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Using a Linux machine as a Windows Update server

by Adi / September 5, 2006 8:41 PM PDT

Is this possible? Happy

We have four XP machines running at home, and with a supposedly capped download limit on the internet per month, it would be nice if I could download the Microsoft Windows updates to a Linux machine and then have the XP machines connect to that rather than the internet to get their updates. It would save a lot of unnecessary downloading.

I have a machine ready to be Linuxed, and my intention is to put Debian Linux on it, unless someone thinks another distribution would be necessary or more appropriate to using it as a Windows Update server, if it is indeed possible of course.

I should mention that I have little experience of Linux so simple steps would be appreciated, or if anyone could direct me to a webpage which could help that'd be great (I haven't found anything as yet).

Thanks in advance,
Adi

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In short.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / September 5, 2006 9:25 PM PDT

You can put most if not all updates there.

However Microsoft does not offer a way for you to point the Windows Update feature to your new server. That is, there is no easy button here.

Bob

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Couple more questions
by Adi / September 5, 2006 9:36 PM PDT
In reply to: In short.

Thanks for your response Bob.

You say "You can put most if not all updates there." Is there any way of automating this though or is it a manual download-all-the-patches-every-time-they're-released?

"However Microsoft does not offer a way for you to point the Windows Update feature to your new server. That is, there is no easy button here."

I read that you could apparently use Microsoft 2000 (I think) as a Windows Update server, so that would suggest there is some way of directing it somewhere else. Is a registry edit possible perhaps?


Thanks,
Adi

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I went to a seminar on this and ...
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / September 5, 2006 9:55 PM PDT
In reply to: Couple more questions

While it was not the focus of the seminar they essentially discussed the IT staffer downloading the patches, putting them on a server, making install scripts for the user logons.

At no point did I find them automating the work of the IT staffer.

So for the users it was automated, but not for JoeIT.

As to Windows Update pointing to a Windows 2000 Server I think I heard of that years ago but I think that decision was reversed and haven't read/heard much of it again. You can google and MSDN more if you can find it.

Bob

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ipcop update acceraltor
by hytran / December 22, 2006 5:55 PM PST

put ipcop on a computer and use it as your router firewall. then install update-accelerator. When the first computer on the network goes to the microsoft update website the patches are downloaded (slowly as usual). Those patch files are then stored on the ipcop router and then when the next computer on the network goes to the windows update website, it will get the list of patches it needs, but they will then be delivered from the accelerator cache on the ipcop at lan speed.

Try it, it's great
Chris

http://www.ipcop.org
http://www.advproxy.net/update-accelerator/

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thank you
by johndazake / April 7, 2010 6:13 PM PDT

thank you brother

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