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Using a t-mobile phone on verizon network

by Aznzion / February 26, 2004 11:12 AM PST

Is it possible to use my t-mobile phone (samsung sgh-e715) on the verizon network? I hate t-mobile because of their horrible service but i dont want to switch to verison because their phone are bad. Anyway is this process illegal?

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Re:Using a t-mobile phone on verizon network
by tekelberry / February 26, 2004 12:32 PM PST

T-Mobile uses GSM, whereas Verizon uses CDMA. It would be impossible.

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Re:Using a t-mobile phone on verizon network
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / February 26, 2004 10:04 PM PST

It's this simple. If this is going to happen, you walk into a verizon store and put it simple.

"I'll switch to verizon if you can make this phone work on it."

Why not?

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Re:Using a t-mobile phone on verizon network
by limeyprat / February 27, 2004 12:19 AM PST

NO, your pretty much out of luck, despite what some people might say. The reason Verizon has better reception (A.k.a. "Can you hear me now? Good") is they use CDMA the old digital network which also has analog for when your out in the middle of nowhere. They've had time and money to build a good network. For the next year or two it will probably be the best network. Cingular was the first to go to GSM and when they start their network was really bad. T-mobile using the same tech, GSM, and some of the same cell towers as cingular.

CDMA and GSM don't cross. Verizon phones don't even have sim cards. The things that make one phone work with multiple GSM companies. Best bet find a phone you like and switch or put up with it and wait for the network to get better. If you realy, really, really like the phone try taking it to AT&T wireless they have GSM. But you'll have to get your phone unlocked.

Long winded for a NO, sorry.

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Re:Re:Using a t-mobile phone on verizon network
by Aznzion / March 4, 2004 9:57 AM PST

ok thanks for your response

but CDMA is old tech right? and the GSM is the new?

Im still confused about how a old digital network works better then GSM, and can you tell me what analog means? Sorry that i have to ask you these noobish questions for cell phone tech is not my kind of thing.

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Re:Re:Using a t-mobile phone on verizon network
by hh / September 2, 2004 6:50 AM PDT

I know you had asked this a long time ago, but here we go!
Yes, GSM is new technology in USA but used all around the world. Think of it this way, this country was wired to work on CDMA (Verizon, sprint, etc) and TDMA (ATT, Cingular, etc) and now some carriers are switching from TDMA to GSM and they have to put up towers for GSM network. Until they replace all TDMA towers with GSM, the latter will be spotty.
CDMA on the other hand is here to stay, and they are switching from Analog (old technology) to Digital (new technology). Same here, untill all towers are converted to digital signals, you will still need phones that work on old technology to function properly.
I hope that is clear.

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Re:Re:Using a t-mobile phone on verizon network
by dave1973 / September 2, 2004 11:25 AM PDT

T-Mobile was the first to introduce GSM to the United States. AT&T and Cingular coverted to GSM within the last year or 2. For those of you who live in areas served by US Cellular, they went from TDMA to CDMA, simply because of Verizon, Sprint, and Alltel to name a few carriers using CDMA. I have Verizon Wireless and have little trouble with the service, and reception is even better now that I switched from a Motorola 120c to a Samsung SCH-a650. My phone has analog for when I travel into areas still on analog, especially when I roam on Alltel in Michigan. Verizon's network in NW Indiana is nearly all digital since my phone reads "No Service" in most areas when I force the phone to switch to analog. As for the original poster who thinks Verizon Wirelesss' phones suck; as with all services, some work better than others. Samsung is working better for me than Motorola ever did, but you'll want Samsung SCH-a650 if you want a trimode phone [CDMA 800/1900 and AMPS (analog) 800)]. Kyocera is another good choice for reception. As for another poster who mentioned looking at AT&T if you want to keep the phone you have now on T-Mobile, just be aware that they're about to be acquired by Cingular, so you might want to look at their service instead of AT&T (if Cingular is already in your area) since AT&T customers will eventually be Cingular customers. I personally won't go with them after hearing my family complain about customer service problems with them.

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