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Question

What is the most secure yet afforable database software?

by Zaiaku / March 20, 2013 3:56 AM PDT

I'd like to organize some data I have into an easy to search database, but I'd also like it to be very secure from anyone both local and remote. OpenOffice and LibreOffice Base looks like nice free software but doesn't seem secure enough, and Microsoft Access doesn't appear too much better. So far from my research Microsoft SQL Server might be the best bet, but I'd like to hear another's opinion on what options are available.

I'm completely new to the world of database technology. If there is both a safe and affordable option I would be very happy to hear of it. Thank you!

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All Answers

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Answer
Sorry but the secure part is a little confusing.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / March 20, 2013 4:02 AM PDT

First, I have programmed front ends for MySQL for over a decade and while I like that system, you lead with security which I'm wondering about a lot today. That is, as I read http://forums.cnet.com/7723-6132_102-588972/news-march-20-2013/?tag=contentBody;threadListing and my contribution there I don't think this is the app's responsibility to secure your PC.

You see this issue with JAVA as the pundits weigh in that the language or run-time should secure what is a very insecure PERSONAL computer.

That out of the way, Why SQL at all? Are you going to learn SQL?
Bob

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Sorry for the confusion
by Zaiaku / March 20, 2013 4:16 AM PDT

I started looking at SQL when people had suggested it as being safer than the previously mentioned softwares. Safe how, I don't know. I've been researching it only a little bit first to try and figure out how well it suits my needs. The PC would be certainly be secure, but any added protection that could be placed onto the database would be welcome.

As for learning SQL, I'm still figuring out what it is or if it's what I'm even after.

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Again we dance around app as the security cop?
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / March 20, 2013 4:20 AM PDT

Your PC is secure or it is not. Let's keep that part simple.

Most PCs I can log into if I have physical access. How? -> NTPASSWD <-

So you must maintain not only the usual security but physical security as well.

-> Back to SQL. It's not that hard but why SQL at all? Why not some spreadsheet if there is only a few hundred items? Yes, that's abusing a spreadsheet but it's quick and dirty and gets it done today.
Bob

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