TVs & Home Theaters forum

Question

What digital video format is best for burning DVDs?

by motomcgee / June 26, 2012 3:57 AM PDT

The following post is about file format or conversion, prior to burning on a DVD; with the ability to watch in a regular, modern, Blu-Ray player. I am not attempting to violate any laws, I am not doing this for profit, etc. This is a personal use only question.

I've tried to find the answer in the forums; however, everyone is confused and confounded about the simple DVD-R / DVD+R / etc... questions.

I know what DVD Disc to use - I am referring to file conversion prior to burning? Do most modern Blu-ray / DVD players, have a specific, preferred, format?

For instance, these are currently in Windows Media Format. Should I maintain that format or convert to avi, DivX, AVCHD, MPEG-4, MOV, etc... I'm not sure what AVCHD even is; however, I do remember seeing it on BD-Player boxes (most current models), but also recall seeing DivX.

I have never had luck with DivX, the whole burning the software to disc in inserting it into the BD-Player, before using, etc...confusing Sad

Is .mov or MPEG-4 consistently recognized formats on a finalized disc?

Also, these were downloaded and purchased in HD and my player/TV is 1080P HD...how do I use that in my consideration in conversion? Which format will keep the best, original HD quality and SRS Dolby Digital sound?

Thank you for your assistance!

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All Answers

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Answer
None it seems.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / June 26, 2012 4:00 AM PDT

HD on DVD is not a standard. Your BD player will set the rules of what works.


"Is .mov or MPEG-4 consistently recognized formats on a finalized disc?"

No. The BD PLAYER decides this. There is no accepted standard except BD for HD. You can guess why. If you don't know why, I can answer but it is unpopular.
Bob

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Ok....Thanks...How about...?
by motomcgee / June 26, 2012 4:52 AM PDT
In reply to: None it seems.

Thanks for your response. Yes, that does make total sense. HD is not standard on DVD - dumb question. That is why there is DVD up scaling - right? Wink (Rhetorical).

Ok. So, of course, the BD Player will decide what is playable and not playable...however, in your experience or knowledge base (with so many brands)... Is there a universal accepted format or a "most popular format" readable by a BD-Player? For instance, all Sammysong brands are known for being AVCHD compliant, while all LGEE brands are DivX compatible. Maybe SonicPan will play WMA files.

Perhaps files burned in MPEG 4 will be playable on any BD-Player.... Am I making any sense? Besides my made up names of Brands? Mike

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Frankly?
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / June 26, 2012 4:59 AM PDT

I put the MPEG-4 and AVCHD files I find on the DVD and test it. It's a shame we can have the model you are targeting so we can make this work.
Bob

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Answer
Do most modern Blu-ray / DVD players, have a specific,
by ahtoi / June 26, 2012 2:08 PM PDT

preferred formats? The answer to that is..yes. Although I don't know what it is but there is a "standard" for each. I am not familiar with AVCHD but I am familiar with Divx. Divx is pretty popular but it is not the "standard". The reason I don't use that format now is because it take too long to encode it. I don't do much with BD either, because I don't have the software for it. I have done some HD in divx long before HD was popular. Of course I could only play it with my computer because I didn't have a hi-def TV at the time. You said you never had luck with divx...what do you mean by that?

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No.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / June 27, 2012 4:19 AM PDT

DivX is a copy-righted encoding and to put it into the BD players the maker has agreements and more to arrange. So not a standard.

There is a standard for Video DVD (not HD!) and Video BD but you are not using those standards so all bets are off since anything else is machine/maker dependent. The DivX question is too easy to answer as I was there during some discussions where the company that markets DivX was pitching it as the solution for HD on DVD.
Bob

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What I am missing in this discussion is...
by Pepe7 / June 27, 2012 6:28 AM PDT
In reply to: No.

...whether or not the OP is intending to play back data files with a Blu Ray player (with Blu Ray media burned as data discs), or author specific types of video files from a PC, such as .MOV, .WMV or .MP4 as Blu Ray discs to be played back seamlessly with any standard Blu Ray player(?)

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