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Question

What does the 60i mean in 1920 x 1080/60i?

by redflyer89 / December 11, 2011 3:26 AM PST

I have a 46" LED 1080p 120Hz TV. When I turn it on it displays a box at the top that says 1920x1080/60i. My main question is what does that 60i mean?

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All Answers

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Answer
What does the 60i mean in 1920 x 1080/60i
by Samsung_CE_Tech Samsung staff / December 12, 2011 5:32 AM PST

redflyer89,

The 60i that is being stated in the infobox refers to the signal's refresh rate and the way that the signal is being transmitted. "60" stands for 60Hz and the "i" stands for interlaced.

--HDTech

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What does the 60i mean in 1920 x 1080/60i
by redflyer89 / December 12, 2011 7:59 AM PST

But the TV is 1080p and 120 Hz. Is it showing 60i because cable doesn't broadcast in 1080p and 120 Hz yet? And when I use my Blu-ray player it says 24p instead of 60i. Is there a setting to change to get it to play at 120 Hz?

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What does the 60i mean in 1920 x 1080/60i
by Samsung_CE_Tech Samsung staff / December 12, 2011 9:32 AM PST

redflyer89,

The reason you are seeing the 60i in the info box is because the info box only displays the signal's actual Hz and screen resolution and not the info of the picture on the screen after the TV processes it. Meaning that the 60i you are seeing is the signals actual specification and not the screen's specification. Currently there is no way to display the screen's specification in the info box since those specs are constant. Coincidentally, the Samsung TVs can only accept a 60Hz and lower signal.

As for the BD Player's signal, 24p is actually the industry standard for Blu-Rays, since it most closely matches the frame rate of an actual in-theater movie. As a personal preference, I would not want extra processes adjusting the film's look and feel, since the way it is recorded on the disk is how the film makers intended it to be viewed. So I would actually turn off the Auto Motion Plus system (which will upconvert the 60hz and lower signal to 120Hz/240Hz using frame interpolation) and allow the 24p signal to be shown with little processing.

--HDTech

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Same issue
by DirtyP428 / December 25, 2011 11:49 AM PST

Does that mean that the tv is showing in 1080p despite the display saying 60i? When I hit info, the needle in the box in the lower right hand is in the middle between led tv and conventional tv. What exactly does that mean?

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Same issue
by Samsung_HD_Tech Samsung staff / December 27, 2011 6:23 AM PST
In reply to: Same issue

DirtyP428 -

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Samsung Smart Tv
by 8485maa / May 31, 2012 3:03 AM PDT
In reply to: Same issue

My parents purchased a Samsung Smart tv w/specifications reading 1920x1080 120i on the box and receipt, but the info on the tv displays 60i instead of 120. Why? I have read other comments...but does not convinces me. I have seen better quality pictures with less specification I mentioned above.

Thanks for your time to answer this question.

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Slightly different explanation
by Samsung_HD_Tech Samsung staff / May 31, 2012 3:55 AM PDT
In reply to: Samsung Smart Tv

8485maa,

The info box shows information on the incoming signal; it does not reflect what the TV is doing to enhance the picture.

The "i" after 60 in the info box is indicating that the signal being received is a standard 60 interlaced frame signal. The United States standard broadcast signal is 30 frames per second. Each frame is made up of two interlaced frames, 60 interlaced frames form the standard 30 frames per second.

Hope that helps!

-- HD Tech

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60 or 240?
by srstengel / August 18, 2013 11:16 AM PDT
In reply to: Same issue

I have the same question, but may I phrase it a different way. I bought a new TV that is supposed to be 240i. However, every time I turn on the TV, it says 60i. How can I be sure that I actually have a 240 TV? It doesn't say anything on the box and there are no instructions that came with it. It's a 6030FH, I think. Are you telling me that, even though it says 60i on the screen, the TV is automatically converting it to 120 or 240, or whatever the maximum frame speed is?

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Re: 60 or 240?
by Samsung_HD_Tech Samsung staff / August 19, 2013 9:07 AM PDT
In reply to: 60 or 240?

Hi srstengel,

As I mentioned above, this indicates the signal the TV is receiving, not what it's displaying. The TV is receiving a 60i signal, but it's displaying this at its native frequency. So if your TV has 240 Hz panel, as you said, that means it's showing you 240 frames in a period of one second. So the TV will show you the same image for 4/240th of a second if you have the TV in normal mode. If you have Automotion Plus on, it will attempt to interpret the additional frames in between so that it reduces choppiness in high motion scenes.

HD Tech

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1920X1080/60i
by Macbill4 / January 28, 2013 12:42 AM PST

I agree that this seems deceptive. I paid about $200.00 more for 120Hz vs. a 60Hz, but it appears I am only getting 60Hz. The plate on the back of my Samsung says 1080 and 60Hz. So did I really pay for a 120Hz and only get 60Hz?

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Let's hope you find a good answer.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / January 28, 2013 12:50 AM PST
In reply to: 1920X1080/60i

The 120Hz is the panel rate and it allows 24p playback. All HD content over HDMI tops out at 60Hz so they came up with faster panels to get more features such as 24p playback since 24 can be evenly be divided into 120.

For 60 they can use the second frame for motion smoothing.

So you paid for 120 and you got it. What you didn't get was an explanation. Mine is only 1 of a few thousand explanations.
Bob

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Then Why do Plasma and CRT have smoother pictures.
by bonesy1967 / January 1, 2013 8:32 PM PST

I understand your explanation. According to the explanation MY Samsung LED TV should work flawlessly. After all the signals sent are at a lower HZ than the TV claims to produce. If that's the case, then why does an old Cathode Ray Tube, or plasma appear so much smoother and with less artifacts and jidder?

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For your research.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / January 2, 2013 12:37 AM PST

Look at the phosphor decay rates and more. The move to digital everything is not without change in the displays and some miss the old CRT.

This is a very old discussion and your post is a good one. It's something of a statement about how this is 2 steps forward and 1 step back.
Bob

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