TVs & Home Theaters

General discussion

TV antennas

by waterstruck / December 1, 2012 10:18 AM PST

I was going to tryt he whole hook up an antenna and see if I get any channels so I can drop my cable. One question I have is do I need a digital to analog converter if my TV is HDTV flat screen? I didn't think so but just wanted to check. Also, is this really worth trying? I checked to see how far the towers are at the FCC website and mine are only 4 miles away. SO I was thinking about trying an indoor amplified multidirectional antenna. The reading I did said the multidirectionals are good for under 25 miles from a tower and then an amplified would be good if one lives near trees or tall buildings etc, and I live next to the woods but the trees are not that tall so I guess I could go either way...Does anyone have any suggestions? Does this really work?

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Yes, It Works
by sunwatcher / December 1, 2012 11:23 AM PST
In reply to: TV antennas

Yes, you can receive HD broadcasts over-the-air with a good antenna if you live within range of broadcasters, no digital-to-analog converter necessary. I have a basic amplified antenna and can pick up around 20 HD channels, including all the major broadcasters. Since you live only 4 miles away, I would think you could get by without an amplified antenna. You don't need a special "digital antenna" either, as some are advertised. Some will even say "digital ready" but they're nothing more than regular VHF/UHF antennas. I would suggest starting out with a good quality inexpensive one. Remember that you will need to do an auto scan from your TV's menu after you hook it up.

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I don't know
by volvogirl / December 1, 2012 1:07 PM PST
In reply to: TV antennas

But my mother had a HDTV Flat TV but it wasn't digital so we had to get a converter box. It was long after the major switch to digital and it was hard to find a box. Hook up an antenna and try it first before buying the box. You know you would just be able to get your local channels. And the OTA (over the air) HD is even better than cable HD. Sometimes I even switch to Antenna HD instead of my Comcast cable box.

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She likely had an older model (EDTV)
by Pepe7 / December 2, 2012 8:10 AM PST
In reply to: I don't know

Not the same beast anyway.

Regarding reception of OTA HD, it *can* sometimes provide a better signal, just like Comcast can perform better in some areas (good vs crappy neighborhood buildiouts). Where I live anyway, there are simply too many obstructions to line of sight for OTA to work better than my Comcast cable box. YMMV, of course.

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