Web Hosting, Design, & Coding forum

Question

Starting a webpage from scratch?

by lilviton / December 29, 2012 8:14 AM PST

I am a teenager and I am looking to blog, but in a serious, more professional way than tumblr. I can't seem to understand how to set up a blog through hosts and wordpress. So this is what I am thinking. I need a web host to have a domain of my choice. I want to be able to put up articles in different categories, and have users from some network (whether a network specific to mysite or a network via the web host or ??? I really don't know how to integrate some sort of login for users) and I want this so can be interactive with comments and submissions. So a website with a couple tabs to categorize articles with some means of users for commenting can't take much to set up. Well, it can but I will do it nonetheless so what do i do?

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All Answers

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Answer
Step by step
by Sovereign Forum moderator / December 30, 2012 11:15 PM PST
1. Purchase a domain name

You can do this from your host, as they often provide you with one for free if you're hosting with them, but I recommend purchasing it from someone other than your host, so you have the flexibility of easily changing hosts down the road (without having to deal with transferring your domain).

2. Purchase web hosting

A shared hosting account is great for starters, because they are inexpensive and very easy to maintain. You'll want to find a host that allows you to install content management systems like WordPress.

3. Install a content management system

There are a lot of options, but from what you've told us, WordPress seems like something you should consider. It provides everything you're looking for out of the box, but it has lots of customization options that let you take your website wherever you want to go in the future.

From 0 to 100%, I reckon that all of this shouldn't take you more than a few hours to setup. Once that's all done, you can start tinkering within the WordPress administration screen to figure out how to categorize things, allow users to register, comment on articles, etc. WordPress is pretty intuitive, so you may get everything setup in a day.

~Sovereign
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Answer
CMS
by alphaomegalady / January 2, 2013 2:36 PM PST

I suggest you to choose WordPress as the cms, it's easy to use and have lot choices of template. Good luck with your new blog.

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