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Resolved Question

w2k won't recognize new disks????

by uhoh_num2 / December 2, 2012 7:22 PM PST

Mornin' Folks,

Scenario: Using a w2k machine and OS = Pro and machine is just as old. Burner on it is a Lite-On LTR 48246s. Get new disks from store...go to format...machine keeps saying "insert disk into drive X".

Other scenario: format the disk in a win 7 with a 1.5 udf and by a miracle the w2k machine now reads and I'm able to open the disk, BUT:

Problem: can't/don't "have permission" to write to the disk. I'm kinda stumped and would like a workaround to this so that I have this capability on the w2k machine.

My theory: Download a cd burner software package that is compatible with w2k and the lite-on. So:

Solutions: Anyone???? Any and all advice heeded and followed....not to mention appreciated.


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All Answers

Best Answer chosen by uhoh_num2

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Seems proper to me.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / December 3, 2012 12:57 AM PST

And at NO TIME do I ever try to format and use such media as a drive. I can not help folk that are trying that.

I see CDBURNERXP still lists Windows 2000 if you need the usual CD/DVD recorder software.

Sorry if you want to do that old drive letter thing but it's something I can't help folk with. It was too unreliable and after a few folk told me it was my fault the data vanished or didn't work on other machines I decided it was too unreliable.

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I'm a diehard...
by uhoh_num2 / December 3, 2012 6:38 PM PST
In reply to: Seems proper to me.


Thanks for the software recommendation. As for the format/burner/cd drive thing...just call me a old one maybe, but still dogged in determination. Can't tell I was brought up by Depression Era parents that never threw anything out, used all till it fell apart, lol, then sewed or patched it back together....can you? If nothing else, it got the older windows brain working (No!, not 3.1, started there though) and thinking.

Thank You Sir,


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No problem.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / December 3, 2012 11:55 PM PST
In reply to: I'm a diehard...

Given that we can use the usual recorder apps, we can get it working. I hope you see why I no longer assist with the optical media as a disk drive method/system. Folk later came back with the flame thrower to my help saying it was my doing the data was gone or didn't work with other PCs.

Wait a moment, I did issue that warning. Not that it mattered to them.

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