Speakeasy

General discussion

Tea Partiers are in an awkward position.

by JP Bill / December 4, 2012 4:46 AM PST

The only people they agree with are themselves, probably some of them don't agree with everything the other party members say.

...Boehner's plan, which was signed by other House Republican leaders including recent vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan, drew a sharp dismissal from Republican Sen. Jim DeMint of South Carolina, a leader of tea party conservatives in Congress.

"Speaker Boehner's $800 billion tax hike will destroy American jobs and allow politicians in Washington to spend even more, while not reducing our $16 trillion debt by a single penny," DeMint said.


They don't want the Democratic plan, they don't want the Republican plan...they don't have enough power to get their own plan through...I guess they sit on the sidelines and stir the pot/complain.

Post a reply
Discussion is locked
You are posting a reply to: Tea Partiers are in an awkward position.
The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Please refer to our CNET Forums policies for details. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Track this discussion and email me when there are updates

If you're asking for technical help, please be sure to include all your system info, including operating system, model number, and any other specifics related to the problem. Also please exercise your best judgment when posting in the forums--revealing personal information such as your e-mail address, telephone number, and address is not recommended.

You are reporting the following post: Tea Partiers are in an awkward position.
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.
Collapse -
Looks like they've learned a lesson
by Steven Haninger / December 4, 2012 4:54 AM PST

As I understand it, the Tea Party movement was founded by those who weren't eager to see all that money handed over to the government. Unfortunately, they were beaten back by a larger group of people who were very eager to see even more money handed over to the government...as long as it came out of someone else wallet, that is.

Collapse -
One of the Dem Senators
by TONI H / December 4, 2012 5:54 AM PST

was on Fox this afternoon and said that the public is of the belief that negotiations are going on behind the scenes and he said that couldn't be further from the truth........there are only five people involved in any of the 'talks'.......Geithner, Boehner, Pelosi, McConnell, and Reid. That's it. Nobody else is allowed to even know about the discussions until one of the bunch comes out to a microphone. That's why members of the Tea Party are upset.........and they aren't the only Republicans ticked off right now.

Collapse -
Other groups should form
by James Denison / December 5, 2012 4:15 AM PST

Separate from the leaders, create a "caucus" to discuss and address the matter and pressure to bring it onto the floor. That is one way to bypass an intransigence leadership or force him/her to change direction or loose their following.

Collapse -
It is funny how you have claimed conservatives should...
by grimgraphix / December 8, 2012 2:15 AM PST

... be listened to, because they are a majority with a mandate (at times you have claimed this... you can not deny it)... but now you are advocating a minority to be as obstructionist as they can be so as to hinder or bypass a majority leader.

I think you just enjoy being a stinker.

LOL

Wink

Collapse -
when you find your own group
by James Denison / December 8, 2012 4:20 AM PST

turning their back on you, what other choice do you have? They are no longer "one" with you. Factions within groups have always existed, the Democrats being the biggest example of that.

Collapse -
Yep.
by Kees_B Forum moderator / December 8, 2012 4:30 AM PST

Indeed, if Boehner finds these people do not agree with the party line, what other choice does he have? They are no longer "one" with him.
Well seen, James!

Kees

Collapse -
I've said for a long time
by James Denison / December 8, 2012 6:04 AM PST
In reply to: Yep.

we need another strong third party to shake up the system, bring back some sense.

Collapse -
Back when McCain and Lieberman both
by Roger NC / December 8, 2012 8:00 AM PST

were considering a presidental run and got eliminated, I had a bit of a hankering that they would offer themselves as a President/VP package to run on all the different third party tickets that had a place on various state ballots.

They couldn't have won, the election would almost certainly have gone to the House of Representatives and if I remember correctly, that would have been the same results as we obtain with the two party candidates.

Back then the two of them were as near the center of politics as any influential politician has been and I generally prefer moderates over right or left fanatics that seem to be taking over the Republican and Democratic parties.

Collapse -
In the UK ...
by Kees_B Forum moderator / December 8, 2012 7:16 PM PST

you see how difficult it is to make a strong third party, especially when (and that's the same in the USA) there isn't proportional representation (that's what Google Translate offers, I hope you understand) but a winner-takes-all in a constituency/district/state.

Needing it is quite different from getting it.

And what would you get in the (very) long run? My guess: a 60% middle party, with 20% for a left party and 20% for a right/conservative party sharing the totally powerless opposition together. I place you in one of those two 20% parties, by the way.

Kees

Collapse -
(NT) I'm not sure the middle party could get 50% right now
by Roger NC / December 8, 2012 11:01 PM PST
In reply to: In the UK ...
Collapse -
Re: middle party
by Kees_B Forum moderator / December 8, 2012 11:29 PM PST

Then 49% left, 49% right, 2% middle maybe?

Kees

Collapse -
(NT) 30 30 30? with the rest splinters.
by Roger NC / December 9, 2012 12:04 AM PST
In reply to: Re: middle party
Collapse -
RE:the Democrats being the biggest example of that.
by JP Bill / December 8, 2012 4:37 AM PST
Collapse -
Yep. good riddance
by James Denison / December 8, 2012 6:05 AM PST

Don't let the door hit you on the way out Charlie.

Collapse -
You two would get along just fine
by JP Bill / December 8, 2012 11:37 AM PST
In reply to: Yep. good riddance

You don't want him there...and he doesn't want to be there.

You can't fire him...he quit.

Collapse -
Boehner demoting Republicans who too conservative?
by Roger NC / December 4, 2012 7:28 AM PST
Effective next Congress, leadership pulled Kansas Republican Rep. Tim Huelskamp, Michigan Republican Rep. Justin Amash and Arizona Republican Rep. David Schweikert off committees from which they could exert conservative pressure on fiscal matters. Amash and Huelskamp were pulled from the Budget Committee and Schweikert from the Financial Services Committee.
Collapse -
form their own unofficial "committees"
by James Denison / December 5, 2012 4:16 AM PST

and raise some hell, scare the heck out of both leadership groups. Others will start to gravitate to them.

Collapse -
RE: form their own unofficial "committees"
by JP Bill / December 6, 2012 3:42 AM PST

and raise some hell, scare the heck out of both leadership groups


BOO!

Collapse -
Maybe, or they may bring on a different view
by Roger NC / December 8, 2012 2:25 AM PST

too opposite too many, and they'll be outlandish, perhaps even become viewed with suspicion as being subversive, cultish.

You tell enough people they are completely wrong, only you are right, and you're going to force everyone to agree with you, and you'll just as likely to end being viewed as dangerous as viewed as the salvation.

Even worse, you may end up believing you have to force others to agree, no matter how. That never goes over well for long.

Collapse -
hmmmmmm
by TONI H / December 8, 2012 3:47 AM PST

>>>Even worse, you may end up believing you have to force others to agree, no matter how. That never goes over well for long.<<<<

seems to work for BO

Collapse -
Re: not for long
by Kees_B Forum moderator / December 8, 2012 3:51 AM PST
In reply to: hmmmmmm

Probably for 8 years (only 4 more).

Kees

Collapse -
(NT) nothing is certain
by James Denison / December 8, 2012 6:06 AM PST
In reply to: Re: not for long
Collapse -
don't see how it's going well
by Roger NC / December 8, 2012 4:40 AM PST
In reply to: hmmmmmm

since everyone in Washington is totally self absorbed and self righteous, everyone else suffers.

Popular Forums
icon
Computer Help 47,885 discussions
icon
Computer Newbies 10,322 discussions
icon
iPhones, iPods, & iPads 3,188 discussions
icon
Security 30,333 discussions
icon
TVs & Home Theaters 20,177 discussions
icon
HDTV Picture Setting 1,932 discussions
icon
Phones 15,713 discussions
icon
Windows 7 6,210 discussions
icon
Networking & Wireless 14,510 discussions

Tech Tip

Know how to save a wet phone?

It's not with a dryer and it's not with rice. CNET shows you the secret to saving your phone.