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Using USA-bought TV overseas - multiple questions..

by sguven / November 5, 2013 3:24 AM PST

Hello CNET!

Before the upcoming black friday / cyber monday sales, I have a few questions I would like to ask the experienced members of your community.

I currently reside in the USA and I will be permanently moving to Cyprus in Europe in a few months.

I am planning to purchase a high-end HDTV and my market research is showing me a price difference up to %300 of the prices in USA (I will also be able to bring my belongings customs/tax free).

I have also done the research on NTSC and PAL formats. Before I make any purchase decision, I would like to ask your opinions on these questions.

1. Is there any way to use an NTSC TV purchased in the US in a European country, to watch TV channels, through a satellite/cable box connected to the TV? If the cable box or satellite box is being connected to the TV through the HDMI cable, does this mean that the NTSC/PAL different wont play a role, or would it still not work?

2. Which cable connection type would override this problem?

3. Are there any TV's sold in the United States, which would be "compatible" or "supported" for the PAL system used in Europe?

4. I see that there are many different PAL/SECAM/NTSC converters sold on the market in the USA today. My question is regarding the depenability of these as well as the quality of the picture - Would any of these converters give me Full HD quality sound and picture, or would there be a compromise?

5. I currently own a Samsung HT-E6500W 5.1 3D Home Theater System - would this be used in any way to overcome this PAL/NTSC problem?

6. The TV purchased in the USA will also need a voltage converter unit to work in Cyprus - What is the general feeling on the dependability of these converters? Do you think they carry any risks or would they lessen the expected life of the TV in any way?

7. Does NTSC/PAL format difference of a TV also affect the compatibility of a gaming console, such as the upcoming XBOX One? Would a us-purchased Xbox one work on any TV or would it require NTSC?

Thank you in advance for all your answers..

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Best Answer chosen by sguven

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NTSC is dead; buy a multi-system HDTV here
by Pepe7 / November 5, 2013 11:36 AM PST

We have moved to ATSC. And Europe will be using DVB-T, so you may run into a few issues from the get-go, even with crazy converters (#4).

Visit/post @ AVS for more details. It's a complex topic. The following thread will lead you to purchase an HDTV while there, or find a speciality e-tailer who can sell you a multi-system HDTV at US prices.

http://www.avsforum.com/t/989757/using-an-american-tv-in-sweden-atsc-and-dvb-t

The good thing is, the HDTVs there (most of them anyway), will accept a 60Hz video signal, as well as the rest of our video specifications. OTOH, normal HDTVs sold in North American only accept 60Hz and not 50Hz, as is used in Europe. Many of the conversion solutions formerly used for PAL > NTSC won't help you since now it's DVB-T, and your American HDTV uses ATSC. See this post in the above thread-

<span id="INSERTION_MARKER">http://www.avsforum.com/t/989757/using-an-american-tv-in-sweden-atsc-and-dvb-t#post_20754278

The middle ground might be to purchase a multi-system HDTV here (#3). The selection won't be as great, but you would have the necessary technology to use it there and here, but likely pay less than you would in Cyprus, AFAIK.
There's a great company here in Chicago who sells all sorts of neat multi-region electronics. Example:

http://www.220-electronics.com/samsung-ua50eh6000-55-multi-system-led-tv.html

Buying guide-
http://www.220-electronics.com/multi-system-tv-buying-guide.html

<div>

Relocation info-</div> http://220electronics.wufoo.com/forms/z7x3p3/

I've purchased probably a dozen or so various disc players from them over the years. Over the phone & in person help is great IME. Amazon may have a few of these disc players for slightly less though, but w/o support.

If you have any other questions feel free to ask.

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thank you.
by sguven / November 5, 2013 10:16 PM PST

Excellent information, thank you so much.

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No worries ;)
by Pepe7 / November 5, 2013 11:30 PM PST
In reply to: thank you.

And I almost forgot to ask- out of curiosity, why are you being relocated to Cyprus (of all places)? Wink

cheers

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:P
by sguven / November 6, 2013 1:30 AM PST
In reply to: No worries ;)

It is where I am from originally, I have been in the US for work for past 5 years and its time to go back. With all the customs and taxes, a TV sold by a retailer in the US for $3200 is sold for around $8000 in Cyprus, which is why I am spending a considerable amount of time researching into this issue -_-

I am now doing the research on the multi-system tvs and hopefully the issue will be resolved that way. I will also contact the cable company in Cyprus which features HD broadcast services through subscription - however I am not sure with HD broadcast if it will be guaranteed to work on these multi-system tvs..

Where do these multi-system TV's stand in the discussion of the "50hz - 60hz compatibility" debate?

Thanks once again for your help.

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Wow, that's expensive
by Pepe7 / November 6, 2013 4:00 AM PST
In reply to: :P

Now I completely understand your quest here Wink

If the cable company in Cyprus can simply let you know what hardware/system they are using, it should be fairly straightforward. It's either DOCSIS or IPTV. Considering the multi-system HDTVs can handle essentially anything you throw at them, it should bring on few if any hurdles, compatiblity-wise. American HDTVs only handle 60Hz content, but Euro-HDTVs can handle both 50 & 60Hz content.

You can always take a peek at wikipedia for the basics, and more technical explanations if you read down in their bibliographies at the end of the article(s). Here are a few links to help you understand the differences:

Digital Television
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_television

ATSC
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ATSC

DVB-T
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVB-T

PAL
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PAL

DOCSIS (standard used by the cable companies in their boxes)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DOCSIS

I see Cablenet is using DOCSIS3 in Cyprus. (Maybe that's the company you have in mind?) That's what we use here in the U.S. (Comcast, etc.) Whatever box they provide you with, it should work fine via HDMI with your multi-system HDTV.
http://cablenet.com.cy/about-us-2/

hth,
Pedro

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hmm
by sguven / November 6, 2013 10:43 AM PST
In reply to: Wow, that's expensive

Pedro, thanks again for the wonderful info. It is certainly making the decision easier for me.

Now regarding the DOCSIS/IPTV part of your reply, I am a little confused - does it matter if the tv is multisystem whether it is one of these, or would this only affect the decision if I am to go with a US tv?

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You should be good to go
by Pepe7 / November 6, 2013 12:49 PM PST
In reply to: hmm

A multi-system HDTV should be able to handle nearly anything, as long as you are using either a cable or sat box. They won't have built in ATSC tuners, but again that's what the set top boxes are for in the U.S. Acquiring a model with DVB-T tuner built in would let you tune in some stations w/o having an external box. If you have any doubts, call them up. But get your info from Cyprus from the cable company first(!) Very nice and helpful folks @ 220v (& @World Import too). I even felt comfortable sending my in-laws there to pick up equipment when I was travelling and could not give them technical assistance.

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very well,
by sguven / November 6, 2013 10:28 PM PST

Now the problem is the pricing of the multisystem ones. i want everything, without no sacrifices! Silly

Take for example, the Samsung UN65F8000, that is sold on amazon. Going back to the beginning of our discussion (sorry if I am making you repeat anything):

IF I go to Cyprus and get subscription to a HD channel service, which I will connect it to the TV through a box, (the company I will use is Digiturk, with its local branch in Cyprus, info is here: http://digiturkkibris.com/en/high-definition-hd1), since the connection will be through HDMI cable, does the NTSC/ATSC/PAL really matter at all? What about the 50hz/60hz debate? What about the DOCSIS/IPTV?

If none of these things matter and I will be able to view the channels that Digiturk HD is going to give me (I do not care about the local channels that you get without the box, through the tuner), then I would simply get an american TV with an excellent cyber monday / black friday deal, and then just worry about the voltage.

What is your thoughts on this?

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I thought we already covered this? ;)
by Pepe7 / November 6, 2013 11:47 PM PST
In reply to: very well,

Are you reading/studying what I posted above, including all the links(?) 8-)

**Bottom line for you to focus on in this discussion**

American TVs won't work since they don't handle the European formats. Most of what they sell on Amazon is a non-starter for that reason. The turk box will be outputting 50Hz content, but the American HDTV can't handle it. You will have to go w/ the slightly higher priced multi-system HDTVs, which do fine w/ 50Hz content from either a Euro DVB-T (satellite) box or Euro Cable box.

See Samsung manual for the US version of this TV to see what it supports-
[url=http://downloadcenter.samsung.com/content/UM/201308/20130812135102463/[ENG_US]FP9ATSCF-3.104.pdf]http://downloadcenter.samsung.com/content/UM/201308/20130812135102463/[ENG_US]FP9ATSCF-3.104.pdf
(*notice there's no support of 50Hz)
<div>

Similar 65" Euro version (both 50Hz & 60Hz frequencies are supported)
[url=http://downloadcenter.samsung.com/content/UM/201304/20130413105554609/[ENG]FPDVBEUF-1.004-0401.pdf]http://downloadcenter.samsung.com/content/UM/201304/20130413105554609/[ENG]FPDVBEUF-1.004-0401.pdf







</div>

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got it thanks
by sguven / November 7, 2013 1:18 AM PST

I did check the links but at some point was getting lost about the hdmi cable and the issue with the frequency of the content Silly

Your sentence makes it crystal clear, thanks again! Multi-system TV it is!

Do you think they would have any kind of Black Friday / Cyber Tuesday deals? If not, what would be the best time to get it? Before xmas, after?

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Nope. That's for the standard US version products
by Pepe7 / November 7, 2013 8:15 AM PST
In reply to: got it thanks

You would have to inquire of the sellers to see if they can let you in on when they might drop their prices to get your business. Besides 220 volt that I posted, also call World Imports (see google for links- search 'multi-system HDTVs').

I would also check AVS forum to see if anyone there has any tips. My gut feeling says you should simply pay the prices there to get what you want while it's in stock. Remember, they aren't moving as many of these items so there's no reason for them to stock massive quantities like Best Buy would (for example).

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Let me comment about warranties and "smart tvs."
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / November 7, 2013 9:36 AM PST
In reply to: got it thanks

If you read the usual forums you find folk that bought in some country, moved and then need service. They flame every maker about having to ship it back to the country of origin for service. So even the smallest of issues can cause any savings to evaporate.

And then we have "smart tvs." Almost all are regionalized and one maker even goes so far to read a hardware code to lock down use to the region the set was supposed to be in.

This is why I feel that a smart tv is worth the same as a non-smart tv of the same size and picture quality. The makers have not so hidden agendas which bring the value of the smart tv to zero. Google Samsung PIA for an example.
Bob

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smart tv and warranties
by sguven / November 7, 2013 11:06 PM PST

Pepe and Bob, thank you for your patience with me and your replies.

Currently my setup in the house is like this:

My high-end pc is connected to the receiver of the 5.1 sound system, as well as the cable box. Output from sound system goes to the TV. I either watch the channels on the cable, or I get streaming from my PC.

For my next TV purchase it will be a similar setup, with the addition of the Xbox One.

I never, never ever use any of the features of the Smart TV (since most of those stuff I can do through my PC) and I am absolutely not interested in the 3d tv.

However my research (this stands true for both multi-system tvs and American tvs) i showing me that most of the newest and high end models pretty much -force- you to get this smart tv and 3d tv features, which is unnecessarily increasing my price.

All I am looking for is a system with the best picture quality, minimum input lag for xbox one, and DLNA compatibility if I want to go that route.

With this in mind, would you be able to recommend me a good multi-system tv? Or an American one, so I can have a point of comparison?

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Sorry- I couldn't post at the end of the thread
by Pepe7 / November 8, 2013 1:59 AM PST
In reply to: got it thanks

The thread already maxed out, so I put my current reply here.

(I've cut and pasted the post I'm replying to below, btw.)

See my reply to Bob regarding DLNA. It stinks. You have a Windows PC, so you are good to go already.

You are correct regarding the 'welded on' SmarTV/3D features in most cases. Especially if you are looking at the higher priced/larger panels (a la 65"). Simply use what you need to on those HDTVs.

I will be blunt again though. It won't be easy necessarily to find reviews of such HDTVs in multi-system form. There's no telling what shortcuts or different builds/features are in those sometimes. And since they aren't sold @ BB/Costco/etc., it may require some serious detective work to determine which HDTV suits you needs. Even more so for lag time, etc.
A web site such as AVS would perhaps be a better place to hook up with folks more knowledgeable in the qualities of the multi-system versions of major manufacturers such as Samsung. This lack of general information may lead you to drive a couple hours to actually see one of these in person and test it out in a rogue store who had it on display. Are you located near a major urban area of the U.S. currently? AVS might be able to help you find a dealer where you reside.

FWIW, if you look at Samsung in the 50-55" sizes, you would be saving quite a lot, from looking at the web sites I posted in this thread. 60-65" really starts to get expensive in the higher end 8000 series.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pepe and Bob, thank you for your patience with me and your replies.

Currently my setup in the house is like this:

My high-end pc is connected to the receiver of the 5.1 sound system, as well as the cable box. Output from sound system goes to the TV. I either watch the channels on the cable, or I get streaming from my PC.

For my next TV purchase it will be a similar setup, with the addition of the Xbox One.

I never, never ever use any of the features of the Smart TV (since most of those stuff I can do through my PC) and I am absolutely not interested in the 3d tv.

However my research (this stands true for both multi-system tvs and American tvs) i showing me that most of the newest and high end models pretty much -force- you to get this smart tv and 3d tv features, which is unnecessarily increasing my price.

All I am looking for is a system with the best picture quality, minimum input lag for xbox one, and DLNA compatibility if I want to go that route.

With this in mind, would you be able to recommend me a good multi-system tv? Or an American one, so I can have a point of comparison?
next unread

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a visit to the store
by sguven / November 9, 2013 1:36 AM PST

I made a post in AVS however I did not get any replies in the last two days, maybe the way I presented the questions were not nice.

Regarding the DLNA: I was hoping for an arrangement where the main living room tv would be connected to the pc with cables, but lets say maybe to have another tv in kitchen which would be wirelessly connected.. Not sure how feasible/possible those are, but I guess that is something that I can always look into later. Now the question of TV choice remains.

So, I visited the store dubbed "Amazon Showcase" today to check out the TV's. First of all, I was quite surprised with the size of the 60-65 inch tvs, and I think even an 55'' one would work for my needs.

Secondly, looking at how the quality of the picture can vary among different models, I am having second thoughts about buying the multi-system TV without a chance to view it in person. I live in NYC and visiting those stores in IL would not be possible. I called B&H superstore and they seem to only carry models up to 32 inch for multi-system.

My new question is regarding the 4k tvs.. The store had about 20 tvs on display, and of course in the middle of it all they had this amazing showcase for the 4k with a motion picture on it that mesmerized me. ALL the rest of the tvs had this computer generated ad on it which displayed the stores deals, from which you could not really judge quality - I think they felt in shame to put them next to the 4k one Silly

Now from my years of building my own custom desktop computers, I know a thing or two about content lagging behind tech. My question is regarding your views on how fast you think 4k content is likely to catch up, in the form of movie disks or streamed content from pc or cable tv. I really do not want to make a $4000 investment into a nice tv now, only to have it obsolete in one year.

What are your thoughts on the 4k investment right now, or simply delaying my tv purchase for another year and looking at my options in fall 2014?

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DLNA (just that.)
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / November 7, 2013 11:22 PM PST

Let's chat about DLNA for a second. It is many things to many people but let's get it out and through some light on it.

-> If you read forums where the developer of a DLNA server chats with users and contributors you inevitably learn that DLNA is barely acceptable for what most folk want. I can't guess what folk think DLNA is, but in its most basic specs, it's a POC. It was a pretty good idea when a TV was a TV but today folk expect more than what DLNA delivers.

Many DLNA servers have to work around vendor specifics and frankly a PC, Apple TV, XBMC, Xbox, PS3 is so superior that I have begun to ignore DLNA along with Smart TV features. It's true that for a better set you get DLNA, Smart TV but I'm finding myself turning it off.
Bob

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My thoughts exactly
by Pepe7 / November 8, 2013 1:42 AM PST
In reply to: DLNA (just that.)

And if the OP truly has a 'high end PC' already, DLNA won't matter much in the scope of what you can do with a basic HDTV used as a monitor.

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Answer
Link, comment.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / November 5, 2013 3:32 AM PST
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Answer
About 4K (just that.)
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / November 9, 2013 1:48 AM PST

I can't guess if you had the discussion about "the studios" and how they pushed back on Blu-Ray titles for fear of leaking HD content.

4K looks to be yet another round of debate where the studios hold back 4K content until they figure out a lot of issues.

-> There's a reason to not show same content on 1080p displays next to 4K content. That would make it easy to compare and a good retailer would want to maximize or amplify the 4K sales. Think about it.
Bob

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Agreed
by Pepe7 / November 9, 2013 10:11 AM PST
In reply to: About 4K (just that.)

4K makes little sense for 99.9% of HD viewers, and it probably will in four or five years as well. See Carleton-Bale charts for more 'facts' behind this assertion.

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re: a visit to a store
by Pepe7 / November 9, 2013 10:20 AM PST
In reply to: About 4K (just that.)

<sorry for="" replying="" this="" way,="" but="" the="" thread="" limits="" are="" most="" certainly="" dorked="" up.="">

AVS make take some time since you are posting a semi-odd topic.

For the kitchen TV, simply use a $75 media streamer box to connect to your main PCs media library. Done. DLNA won't do as much for you in this arena. Also, since you are into PCs, check out Plex & XMBC.
http://lifehacker.com/5991757/should-i-use-plex-or-xbmc-for-my-home-theater-pc

Glad to hear a 55" might work for you- it's still a great way to enjoy HT/HD ;).

Yes, I agree you should make every attempt at viewing the HDTV you intend on buying in person. The good thing is, you are in NYC, mecca of all things bought or sold (and drank or eaten too). VIsit more 'Chinatown'-like retailers for more multi-system options.

See my reply to Bob regarding 4K. Don't even worry about it now. Just buy an HDTV that can handle 1080p and suits are your other needs (PQ, etc.). I will be more blunt though- who gave you the vaguest impression that next year there will be massive amounts of 4K content available(?) Wink


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I made a post in AVS however I did not get any replies in the last two days, maybe the way I presented the questions were not nice.

Regarding the DLNA: I was hoping for an arrangement where the main living room tv would be connected to the pc with cables, but lets say maybe to have another tv in kitchen which would be wirelessly connected.. Not sure how feasible/possible those are, but I guess that is something that I can always look into later. Now the question of TV choice remains.

So, I visited the store dubbed "Amazon Showcase" today to check out the TV's. First of all, I was quite surprised with the size of the 60-65 inch tvs, and I think even an 55'' one would work for my needs.

Secondly, looking at how the quality of the picture can vary among different models, I am having second thoughts about buying the multi-system TV without a chance to view it in person. I live in NYC and visiting those stores in IL would not be possible. I called B&H superstore and they seem to only carry models up to 32 inch for multi-system.

My new question is regarding the 4k tvs.. The store had about 20 tvs on display, and of course in the middle of it all they had this amazing showcase for the 4k with a motion picture on it that mesmerized me. ALL the rest of the tvs had this computer generated ad on it which displayed the stores deals, from which you could not really judge quality - I think they felt in shame to put them next to the 4k one Silly

Now from my years of building my own custom desktop computers, I know a thing or two about content lagging behind tech. My question is regarding your views on how fast you think 4k content is likely to catch up, in the form of movie disks or streamed content from pc or cable tv. I really do not want to make a $4000 investment into a nice tv now, only to have it obsolete in one year.

What are your thoughts on the 4k investment right now, or simply delaying my tv purchase for another year and looking at my options in fall 2014?</sorry>

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Thanks Bob and Pepe
by sguven / November 9, 2013 11:49 PM PST
In reply to: re: a visit to a store

Well, I did some reading on 4k and I guess its too early to jump on the bandwagon.

I also did some serious reading into the plasma options, how some authors on cnet are recommending the panasonic ones before they stop producing them on march 2014, then I ran into some other reviews on the other websites where people are talking about the permanent burn-ins and I gave up completely on the plasma idea. (any thoughts on this would also be appreciated)

Now I did some comparisons between the multi-system tvs offered on the websites you recommended, as well as current deals on the us versions. One casepoint example:

Sharp LC60LE630M 60" Multi System LED TV - $1770 with shipping

Sharp AQUOS LC60LE650U 60" 1080p Smart LC-60LE650U LED HDTV with Wi-Fi US Version - $899 with shipping.

Now, the multi system vendor's return policy is a little scary, in the sense that you would not have a grace period to return it if you are simply not happy with it. They offer replacements for broken things under the warranty they offer, but my worry is about this multi-system enabling process = how am I to know if what they are doing to these tvs to get them work around the world will not affect its picture quality or other features? It feels like a leap of faith, with a price tag that is $800 more.

The US version above is 1 year newer than the 630 version mind you, and it seems like certain aspects were improved.

Now the question that remains is this:

Should I just go with the multi-system and gamble away and hope that the quality will be nice, and pay the $800 difference for peace of mind that it will work in fall 2014 when I move to Cyprus?

OR

Should I just get the US version for dirt cheap, and buy something like "Com World WGC-RF1080p" (did not want to post link directly to seller) which is for about $150? How likely are devices like this to:
a) Give me local channels that I can get without the cable box subscription?
b) Give me local channels with the digiturk cable box standard broadcast?
c) Give me local channels with the digiturk cable box HD broadcast?

I am leaning more towards the second option because i would get the US version of the TV with full super-retailer warranties as well as the option to return in 30 days if i am not happy with the picture. In the worst case that I cannot get the com world device to work in the a) b) c) options above, I guess I could just use it as a movie-from-pc and game console tv only..

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You just drove your car off the road
by Pepe7 / November 10, 2013 1:42 PM PST
In reply to: Thanks Bob and Pepe

Plasma vs LED/LCD, with all their merits re-hashed IMNSHO was probably better handled at the beginning of this thread Wink You can search back through this forum to find many, many comments by myself and others.
To make things easier, I would stick with the assumption LED for now since your selection is much better, especially if you are looking at multi-system HDTVs.

Regarding 'multi-system enabling process', you would benefit from stepping back ten feet and doing some reading back inside the links I posted. There's no "slight of hand" involved here like you might see with a cheap external PAL->NTSC converter (more comments on these later). It's a legitimate built-in ability to handle not only 50Hz Euro content, but also 60Hz, given that the US entertainment market produces/sells a lot of things you cannot find abroad, and they only come in 60 Hz content for our TVs in North America. Use those two Sharp HDTVs you posted as examples- the 50Hz will be handled similarly. Other factors regarding PQ fall into play besides 50/60. It's difficult to say if those two perform equally well w/o testing it in person. 50 vs 60 won't be an issue at all, but likely everyday things like contrast, brightness, color saturation, handling of motion scenes, etc. [You might compare PQ of a Samsung to a Sharp. There's going to be some differences. Hint: there's a reason why Samsung is popular.]

Keep in mind that it's likely Cyprus has already completely switched their local broadcasts to DVB-T (=digital). That 'Com World' product won't help you tune in anything if that is true. So having the ability to convert PAL to NTSC might not matter w/o having a tuner. Also, remember the occasional pitfalls of HDMI-HDCP. It's entirely possible that an HD or Sat box in Cyprus won't play nice w/ your US HDTV if you have a rogue converter in the middle. Personally, I would only use a Euro sat or cable box with a Euro or multi-system HDTV.

FWIW, the DVDO Edge is generally considered the consumer model scaler to buy for great quality. It can handle a lot more than PAL-NTSC too. Not cheap though at ~$600.
http://hometheater.about.com/od/audioandvideoaccessories/fr/dvdedgefull.htm

Another question regarding warranty- are you a dual citizen? If not, is an American HDTV warranty accessible to you? And how would you find service abroad for an American HDTV model? (Is it offered per their terms?)

My final thought- if the American version was cheaper, and only had 5% better PQ, would it still be worth the hassle of not having it be able to be easily used as a 'TV' while abroad(?)

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-_-
by sguven / November 11, 2013 4:15 AM PST

honestly, by this point it seems the wisdom of all the previous threads where the asker eventually gives up stands true..

even in my case, where i would be able to get it to the destination cost-free (both in terms of transit and customs/fees) the huge issue of warranty is the nail in the coffin for this idea.

I could get a good compromise US-TV for around $900 now which would suit all my needs for roughly a year, then probably just use it for nothing but gaming/streaming from pc. But then again I will have to buy ANOTHER brand new tv for the local channels (which will be important for wife to learn the new language of the country..)

OR I could get a multi-system TV for around $2000 which will have a year long warranty, meaning if it breaks on the 13th month of use (which has happened to my expensive headphones, sound system and many other devices!) I will be stuck with a TV with a complex system in a country where it will be impossible to get it repaired for a reasonable amount.

Once again thank you for your replies and patience with me, I gave up on my quest and will keep using my 40'' sony until I move next year Happy

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I guess I see your point
by Pepe7 / November 11, 2013 10:57 AM PST
In reply to: -_-

Although in the scheme of things, you should take a cold hard look at how often the $900 US HDTVs break down, just outside of their warranty periods. In this regard, there's not much difference, other than the hassle of having an HDTV that can't be used to watch television <ad nauseum, I realize>. And a < $1K difference in price isn't a lot huge for most folks I know relocating to Europe. A one shot deal anyway. (Heck, why spend *any* money at all on electronics/etc. since they could quite possibly break down(?)
8-)

I suppose you could spend the savings in getting the wife a Greek (or Turkish?) language tutor Wink

cheers

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streaming from internet
by sguven / November 13, 2013 1:37 AM PST

Pedro,

I managed to magically increase the budget to $1600 and I did some tests with my friends back in Cyprus for the streaming from the internet options for the local channels.

The results are very promising - for about $10 a month, I would be able to get a nice web-subscription which I can use to watch the local channels. The quality is not the HD you get in the ESPN sportscenter broadcasts, but as I explained before, the intention is for wife to get used to the language.

Right now I am looking at the Samsung F7100 series (US). I have spent many, many hours now reading the av forums website. People are talking about these issues of flash-lighting, and how the 60'' panel seems to be manufactured by Sharp, and how the 55 and 65 ones are different.

What is your thought on this flash-lighting issue?

The more I read about plazma, the more I get worried about the living room having too much light.
(here is a pic of our living room when it gets MOST light - notice its still kinda dark.. http://i.imgur.com/AdEzDLd.png)

The more I read about LED's, the more I get worried about this flash-light and view angle issues.

What is your opinion on all this "panel lottery" incident as well as the flash-lighting?

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Blinds
by Pepe7 / November 13, 2013 4:15 AM PST

The ambient light issue is quickly solved by using room darkening blinds. It's far from the brightest room I've seen with large plasma HDTVs.

Truth be told, I am not familiar with the 'flash lighting issue' or 'panel lottery' incident. Links or brief description you could share? It's true though that some panels are manufactured by different suppliers. And that can lead to differences. OTOH, all of these HDTVs have various nitpicky issues (even plasma). Some of them may happen to be more glaring to some than to others. YMMV.
Personally, you will likely be seeing more differences when you jump to the 8000 series than you would comparing a 55 w/ a 65 of the 7100. What else does the dedicated thread @ AVS have to say on this topic(?)

I'm just not seeing the viewing angle issue as something relevant for you in such a modest apartment/viewing space. It would be a different story if you had a huge room in a single family home. Or do you happen to have a thirty foot long couch hidden on the side opposite from the HDTV I see in the picture ;).

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avs
by sguven / November 14, 2013 6:24 AM PST
In reply to: Blinds

It is your fault that I am now spending 4 hours a day reading every single reply about the F7100 Happy

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1470900/official-samsung-unxxf7100-owners-thread/840

I am on the 29th page, 70 to go!

The issues with the panel lottery or flash lightning are subject of most of the discussions in that thread. It is also nice to start from the beginning and read through problems people had, which ones were fixed by firmware updates, and which ones not. I am also building a tips reference file by copy pasting good tips from users.

The room is very small, but the Cyprus room will be much, much bigger of course Happy I can still plan the seating units accordingly so that a 4 seater is right across from the tv.

I want to once again thank you for all the explanations in making this decision easy for me.

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