: Come to think of it,

but an upgrade just save people from finding the drivers. The average user just wants to load the OS on the fly and use it. ....Digger

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That's quite true...
by Mr Windows / November 2, 2013 8:35 AM PDT
In reply to: I agree

But, you can install a full version of Windows 7, then the Windows Vista drives (your hardware hasn't changed). Then get a Driver Updater, there are several out there. I have used Advanced Driver Updater from SYSTWEAK, ever since it was recommended by CNET. It also has the distinct advantage of being a Microsoft Partner.

I've never had a problem with it, and I can usually revive a sluggish old PC into a race car in just a few minutes. I'm not shilling for them, I'm just using them as an example of how easy it can be to get your drivers up to date with a new operating system. Of coarse, it goes without saying, that you would have internet access, and the Driver Updater before you started installing the new O/S.

Regards,
Mr. Windows

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The problem with Driver Updaters are the scams.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / November 2, 2013 10:23 AM PDT
In reply to: That's quite true...

It's been close to 2 decades and I have yet to use a driver updater app since I can get drivers from the makers for free.

The real problem I encounter with those driver updaters are a few are downright scams, many don't work and getting a refund is a p,i,t,a.

You won't read me advising to use those.
Bob

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I was waiting for you
by itsdigger / November 2, 2013 10:27 AM PDT

jump in there Bob. I couldn't say that with any authority but, I had read that here before....Digger

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I hear you, and agree....
by Mr Windows / November 2, 2013 11:18 AM PDT
In reply to: I was waiting for you
But, when the product was singled out for recommendation by CNET.com, I thought I should give it a try. I'm glad I did, because it does everything the CNET review said it would. I rely on the recommendations from CNET, and have only been let down on a couple of occasions.

They're not perfect, who is? They are spot on enough for me to trust them though. To be very honest, I wasn't expecting a lot from "A.D.U.", but they surprised me. It's a tremendously useful product, that's now a permanent part of my tool kit.

Every now and then, if you trust the source of the recommendation, it's worth trying something new. Even if you've had bad luck with that type of product in the past.

Regards,
Mr. Windows
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I wish they worked for me.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / November 2, 2013 4:56 PM PDT

Time and time again they failed and with makers supplying drivers for free I won't recommend these.
Bob

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