TVs & Home Theaters

General discussion

Upgrade To 1080p from 1080i - Is it worth the expense?

by lvpatrick / June 11, 2010 1:48 PM PDT

Given that 1080p and Blu-Ray technology is now the standard we would like to know if we would truly benefit by purchasing a new 1080p LCD HDTV and Blu-Ray player. Would the upgrade in video performance be worth the expense?

Here is a list of our current AV setup

1. Sony KDF46E2000 HDTV (1080i max)
2. Denon AVR 987 (1080p max w/HDMI 1.1)
3. Directv HD HR20-700 DVR (Directv Service) (1080p max)
4. Denon CD/SACD/DVD 2200
5. Toshiba HD-DVD HD-A1 (1080i max)
6. Infinity Alpha Series Model 50,37c,20 Speakers used in a 5.1 configuration
7. Valodyne VA2000 Sub-woofer
9. Monster Premium Cabling
10.Monster HT3600 Mk II Power Center

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I say if you intend to watch blu-ray then...
by ahtoi / June 12, 2010 2:18 AM PDT

I would definitely go for the 1080P. No doubt in my mind what-so-ever.

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1080p Only for Bluray and PS3
by FaithfulSinner / June 15, 2010 12:57 AM PDT

If you are like me and watch more HD TV than BluRay movies, then do not spend the money on upgrading. The difference is small as it is and you can only take advantage of 1080p with BluRays and PS3 games.

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1080i is a lie
by furjaw / June 18, 2010 12:52 PM PDT

The so-called 1080i sets were really 720p.
Their resolution is 1,366x768, 1,280x720, or 1,024x768.
1080p sets have a resolution of 1,920x1080.

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Your wrong !!
by davecon1 / June 19, 2010 12:54 AM PDT
In reply to: 1080i is a lie

1080i, the former king of the HDTV hill, actually boasts an identical 1,920x1,080 resolution but conveys the images in an interlaced format (the i in 1080i). In a tube-based television, otherwise known as a CRT, 1080i sources get "painted" on the screen sequentially: the odd-numbered lines of resolution appear on your screen first, followed by the even-numbered lines--all within 1/30 of a second.Improve golf swing

http://blog.hometheatermag.com/geoffreymorrison/0807061080iv1080p/

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Blu-rays will still look phenomenal at 1080i
by minimalist / June 19, 2010 1:32 AM PDT

Its not so much the 1080p classification that's going to make a difference in quality (I see very little difference between 1080p and 1080i signals on my 46" Sony). Rather it will be other factors such as a larger screen, higher refresh rate, local dimming, better black levels, etc that will really make the difference.

Especially black levels. I think far too many get bogged down in resolution when it has a very minor effect on picture quality compared with contrast ratio (and I mean static contrast ratio, not any of these ridiculously high "dynamic" numbers some manufacturers claim.

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Not worth the expense!
by Hi-def Jeff / June 19, 2010 2:25 AM PDT

Dear Ivpatrick,

The short answer is "No" but for several reasons.

1. There are still no "standards" in the industry. Many "recommendations" but no standards and no regulation of them.

2. Not long ago "HD" was the new standard. This new standard only came in 720 but we weren't told that, in a year, there would appear 1080i. Neither were we told that 1080p was just around the corner...

3. The picture quality should be better than before but you may not get as good of performance from your new TV due to some factors as mentioned by previous poster.

4. Have you considered the added expense of the Blu-ray content that you will need to purchase? A Blu-ray disc in a Blu-ray player is where you will most likely notice the difference. (vs 1080p satellite content)

IF everything is working well (sounds like it), AND you are unsure enough about the quality difference that you would ask here...

THEN, hang on to your money for now and watch what comes next.

After all this they're now trying to sell us 3-D HD (DON'T) and Sharp wants you to buy their new TV with the added yellow pixel! Don't fall for this, either! I went to see it and Sharp ought to be ashamed!!! Snake oil!

I hope this helps,
Highdefjeff

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no
by drdreww / June 21, 2010 7:13 AM PDT
In reply to: Not worth the expense!

no

nowhere even close. you'd not be able to tell which was which.

if you were buying now, i'd say get the 1080p. it's 60 hz rather than 30, screen is refreshed twice as often. i is a holdover from almost a century ago when the (analog) hw was not fast enough, so they split it into two.

besides, if you re-purchase everything every time they improved the product, you'll be back to the store every few months. for every product. until you go bankrupt. Happy with high-tech products, by the time you get it home, it's out of date. learn to live with it. Happy

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Some FYI to help you.
by jcrobso / June 23, 2010 7:09 AM PDT
http://www.abt.com/product/24947/Sony-KDF46E2000.html
Here is info on you HDTV. It is 720P set that will accept a 1080i input and rescale it to 720P.
How old is the TV? It looks to be about 4~5 years old, rear projector that has a lamp that will have to be replaced soon, or maybe you have done that all ready.
Today's back-lit LCD HDTVs will have better picture that your current HDTV, but 46" is just that starting point that you can see the difference. 5 years ago Rear Projection sets ruled, but not today.
In your case you do have a lot to gain by getting a new HDTV.
Sadly your old set does not have a lot of value as a trade in, maybe you put the old one in a different room?
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Some FYI to help you.
by jcrobso / June 23, 2010 7:33 AM PDT
http://www.abt.com/product/24947/Sony-KDF46E2000.html
Here is info on you HDTV. It is 720P set that will accept a 1080i input and rescale it to 720P.
How old is the TV? It looks to be about 4~5 years old, rear projector that has a lamp that will have to be replaced soon, or maybe you have done that all ready.
Today's back-lit LCD HDTVs will have better picture that your current HDTV, but 46" is just that starting point that you can see the difference. 5 years ago Rear Projection sets ruled, but not today.
In your case you do have a lot to gain by getting a new HDTV.
Sadly your old set does not have a lot of value as a trade in, maybe you put the old one in a different room?
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E2000 Age
by lvpatrick / June 23, 2010 12:44 PM PDT
In reply to: Some FYI to help you.

Our E2000 is 4 to 5 years old and has had the lamp replaced once. In fact it seems the new bulb is lasting longer than the original.

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OK, now more things.
by jcrobso / June 24, 2010 3:25 AM PDT
In reply to: E2000 Age

I have a 5 year old CRT RP HDTV that will do 1080i. Large screen LCD's just weren't in the market 5 years ago or at a reasonable cost.
So much has changed in 5 years, LCD tends to rule the market, costs have come way down. One of my daughters just got a 47" LCD (for around $900 and this is less than I paid for my RP set)and it has a better picture than my RP CRT. Direct view HDTVs tend to look better than RP ones, because you are looking at the image directly on the screen instead of a projected one. Rear projection TVs have a problem with ambient bright light, direct view LCD have much less of a problem.
Go to the store and spend some time looking.

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