Speakeasy forum

General discussion

School funding

by Willy / February 21, 2013 12:01 AM PST

If i understand it right, depending on the head count of public school students present, funding is provided for that number. Excluding any other guidelines or requirements, etc., basically a reference to the number of students recorded in a district, etc..

So, if you remove them to private schooling or voucher elsewhere, that count of students is reduced if they attended public system. So how is it that this really works for the public school system as offered by or any other Governor? :


The populace is still taxed to support the school district they're in BUT the other costs, etc. that any school district faces are lost. Take for example energy cost, it still costs just as much to heat a building for 400 vs 450 students. Those 50 students could very well be a tipping point to include aspects of any associated costs. Building don't get smaller and as found here locally, once a school district shrinks, it tends to reduce open schools building or eliminate them. Then, they see the cost saving if they build new and become more centralized. BUT, in the meantime real saving aren't being made as bonds, etc. are pushed for this or that to include any new taxes, etc..

So, having that in mind, if I save on a personal income tax, but turn around and pay higher school taxes, did I really escape any reduced taxes or public funding burdens. This is not give and take, its bait and switch, IMHO.

Here, roughly 75% of my real estate taxes goes to the school district, yet 1-2% pays for the whole park system.
yet another 2-3% takes for special needs for seniors, etc.. I realize the school system is more expensive but it never gets reduced and any costs related to bonds or special tax votes remain on the books for yrs., as you may know it takes a long time to repay building new schools, like 30-40yrs.. But NOOOOO! it offered by like it increases only $20-40 per household per $100K of value per yr.. yeah, but what about next yrs. issues or problems. geeessss

I may not be a "tea party member" but I'm sure looking at less coffee nowadays. wink-wink,notch-notch Shocked -----Willy aka -taxpayer

Post a reply
Discussion is locked
You are posting a reply to: School funding
The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Please refer to our CNET Forums policies for details. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Track this discussion and email me when there are updates

If you're asking for technical help, please be sure to include all your system info, including operating system, model number, and any other specifics related to the problem. Also please exercise your best judgment when posting in the forums--revealing personal information such as your e-mail address, telephone number, and address is not recommended.

You are reporting the following post: School funding
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.
Collapse -
Schools can close off rooms
by James Denison / February 21, 2013 3:25 AM PST
In reply to: School funding

they aren't using, much like a homeowner may do in the winter or summer at extreme temps. Our guest bedroom stays mostly cold during the winter months, we cut off all heat to it if nobody is in it.

Collapse -
Housing in my area is up 3X since we moved here
by Steven Haninger / February 21, 2013 4:03 AM PST
In reply to: School funding

but my property taxes have gone up 6X. Something has to give. It's largely for schools but huge increases have also come for children's and mental health services as well as for programs for the developmentally disabled. Some programs were once bundled but now individually split and seek their own regular levies. I'm sure all of these are important but it seems these services always need more than they have and always tell us that problems are getting worse and not better. I've no solution for you but maybe misery does love company.

Collapse -
Housing 3X
by Willy / February 21, 2013 6:47 AM PST

Does that mean that many more houses are being build. I just didn't grasp that part. I sure as heck understand taxes going 6X. As for local housing, some of the newer homes aren't farm houses but country retreats of sorts. I know these will drive my taxes up as they count int he overall value, but these are 2 acres or less. I almost hate seeing anything new going up as it effects the value and generally not farm at all, strictly rural homes of I guess that call them bedroom community, though still small. Misery loves company, but we're running of places to sit. Sad -----Willy

Collapse -
No available land to build on where I live
by Steven Haninger / February 21, 2013 7:36 AM PST
In reply to: Housing 3X

I'm within city limits in a sub-division near the big university here. There's no place to grow. All I know is that if I multiply what I paid by 3, that's the approximate price homes are selling for in the sub division. If I divide this past year's tax bill by 6, it's very close to the first tax bill I paid 35 years ago. We weren't as greatly affected by the skyrocketing housing costs and didn't feel the bomb blast when the thing came to earth. In that regard, I guess I should be thankful. But since you mentioned schools, that hit a bit of a sore point with me. You may have heard of the data "scrubbing" going on these past years in Ohio. I live very near the main data system where the cooking of the books happened. It's located in a school that closed many years ago as demographics changed here. Basically, attendance numbers, grades and such were creatively manipulated to produce higher performance numbers than were actually achieved. Schools get funding partially based on attendance so some were getting money for more students than were actually there. As you probably know, the city school systems have huge problems of other kinds that are affecting the education of its students. This probably means that higher achievement scores are phony as well. Good PR is important when schools ask for more money from homeowners and they need to show what a great job they are doing. The discovery of these phony testing scores and non-existent students has created quite a problem with voters who were about to be asked for a substantial increase in school funding via another levy. The levy is on hold for now so I don't need to feel guilty for already wanting to vote "NO".

Collapse -
same thing here
by James Denison / February 21, 2013 7:53 AM PST

garbage especially went up since we have to support recycling, which contrary to what they'd have you believe doesn't pay for itself. I do save from paying front foot cost of waterline since it's finally paid off after 30 years, so may have a 20 year skate on that till they come through and do new lines again.

Collapse -
by Willy / February 22, 2013 5:32 AM PST

Well that "scrubbing" has hit here too or rather the big city. The local schools aren't that involved and pretty much rural and isn't effected. It's not like there's a bunch of schools to switch around, it's your basic school system. 1-HS, 1-MS and elementary(if not combined). As for scrubbing, again it's all about the $ since the funding is needed one way or another and they don't want to lose any. Of course, the Ohio level side of it wants it going where it suppose to and reduce any conflicts or more required funding or something like that. it seems all those regs and requirements are more paper pushing until someone really looks at it. The school anywhere is cash cow depending who gets what. It generates alot of levies and/or tax increases and never goes away. Sometimes, I wish the old 1 room school house were still here. -----Willy Happy

Popular Forums
Computer Help 49,613 discussions
Computer Newbies 10,349 discussions
Laptops 19,436 discussions
Security 30,426 discussions
TVs & Home Theaters 20,308 discussions
Windows 10 360 discussions
Phones 15,802 discussions
Windows 7 7,351 discussions
Networking & Wireless 14,641 discussions

CNET Holiday Gift Guide

Looking for great gifts under $100?

Trendy tech gifts don't require a hefty price tag. Choose from these CNET-recommended useful and high-quality gadgets.