TVs & Home Theaters forum

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What is meant by "Class" HD TV.

by sailsomsen / September 28, 2008 1:43 AM PDT

I have recently seen ads for TV's such as: 32" LCD Class HD TV, or 26" LCD Class HD TV. What is this term: Class?

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hm
by johnisnotcool / September 28, 2008 2:11 AM PDT

The only thing I can think of is maybe its a Glass LCD...

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(NT) class='type' (n/t)
by Pepe7 / September 28, 2008 3:00 AM PDT
In reply to: hm
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Pepe7 is correct
by Dan Filice / September 28, 2008 4:37 AM PDT
In reply to: class='type' (n/t)

The term "class" is a marketing term to make "type" sound more important than it really is.

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That helps ... Not
by LionsMike / December 9, 2009 12:20 PM PST
In reply to: Pepe7 is correct

If Class = NT what does NT mean if NT means that it is not thermal does that make ii a piece of crap which will not function over some temperature like 85 degrees F.

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NT=no text (in the body of the message)
by Pepe7 / December 10, 2009 12:15 AM PST
In reply to: That helps ... Not

A little googling would have explained that to you, sir.

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Truth in Advertising?
by rockwech / October 19, 2008 1:36 AM PDT

The only TV's that seem to use the word "Class" have actual screen sizes that are smaller than the size in the TV name. For example, a TV with a screen size of 41.65" would be listed as a 42" Class. The TV's with a screen sizes that matches their names don't use the word "Class". Maybe one of the companies got sued?

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I ALSO HAVE NOTICED THIS, BUT ONLY SMALLER THAN.............
by Riverledge / October 20, 2008 11:23 AM PDT
In reply to: Truth in Advertising?

ACTUAL SIZE; SUCH AS A 49.7" SET IS CONSIDERED A "50" CLASS HDTV."

RIVER.

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Answered
by Screamineagle44 / August 25, 2012 1:58 AM PDT
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