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Streaming Netflix to my Blu Ray DVD Player

by Kenneth Suna / December 13, 2009 6:32 AM PST

I don't have wifi in my apartment, I have a DSL modem plugged up to my computer which is in my bedroom.

My TV is in my living room. If I wanted to be able to stream movies from Netflix to my TV, what products would I need? I'd hate to have an ethernet cable running from my bedroom all the way to my living room.

Could I have a wireless router in my living room? How would the router pick up the connection to my DSL modem in my bedroom? Or could I plug the ethernet cable (or router) into my phone line in my living room?

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How too
by givemeaname / December 13, 2009 9:11 AM PST

Modem too router (most people put the router right next or very near too the modem)... then there are 3 ways from there...

Hardwire

Get a BD player that can do wireless

Get a wireless bridge or a power-line bridge to hook up to the BD player, just makesure it is compatable with the router.

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more questions
by Kenneth Suna / December 13, 2009 9:51 AM PST
In reply to: How too

"Modem too router (most people put the router right next or very near too the modem)... then there are 3 ways from there...

Get a wireless bridge or a power-line bridge to hook up to the BD player, just makesure it is compatable with the router."

Okay so this is pretty complex for me. My computer is in my bedroom. I'd have to get a router (not wireless?) and plug it into my DSL modem. Then, in my living room, I'd plug the power-line bridge into the outlet next to my TV and connect the ethernet cord to my TV and ... what then? Am I all set?

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No matter where it goes you need a router
by minimalist / December 13, 2009 10:00 AM PST
In reply to: more questions

Almost all routers handle both wireless and wired connections. The router goes in between the cable modem and the rest of your devices. You can do one of two things:

1. Put the router in the bedroom where the modem is now, hardwire the computer and find a device for streaming that has built in wifi (or buy a wireless bridge for devices that only have ethernet)

2. Put the router and the cable modem in the living room and hardwire the Netflix streaming device and get a wireless bridge for the computer in the bedroom.

I find Netflix streams better (especially HD streams) when its hardwired so I would go for option 2 if possible.

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follow up
by Kenneth Suna / December 13, 2009 10:19 AM PST

Almost all routers handle both wireless and wired connections. The router goes in between the cable modem and the rest of your devices. You can do one of two things:

1. Put the router in the bedroom where the modem is now, hardwire the computer and find a device for streaming that has built in wifi (or buy a wireless bridge for devices that only have ethernet)

2. Put the router and the cable modem in the living room and hardwire the Netflix streaming device and get a wireless bridge for the computer in the bedroom.

I find Netflix streams better (especially HD streams) when its hardwired so I would go for option 2 if possible.

Okay, so I'd have to buy:

1. ethernet cable
2. router
3. wireless bridge, so my modem wouldn't be plugged into my computer anymore? would it still work just as fast in my bedroom as it does now?

and -- could you recommend a router and bridge? i have a macbook if that matters. thanks so much for your help!

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???
by givemeaname / December 13, 2009 11:06 AM PST
In reply to: follow up

So you have a notebook and never done wifi with it?

What model is it, it may have built it wifi.

For routers there is
'Linksys' (what I have)
or
'D-link'

look for a multiband N Band router, cost bit more then G-band ($40) one's but N-band ($100) is the future. And if I remember right you live in an apartment, right(?), so you do not need one like mine that has dual 12" extended anntenas for 300ft+ coverage. So you can get one of the small sleek lookings ones out there now days.

Yes you will need some Cat5 cables... One about 1ft to connect the modem to router then one XXft from the router to Bluray player, that one get more feet then you think to hide the cable.

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wifi
by Kenneth Suna / December 13, 2009 11:16 AM PST
In reply to: ???

So you have a notebook and never done wifi with it?

What model is it, it may have built it wifi.

For routers there is
'Linksys' (what I have)
or
'D-link'

look for a multiband N Band router, cost bit more then G-band ($40) one's but N-band ($100) is the future. And if I remember right you live in an apartment, right(?), so you do not need one like mine that has dual 12" extended anntenas for 300ft+ coverage. So you can get one of the small sleek lookings ones out there now days.

Yes you will need some Cat5 cables... One about 1ft to connect the modem to router then one XXft from the router to Bluray player, that one get more feet then you think to hide the cable.

I have a brand new MacBook -- got it two weeks ago. not sure how to check if it has wifi built in. if it does, how does that change things?

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ok
by Kenneth Suna / December 13, 2009 11:41 AM PST
In reply to: ???

okay, i think i've figured it out ...

my computer is wifi ready, but I need to buy a wifi base station, correct?

so, for my needs, it'd make sense if I got the Air Port Express. It's $99.

I'd plug the base station into the outlet, and then plug my ethernet into that and boom, I'd get online wirelessly.

Then, in my living room, I'd get the N-Band router, plug an ethernet cable into that and then plug the ethernet cable into my TV (since you say streaming netflix works better hardwired).

That should be it, right?

So, I'd have to buy:

1. Airport Express
2. Ethernet Cable for TV
3. N-Band Router

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That sounds likea docking station
by givemeaname / December 13, 2009 12:31 PM PST
In reply to: ok

No you should not need that.

Wifi = No wires

I am pc person & my limited knewledge of mac stuff is just my Ipod touch, but this should help you some.

http://forums.linksysbycisco.com/linksys/board/message?board.id=Wireless_Routers&message.id=80236


You can do some of this with out a router, you will just will see someone else's router but you will then now it is working.
First thing get a N-band multi band router (linksy or D-link) and then 2 cat5 (ethernet cables) one for modem to router then one long one for router to tv/bluray player.

And what Bluray player do you have??

Your also going to have to figer out if your going to run open wifi or run some security on the router. I just run open wifi because of 4 things. I have 5 wired/wireless things running, I have dynamic IP address that changes every 4-6 hours, where I live (distance of houses) & I know there is no real such thing as safe secure wifi (wired is the safe way).
I just turn off the router and modem via a surge protector when not in use & I do not put anything inportant like passwords & CC numbers on my computers, also only use webhost email accounts, no 'outlook' for me. + I have internet security software running and browser security settings set high.

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Mac's and WiFi and Airport Express, oh my
by Dan Filice / December 13, 2009 2:58 PM PST
In reply to: ok

I have a Mac and I use an Airport Express, but I don't use it for Internet access. I tried, but my phone company is not compatible with the Apple modem products so I use a 2Wire combo modem / router. I use my Airport Express strictly for playing iTunes wirelessly. Unless you want to transmit iTunes wirelessly, don't get one. If you do get one for Internet access, check with your phone company to see if their system is compatible. I almost went nuts trying to configure my Airport Express for wireless Internet until I found out it wasn't compatible. Our Mac laptop, our two PC's, our iPod Touch, Blackberry and multiple cell phones all use the wireless function of the 2Wire to get Internet access. In addition, we have a PS3 that also uses the wireless function of the 2Wire network to play online games, download games and movies and we can browse the Internet with the PS3 too. The PS3 is in a different room from the 2Wire. There are multiple DVD players now that can get wireless access the same as the PS3. I think both of my Panasonic BD players need a hard-wired CAT5 connection to go online for downloads.

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Your Macbook has wifi built in.
by minimalist / December 13, 2009 2:31 PM PST
In reply to: follow up

So you don't need a wire or a bridge for it.

Just get an Apple airport extreme and put it and the living room along with the cable modem. Plug whatever device you are using for Netflix streaming directly into the router and connect that to your TV.

You haven't said what you plan to use to stream Netflix? Roku Box? XBox 360? Blu-ray Player with built in streaming?

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Airport expresses will work only if the device you
by minimalist / December 13, 2009 2:35 PM PST

are using to steam netflix has wireless (the airport express only has one ethernet jack which the cable modem occupies... the airport extreme has 4.

There are cheaper routers out there but the software for the Apple routers is some of the easiest to use router management software I've ever dealt with.

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blu-ray
by Kenneth Suna / December 13, 2009 10:54 PM PST

So you don't need a wire or a bridge for it.

Just get an Apple airport extreme and put it and the living room along with the cable modem. Plug whatever device you are using for Netflix streaming directly into the router and connect that to your TV.

You haven't said what you plan to use to stream Netflix? Roku Box? XBox 360? Blu-ray Player with built in streaming?

okay, so what you're saying is I don't need a router at all, all I have to do is move my DSL modem into my living room, plug the ethernet cable from the modem into the TV and then plug ANOTHER ethernet cable into the airport extreme and then I can have wireless over my entire apartment?

I use the LG BD-370.

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No. The router splits the signal to all wired and wireless
by minimalist / December 14, 2009 2:16 AM PST
In reply to: blu-ray

devices on your network. An ethernet cable comes out of the modem and goes into the Airport Extreme. Another ethernet cable come out of the Airport Extreme and goes to your LG player. Wireless will also be available all over your apartment/house now as well.

Any future web enabled game machines or devices you buy for your living room can now be plugged into the two remaining ethernet ports on the Airport Extreme.

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