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Transfering HD from HD camcorder (SD card) to HD TV (DVD)?

by Tom Skipper / April 20, 2009 10:57 AM PDT

How or to what do you transfer HD (avchd) from a SDHD card (Canon Vixia HF100) to a source such as a DVD, via a computer? Is this the same as recording from a standard digital camera to a DVD. Can you play the DVD on a regular DVD player? Will it look anything like HD on a HD TV?
I don't have a Blue Ray, but my DVD player is progressive scan? I guess I just don't understand.
I want to upgrade from tape to digital and don't want to buy a camcorder that will be out of date by the time I get it, such as regular digital or HD digital.

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My nickel...
by boya84 / April 20, 2009 11:48 AM PDT
How or to what do you transfer HD (avchd) from a SDHD card (Canon Vixia HF100) to a source such as a DVD, via a computer?
Connect the camcorder to a computer with a USB cable. Camcorder in PC mode. Be sure to connect the AC power supply, too. The camcorder memory should mount like any other external mass storage device. Copy the video files to the computer.

Since you don't have a BluRay player connected to your HDTV and a regular DVD player cannot deal with AVCHD (MTS) format video, use a video editor that can deal with AVCHD (Sony Vegas and Adobe Premire for Windows; iMovieHD '08 or newer or FinalCut running on an Intel-Mac), you can import and edit, and get the video project out to a DVD authoring tool (like WinDVD for Windows or iDVD for Macintosh). That DVD authoring tool will downsample the video to standard definition VOB files that a regular DVD can deal with. Burn the regular DVD using that DVD authoring tool.

Is this the same as recording from a standard digital camera to a DVD.
I do not understand what a "standard digital camera" is. There are several recording media formats and file types in consumer-grade camcorders. DVD based camcorders record to very highly compressed VOB files for standard definition video - and AVCHD/MTS files for high definition; flash memory and hard drive camcorders record to very highly compressed MPEG2 files for standard definition and AVCHD/MTS files for high definition; miniDV tape records to not so compressed MPEG2/DV for standard definition or HDV high definition files. But I guess the short answer to your question is, yes.

Can you play the DVD on a regular DVD player?
Only if the files are in a format that "regular DVD" can understand - typically VOB files.

Will it look anything like HD on a HD TV?
No. But it still looks better than standard definition.

I don't have a Blue Ray, but my DVD player is progressive scan?
Great - doesn't matter. But at least you can connect using component cables.
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very helpful
by surfersam007 / March 27, 2015 7:08 AM PDT
In reply to: My nickel...

If I record HD video using a sonyz5 HD camcorder onto MiniDV and then want to use an old canon xl1 sd camera as a transfer unit for the MiniDV tapes to adobe premier pro on my computer. Will I be transferring or will the output be HD footage?

The reason being the sonyz5 doesn't transfer from camera to computer using firewire. So any clues on how to do this with premier pro?

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About page 102 in the product manual shows iLink (firewire)
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / March 27, 2015 7:15 AM PDT
In reply to: very helpful
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thanks bob
by surfersam007 / March 27, 2015 8:17 AM PDT

is it worth purchasing a hd playback device/tape player to do the job? do you know anything about these devices?

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I've done so much firewire transfer that
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / March 27, 2015 8:22 AM PDT
In reply to: thanks bob

I can't say I'd get a tape player since those cost as much as the camcorders. Since the manual shows transfer to the PC maybe it's something else this time. That is, sometimes you have folk that are new to firewire and are missing a cable, port or software. I can't tell this time but the camcorder is documented to transfer over firewire (let's not go over the Sony ilink/firewire discussion again.)

What do you think is missing here?'

This thread is more than 2166 days old. It may get unwieldy to work in such an old thread.
Bob

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The Sony HVR-Z5 does use firewire
by boya84 / March 30, 2015 1:53 AM PDT
In reply to: very helpful

to transfer from camcorder to computer... unless your Z5's firewire port is somehow broken - it is a 4-pin firewire port - also called i.Link, IEEE1394 and DV.

The Z5 can record in a couple of different formats - including high definition HDV and standard definition DV.

If the captured video is standard definition DV format (not Sony's DVCAM format), then using another standard definition miniDV tape playback device will be fine (assuming the record speed is SP, not LP).

If the captured video is standard definition DVCAM format video, then a Sony pro-device is needed to playback that tape.

If the captured video is high definition HDV format, a standard definition only DV format playback device (deck or camcorder used as a deck - in your case, a Canon standard def XL1 camcorder) will NOT be able to deal with the HDV format video. No playback no downsampling to DV...

We talk about the difference in writing the data to the digital tape if you want to go there. The XL1 had a large, 6-pin firewire connector. The small 4-pin IEEE1394 connector is just as "firewire"... You just need a different connector on the camcorder side. Could be a cable change or an adapter on the camcorder end of the cable.

There is also a 9-pin firewire connector - usually found on external drives and computers (Firewire800). We don't know anything about the device to which you want to connect the Z5...

Agree with Bob that HDV decks are more expensive than a camcorder. We need more information to understand what is really needed for your digital video importing.

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The 800 pound gorilla is...
by boya84 / April 20, 2009 10:51 PM PDT

"So what did I get a HD camcorder for?"

Optical disc in the form of DVDs is only one way to store video for playback. With computer and "media center" and other methods of storage and playback, I am skipping the next round of discs.

After the editing is complete, you can save the vide project files as computer-readable files like h.264 that will be in high definition. Many HDTVs have a VGA port to which you can connect a computer. Using the computer as the "playback deck", there is no need to burn a disc. Store the video files on a Network Attached Storage (NAS) device. In this case, you could store the files to flash memory, but that is expensive.

Devices like the AppleTV unit or even a MacMini can be the "media center".

This also brings the flexibility and cost effectiveness of miniDV tape back into the picture - though this does not apply to you... When the editing is compete and the various exports and renderings are done (at least one computer readable and one for regular DVD players), do one more - export back out to the miniDV tape based camcorder. This tape copy can be used as an archive or as a playback method (not both). For playback, just use the camcorder as the playback deck. at around $3 per tape and each tape capable of holding up to 63 minutes of 1080/HDV format high definition video, or up to 44 gig if it was on your computer's hard drive, it continues to be a cost effective off-computer storage mechanism.

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Transfering HD from HD camcorder (SD card) to HD TV (DVD)
by vincente4 / October 15, 2009 10:40 PM PDT

to transfer AVCHD HD to DVD, you need to copy the file from your HD camcorder or SD card to your computer then bring your avchd files in compliance with Blu ray by adding the extra blu ray files.

To fully bring AVCHD directory into compliance with Blu-ray, continue with the following:

* Create BDJO, JAR and AUXDATA directories in the BDMV directory; keep them empty
* Create BACKUP directory in the BDMV directory if it does not exist
* Copy index.bdmv, MovieObject.bdmv files and PLAYLIST, CLIPINF, BDJO directories into BACKUP directory
* Create CERTIFICATE directory in the same directory where you put BDMV directory
* Create BACKUP directory in the CERTIFICATE directory; keep these directories empty .


provided your original content is not more than 4 GB, you can then burn this to a regular DVD. Whe you play your DVD on computer,
most players will recocnise it as a Blu Ray Disc.
it on to DVD and it should play fine on any dvd

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