Photo Editing & Graphic Design forum

Question

Software purchase suggestions

by gelato-gal / February 10, 2012 3:52 AM PST

Hello -
I have a project that I would like to take in-house and need suggestions for a software program that is not overly complex and expensive.

I am looking to design labels for an product that will go onto an ice cream pint size container (think a modified cylinder - smaller at the bottom and larger at the top). I need to be able to create designs that the print does not get distorted. The software will need to be able to work with photos, text and graphics. I need a software that will output a format that I can print or be able to send to a printer.

Thanks for any suggestions!

Discussion is locked
You are posting a reply to: Software purchase suggestions
The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Please refer to our CNET Forums policies for details. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Track this discussion and email me when there are updates

If you're asking for technical help, please be sure to include all your system info, including operating system, model number, and any other specifics related to the problem. Also please exercise your best judgment when posting in the forums--revealing personal information such as your e-mail address, telephone number, and address is not recommended.

You are reporting the following post: Software purchase suggestions
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.
Collapse -
Clarification Request
Sorry but doesn't GIMP, MS Paint and more do that?
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / February 10, 2012 4:00 AM PST

There's also too many apps like Serif (there are free versions.)

There is ALWAYS DISTORTION. I wonder if we need to go into discussions about onscreen WYSIWYG is not exact or that most folk never do color calibration?
Bob

Collapse -
MS Paint and others...
by gelato-gal / February 11, 2012 7:06 AM PST

Aren't this used for low resolution photo or graphic manipulation? I need to have a mix of text, graphic and photos items to put on a lable that will wrap around an irregular package and have everything line up with the base of the package. It's a pint size container of ice cream. I've heard illistrator will do that but the cost is waaaay to much...

I'm following up with the inDesign suggestion. I've never heard of Scribus, but I'll check it out as well.

Thanks Wink

Collapse -
Aren't this used for low resolution photo or graphic manipul
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / February 13, 2012 7:33 AM PST
In reply to: MS Paint and others...

Aren't this used for low resolution photo or graphic manipulation?

No. Since the canvas can be as big as need be, my answer is no.

Not only that but we can tinker with DPI later if need be. IRFANVIEW makes quick work on that.

You have a good question but no offense intended, you seem to have not heard of the good free tools out there like The Gimp, Paint.Net and more.

Here's a list -> http://mashable.com/2007/10/27/graphics-toolbox/
Bob

All Answers

Collapse -
Answer
Adobe InDesign CS5
by KenHusveg / February 10, 2012 4:12 AM PST

If your dealing with print shops Adobe InDesign is a good start. Scribus is worth a look as well, but Adobe has the best output tools for professional printing.

Popular Forums
icon
Computer Help 49,613 discussions
icon
Computer Newbies 10,349 discussions
icon
Laptops 19,436 discussions
icon
Security 30,426 discussions
icon
TVs & Home Theaters 20,308 discussions
icon
Windows 10 360 discussions
icon
Phones 15,802 discussions
icon
Windows 7 7,351 discussions
icon
Networking & Wireless 14,641 discussions

Tech explained

Do you know what an OLED TV is?

CNET explains how OLED technology differs from regular TVs, and what you need to know to make the right shopping decision.