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Wanting to connect my Compaq desktop to my wireless network

by tech_fantatic / August 27, 2006 1:14 PM PDT

I want to connect my compaq desktop to my wireless Linksys network. Currently I don't think my PC has wireless, so I need to make it wireless.

I've never opened a case before, so I don't think I am really comfortable enough to do that. So, I was hoping to get by with something like a USB antenna. Basically the computer is going to go in a back room, my router is in my office, so a basic diagram may look something like this:

[ comp ]








So to explain this. My computer is going to be in the back there. (First thing listed) Then there are two doors coming in my house (the X's) Here you wenter my living room, the dashed line off to the right is an open bar that goes about waste high. On the opposite end of the doors is the wall of my living room. The angled dash line does not represent a wall, but the entrance into my office. I have two computer and a laptop in hear with the router in the corner. So far the only computer that is wiress is my laptop, and it works fine on my linksys. (NOTE: The periods are only there because the diagram split up otherwise.)

So, what I am needing to know is if my computer will be able to work off of a router connected through a USB or something that doesn't require me to open the case.

I was looking at the Linksys USBBT100, but it says it is Bluetooth and connects devices, so I don't know if I would be able to get online with my router, but it seems have a good range and everything.

And advice you can give would be great.

If you think I have to open the case, what is involved and how risk is that for the PC (i.e. me destroying it!)


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re: Wanting to connect my Compaq desktop to my wireless netw
by arch85 / August 27, 2006 1:54 PM PDT

you can get usb wireless network card and connect to your wireless network with that; they cost like 20-30 bucks now-a-days I believe.

Linksys WUSB11, or,
D-Link DWL-G122, or,
TRENDnet 54Mbps 802.11G Wireless USB Adapter, or,
Linksys WUSB54G, etc ...

hope that helps

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Thanks for your answer
by tech_fantatic / August 27, 2006 2:16 PM PDT

I was hoping to be able to with a USB, but have heard that it probably won't work because of the walls between my router and the actual computer and also the distance. I would say it is at least 30 feet between the two. Is this still going to be an option.

Also, I have a speedbooster router, but I'm not sure if the speedbooster wireless card is worth the extra. My computer is slower and I would like to speed it up, but not sure if it will make much difference.

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A test
by linkit / August 27, 2006 5:01 PM PDT
In reply to: Thanks for your answer

What linksys router do you have?

Temporarily move your wireless laptop to the back room where your soon-to-be wireless desktop is. How strong is the signal from the router?

It sounds like the other router you have is a Linksys WRT54GS (the SpeedBooster router). It's a good one. Any wireless-b or wireless-g network adapter from a big name networking company (Linksys, D-Link, Netgear) should be able to connect to it. Paying more for SpeedBooster wireless network adapters is not worth it, IMO.

30 feet is not a problem for your typical wireless router. There are some things that can make for a weak broadcast signal (wireless phone interference, microwave ovens, thick walls, very long distances), but these can be overcome. Your house looks to be no problem for any wireless-g router from Linksys.

I'd get a USB 2.0 wireless-g network adapter. Adding a an internal wirelesss-g PCI card adapter in a desktop is not difficult, but there is one slight drawback--you can't position the antenna as easily as you can with a USB adapter on the end of a USB cable. This sometimes helps to better receive the router's broadcast signal.

Keeping the router and adapters from the same company helps to ensure maximum compatibility, so Linksys would be my first choice for the adapter.

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The test worked
by tech_fantatic / August 28, 2006 1:08 AM PDT
In reply to: A test

The first thing I did was test my laptop in that room and I was able to get online just fine. As a matter of fact, someone walk talking on a cell phone in my living room at the time.

My laptop has an internal wireless card, so is that going to be considered better than a USB antenna?

Is there anything in particular I should look for?

I was looking at the USBBT100 and it seems to get really good reviews and has a good distance for strength, but it looks like it only does Bluetooth. Do you happen to know if you can connect to a regular router with this? This is what I was looking at:

I think I do want to stay with Linksys. I had a Netgear Router before and it seemed like I couldn't keep my connection for more than a day, then when I wanted wireless, I couldn't even get a netgear router to work.

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look for wireless-g
by linkit / August 28, 2006 3:51 AM PDT
In reply to: The test worked

Laptop internal wireless cards tend to do a little better than USB wireless adapters.

Bluetooth adapters, such as the USBBT100, are not for connecting to wireless routers or wireless access points (WAP). You wireless network adapter needs to be compatible with your wireless router or WAP. So, if you have a wireless-g router, you need a wireless-g (802.11g) network adapter. Also, make sure that the wireless adapter is capable of WEP and WPA encryption.

SIDE NOTE: Todays comomon standard is wireless-g (802.11g), which is backwards compatible with wireless-b (802.11b).

I have used many different Linksys adapters with success. Even though keeping everything in the Linksys family is a good idea, Linksys has always seemed to be a little more expensive; so, I have purchased the occasional rebate special or discount wireless-g adapter from CUSA, Staples, CC, and BB over the years. They work just fine.

Really, any wireless-g adapter model should work at 30 feet, even PCI models. I have used cheapo store brand wireless-g PCI adapters to connect to Linksys routers without a problem.

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Sounds great
by tech_fantatic / August 28, 2006 4:01 AM PDT
In reply to: look for wireless-g

That is what I was thinking with the Bluetooth, but wanted to make sure.

I plan to stick with Linksys because I have had (knock wood) good luck with them. Plus, I think they would work better.

Now I just need to keep my fingers crossed that the USB will work.

Thanks for your help!

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