Windows Vista forum

General discussion

Tax Time. Vista 64 owners watch out.

by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / January 23, 2009 1:01 AM PST

"#(supported) Operating Systems:

* Windows 2000 with Service Pack 4
* Windows XP (32-bit) Home/Media Center Edition/Pro with Service Pack 2 or higher
* Windows Vista (32-bit) Home Basic/Home Premium/Business/Ultimate
* Administrative rights required"

That's the list from Turbo Tax.

Please check that box BEFORE you buy it.
Bob

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Turbo tax
by flaminghotsauce / January 28, 2009 12:37 AM PST

is well marketed. We did ours on the TaxAct.com website, free filing, free upload, everything.

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Tax Cut works with Vista 64
by rpreason / January 30, 2009 10:03 AM PST

I've downloaded the H & R Block Tax Cut software from Amazon and it works just fine with Vista 64. Glad I didn't choose the Turbo Tax software.

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Tax Cut is the real deal
by cngoins / February 22, 2009 11:03 AM PST

I've been a tax cut user for four years now and with no issues. Its the best

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Has anyone tried it? I could swear that it worked last year
by Technojunkie3 / January 30, 2009 10:20 AM PST

Someone at Intuit needs a polite tap with the cluestick to clear this up.

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TurboTax - 64 bit
by msgale / January 30, 2009 11:48 AM PST

"TurboTax 2008 can run on 64-bit operating systems (OS) in 32-bit compatibility mode" - from TurboTax's web help. I am running it on Vista 64 Ultimate.

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TurboTax - 64 bit
by psdale4 / January 30, 2009 2:26 PM PST
In reply to: TurboTax - 64 bit

I have Vista 64 bit operating systems. How do you get in to run in 32-bit compatibility mode ?

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It should be automatic, like every other 32-bit program.
by Technojunkie3 / January 30, 2009 8:45 PM PST
In reply to: TurboTax - 64 bit

I can see why Intuit didn't bother with a 64-bit native version, there isn't much point for anything that won't really stress the CPU, but they should have specified 64-bit Vista compatibility.

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32-bit compatible mode
by darrenforster99 / February 20, 2009 4:32 PM PST
In reply to: TurboTax - 64 bit

Vista automatically runs 32-bit programs in this mode, you shouldn't need to change anything.

Although if it isn't running in 32-bit mode you can force it by right clicking on the program icon, selecting properties and going to the compatibility tab, then put a tick in the box "Run this program in compatibility mode for:" and choose Windows XP (Service Pack 2), this will force it to run as close to XP SP2 as it can get.

I use GNUCash though for my tax it's free, GPL, OpenSource and works fine with Vista 64

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Open letter
by 3rdalbum / January 30, 2009 5:56 PM PST

To the makers of Turbo Tax:

Please recompile Turbo Tax on a 64-bit machine. In case you haven't noticed, we're in 2009 now, 64-bit computing is not a passing fad, and it should take you less than an hour to release a 64-bit edition of your software.

Yours sincerely,

Today's Computing World.

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32 v: 64
by msgale / January 30, 2009 11:53 PM PST
In reply to: Open letter

When a 32 bit application is installed on PC running a 64 bits O/S it is automatically set in the correct mode. 32 bit applications are installed in "\program files (x86)" where as 64 bit apps are in "\program file\+...+? There are actually very few 64 Bit applications out there. Photoshop CS4 is 64 bit, but nothing else of CS4 is. Explorer is both a 64 and 32 bit application, but the 64 bit version is basically useless, since none of the standard plug-in work. MS Office is not 64 bit, nor is Visual Studio. I believe SQL Server is. Simply recompiling is but the first of many steps needed to convert an application from 32 to 64 bits. PS although Visual Studio is a 32 bit application it can build 64 bit apps.

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Thanks for adding that.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / January 31, 2009 4:52 AM PST
In reply to: 32 v: 64

However something is amiss with this application.

1. Turbo Tax is not supporting it on Vista 64.
2. Some are unable to run it on Vista 64.

Combine item 1 and 2 and you find people a little upset.
Bob

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FWIW, it installed OK on my 64-bit Vista SP1 notebook
by Technojunkie3 / January 31, 2009 9:12 AM PST

I had to do a manual update to get the Updater update, but other than that little hiccup everything is OK so far.

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64 bit Vista
by doc101 / February 22, 2009 7:27 AM PST

Am running TurboTax Premier on Windows Home Premium SP1 64 bit. There have been NO problems of any kind. I would be interested in knowing what difficulties others have had.

Doc101

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What does not work...
by ddb161 / March 1, 2009 12:25 PM PST
In reply to: 64 bit Vista

On mine, if you choose to let it look for updates upon startup, it NEVER finishes.

If you choose NOT to let it look for updates upon startup, it never gets past 'Scanning Forms'

Either way, it sucks. AND on TurboTax's specific answer to the 64 bit question, it says something about'so many variations','they are looking into it for the 2009 version'

As I said in their help feedback for the answer (that was not an answer) 'Geeze, what a copout'

Heck, even iTunes runs on my machine!


Vista 64 Ultimate, 6 Gig Ram, etc, etc.

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Updated: 2/18/2009Article ID: 6642
by msgale / March 13, 2009 11:32 AM PDT
In reply to: What does not work...

TurboTax 2008 can run on 64-bit operating systems (OS) in 32-bit compatibility mode.

I run it on Vista Ultimate 64, 12 GB - no probems.

PS Tax Cut (H&R Block) is not a 64 bit either.

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The problem is
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / March 14, 2009 12:16 AM PDT

For those it doesn't work, what do they do? Vista 64 is not on the list so if it fails, no one will help you.
Bob

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Tubo Tax issues on vista?
by pzepeda74 / March 20, 2009 11:53 AM PDT
In reply to: What does not work...

I had not a single problem. Bought the business edition/deluxe. Loaded fine did my taxes, got my refund in 8 days. Have Vista 64, i7-965,6Gb ddr3, x58. In fact have had done 5 separate, different free e-files since Jan. Guess I got lucky!!!!

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Even Vista 32-bit versions are still no true 32-bit
by MadDog843 / March 22, 2009 6:55 AM PDT
In reply to: What does not work...

you should have no issue, as even most Vista 32-bit systems, are just set back 64-bit systems. Even the 32-bit systems are usually running 64-bit processors, and if it wasn't for the box manufacturers such as Dell and HP, there wouldn't even be a single 32-bit Vista OS alive. The original OS was built to be 64-bit, that is one reason Vista has been so troublesome, because it was not originally built to be a 32-bit base system. If it is Vista Compatible at all, it should run backwards compatible with 64-bit OS's as well

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Not entirely accurate...
by John.Wilkinson / March 22, 2009 7:56 AM PDT

"Even Vista 32-bit versions are still no true 32-bit"
-> Actually, they are.


"if it wasn't for the box manufacturers such as Dell and HP, there wouldn't even be a single 32-bit Vista OS alive"
-> The 32-bit editions of Windows Vista are still more popular with system builders and upgraders than their 64-bit counterparts, so Windows Vista x86 is not solely dependent on HP, Dell, etc.


"The original OS was built to be 64-bit, that is one reason Vista has been so troublesome, because it was not originally built to be a 32-bit base system."
-> Not true. Windows Vista was based on the code for Windows Server 2003, which comes in both 32-bit and 64-bit flavors. The 64-bit edition was not created until two years after the 32-bit edition and Windows Vista was always intended to come in both. If you follow the lineage, you could better argue Windows Vista x64 stems from x86 code since Windows Server 2003 x64 was based on Windows Server 2003 x86.


"If it is Vista Compatible at all, it should run backwards compatible with 64-bit OS's as well"
-> Not all 32-bit Windows Vista-compatible applications can be run under Windows Vista x64, largely due to differences in the available APIs.


John

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So true.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / March 22, 2009 10:46 PM PDT

Do you live near Redmond, WA?

While I made this discussion, it was for the warning about issues people are running into with Tax software and Vista 64. It's appropriate for this time of year and my hope was to save a few people the trouble.

Yes, it might work (and in fact does for some). But here is the rub. For some it doesn't and when they call it it, they get the "not supported" reply and this is why I'm going with "get a version that lists Vista 64" if that applies to you.
Bob

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