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What GPS Software to buy

by rnes1961 / July 2, 2008 1:47 PM PDT

I just purchased GPS enabled Pocket PC (Windows Mobile 6) operating system. It?s a E-Ten GloFiish X800. I am trying to figure out what GPS software to get for it. There are a lot of choices and prices vary wildly (Garmin, Delorme, CoPilot, Tom-Tom). I have been looking for reviews and web sites that compare the options but have not been able to find much. One MAJOR requirement is that it NOT rely on the Internet, I do not have data service with my phone and do not want it. The 3 main uses I will be using this GPS for are (and in order ).


1. Walking. My wife and I are training to walk a marathon, I would like a GPS to help with distance, speed, time, and logging our walks.
2. Turn by Turn navigation directions for the use in the car, and finally ?
3. Hiking off the road, in wilderness areas and for hunting.

Does any one know of a good site that reviews this type of software? Whats are some things I should look for? The things that I can think of (besides what I have outlined above), are How hard is it or how much does it cost for Map updates? Can you hear and understand the voice on the Pocket PC when its giving voice directions? How good are the directions? What is the support like?

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Lesson learned.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / July 2, 2008 10:40 PM PDT

Go get a GPS unit. I've tried it on PDAs and the 4 or less battery time is not a good thing. As to support it's less than what you get on your PDA and PC. But you say you want to try anyway? Go get TomTom for your PDA. Done.
Bob

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A few answers...
by John.Wilkinson / July 3, 2008 2:52 PM PDT

-> Note that I have yet to find a GPS software package for the PDA that includes both driving and hiking maps. You're most likely looking to make two separate purchases here whether you want to or not.

-> I'd look for past frequency of updates, the types and quantity of hotspots (gas stations, emergency stations, restaurants, etc) listed, as well as niceties such as phone numbers included. Some also include live traffic conditions if you have an internet connection...always a plus.

-> Updating the maps is easy, and most will offer free updates for one year. Look to spend at least $50 for map updates thereafter, and those are limited...you may have to upgrade the software to update the maps. Check their policies before buying.

-> Yes, you can hear/understand the spoken directions, provided you don't have it in a case/pocket/purse or the radio up too loud.

-> Directions vary widely between services and location. In larger cities where road construction and business openings/closings is more of an issue maps become outdated much faster. One tip: Go to your local electronics store and try some of their standalone GPS units from those companies. Enter some sample routes you take daily and see how accurate they are where you live. The PDA versions use the same maps, so it's a good way to see which one suits you best.

-> Support varies widely. TomTom's generally good, Garmin slacks off now and then, CoPilot's OK, and I haven't dealt with Delorme.

-> Remember that 4-hour battery life! That's why PDA's don't make good GPS units unless you have a car charger and/or extended battery packs.

Hope this helps,
John

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Have Delorme, don't bother.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / July 4, 2008 12:44 AM PDT
In reply to: A few answers...

Its a bargain, runs on all PDAs it seems but feels like we are in 1990 running DOS. Nothing here folks, move along.
Bob

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Sorry if I was unclear. Delorme wasn't slow.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / July 4, 2008 6:07 AM PDT

Its just in a class of software you would see prior to 1990. Not very intuitive, features that don't work well, clumsy and other words. Go try TomTom. It's about as good as it gets.
Bob

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GPS Software questions for Pocket PC
by rnes1961 / July 4, 2008 6:05 AM PDT
In reply to: A few answers...

Thanks for your response. I do not think that the four hour battery life would be too much of a problem. My walks normally do not last more than about 3 or so. In the car I have a charger, so its not a problem there. I am hesitant to get a stand alone GPS. I just got this pocket PC so I could get rid of my Palm, Cell Phone, MP3 player and Pager (yes I still had a pager). I went from four devices down to one, I would hate to start collecting more electronic devices again.

Bobs answer made me think a little about performance. Do you know how the different products compare performance wise? It sounds like Bob thinks that Delorme (about the cheapest around) is sluggish, what about CoPilot, Garmin, TomTom, and one I just ran across called "Fugawi Global Navigator"?

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GPS software
by gringo71 / March 31, 2010 12:27 AM PDT

Mio has some good GPS software that may be suitable for your uses, and they have decent map updates - might be worth checking out!

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