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What to do with .exe file AFTER installing the software

by konradr_9 / January 1, 2006 4:34 AM PST

Hello,
Happy New Year! Quick (and probably painfully simple) question:
* I download a software program as a .exe file.
* I install the software.
* I'm left with a .exe file.

Question: Can I delete it? BEcause my hard drive is loaded with large .exe files AND the programs they installed. I'd love to clear out megs and megs of HD space by deleting them but don't want to negatively affect the programs they delivered.

Can I safely delete these .exe files?

Thanks in advance for your info.
K

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K, Either Save To CD or Delete..My Preference
by Grif Thomas Forum moderator / January 1, 2006 5:23 AM PST

...is generally to save those important .exe installer files to a separate CD..That way, I don't have to hunt them down again to reinstall the program should the hard drive take a turn for the worse.

In addition, I keep backup installers (.exe) files of my updated drivers..Once again, it's easier than hunting them down again.

Hope this helps.

Grif

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THANKS!
by konradr_9 / January 1, 2006 5:38 AM PST

Great approaches, both. Thanks so much and enjoy 2006!
K

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What I do
by TONI H / January 1, 2006 5:24 AM PST

I rename all of the downloaded files I accumulate as they are installed to something identifiable by me since leaving the .zip or .exe extension doesn't change the file itself. Many downloads don't come in with names you can use to identify the program.

Then I move all the ones I want to keep because I'm happy with the program to a separate folder on my harddrive....and then once the folder is large enough to fit on one 4.7GB DATA dvd, I burn it. Then I delete the folder completely and start over again.

If you can't identify the file, you can actually start the installation by clicking the .exe or extracting the .zip file temporarily, and then you will see the name of the program and the version number of it (I include the version number in the new filename). Usually the extracted .zip file will have a 'readme.txt' type or license.txt file that gives that information. You can always stop the installation of .exe files at the first screen without harm once you have the info you need to rename the file itself.

TONI

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Thanks
by Silvergirl46 / January 8, 2013 3:56 PM PST
In reply to: What I do

Found this thread, it's good advice, I double virus check as I go too. Thank you.

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