Samsung forum

General discussion

Samsung Blu-Ray Wireless

by tooeagle / May 4, 2009 7:55 AM PDT

Samsung came out recently with the bdp 3600 Blu-ray player and in the features and specifications it says it is "wireless ready". It also says it includes a samsung USB wi-fi Dongle that costs somewhere around $80.00.

Don't mean to sound dumb, but here goes:

Does anyone know what "wireless ready" means as it relates to these players? Won't any DVD player that has a USB connection, be able to connect to the internet wirelessly if you stick a wi-fi dongle into it? I have one that I paid about $15.00 for 6 months ago at Frys. Is this all one needs to make the player "wireless wifi"

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Samsung Blu-Ray Wireless
by Samsung_HD_Tech Samsung staff / May 4, 2009 9:33 AM PDT

tooeagle,

There is actually a good question.

The BD-P1600 does not come with a dongle, and it must be purchased seperately. The BD-P3600 does come with the dongle. The "Wireless Ready" part denotes that an existing wireless internet router is necessary for that feature to work.

Hope that clears up some of the confusion.

--HDTech

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samsung bdp 1600 vs 3600
by tooeagle / May 4, 2009 11:46 AM PDT

Is there something special about that dongle that sumsung wants 80.00 for it? Is it the same thing I would get at a dept dtore for 25-30 bucks? And if so, would the 1600 do the same thing for me as the 3600 if I bought the dongle separately?

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samsung bdp 1600 vs 3600
by Samsung_HD_Tech Samsung staff / May 4, 2009 1:33 PM PDT

tooeagle,

My apologies, I didn't address all of your questions. Whoops!

Yes, the dongle itself is designed to work exclusively with the 09 products. It's different in that everything necessary to make it run with the television is built in. Most generic or name brand drivers require drivers to properly connect. Since we can't load drivers (the traditional way) into the television, the LinkSticks are designed to work out of the box with no software. It also allows us to know that the part you're using is something we can troubleshoot in the event you call 800-SAMSUNG for assistance in your setup.

The BD-P3600 will also hame some additional internal memory, as well as the included Linkstick.

Let me know if you have any other questions or would like to dicuss anything else!

--HDTech

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1600 vs 3600
by tooeagle / May 4, 2009 2:49 PM PDT

Thank you. Perhaps one more, then I think I'll go out and buy this thing. Apparently the 1600 is "wireless ready", according to someone I just talked to at Best Buy. From what you say, it appears that even though the 1600 is also wireless ready (except for the dongle), I would still have to purchase the samsung 80.00 dongle and not the one I already have. Right?

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1600 vs 3600
by Samsung_HD_Tech Samsung staff / May 5, 2009 4:58 AM PDT
In reply to: 1600 vs 3600

tooeagle,

Yes, that is correct. The BD-P1600 requires the additional purchase of the dongle for the wireless connectivity. I'm not sure if the dongles are available at all retailers, so you might want to factor that into your purchase decision, as prices may vary. The retailers set the prices, so I can't say what the price will be.

And yes, the dongle you have will not work, and I don't know of any brands that would be cheaper that would.

--HDTech

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dvd
by jomoannie / August 13, 2009 12:18 PM PDT
In reply to: 1600 vs 3600

why would anyone want a 1600 rather than a 3600

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1600 VS 3600
by jacobimh / January 2, 2010 11:28 AM PST
In reply to: dvd

If your wireless route is right next to your Blu Ray player, then the 1600 is less expensive and the direct connection is more secure and faster. If you don't need wireless, it may be the way to go.

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Oh Brother...RIP-OFF Alert
by primerisk / July 15, 2011 1:59 AM PDT

Ok, Samsung has decided to go proprietary for financial reasons. They have selected a $5 wireless dongle that their products are locked to and won't work with anything else so they can sell it to you for $80 (a $75 profit). Don't get me wrong, they deserve to make a profit, but maybe they shouldn't try to make so much. Do yourself a HUGE favor and purchase a Wireless Gaming Adapter (WGA). You can get them online or in any local store that sells game systems (xbox/PS3/nintendo) for about 1/2 what Samsung is asking for the proprietary adapter. The upside is you can still use the WGA next year when you upgrade your TV or Blu-Ray, I'll bet you a nickle that next year's version of Samsung products won't be able to use the same adapter due to "technical differences" in the products. And, if you have multiple devices that need a network connection (let's say you have a TV, Blu-Ray, and xBox), you can buy a $10 switch and hook them all up to the same WGA.

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Hi Brother. Ever price this out?
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / July 15, 2011 2:02 AM PDT

Car mat prices when you buy a car?

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Car may prices?
by primerisk / July 15, 2011 12:53 PM PDT

Yes, very similar. Car dealerships like to soak you if you want their version of the floor mats. Luckily, when I buy car mats from AutoZone my car won't detect that they aren't from Toyota and refuse to let me use them.

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Then we are in sync.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / July 15, 2011 1:13 PM PDT
In reply to: Car may prices?

The car mat thing is one example. There are many others.

Now that you know all about this, where's the beef?
Bob

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Where's the beef? Wendy's
by primerisk / July 16, 2011 12:57 AM PDT
In reply to: Then we are in sync.

Consumer Electronics manufacturers, including Samsung, have been operating in an anti-competitive manner for a long time. Until very recently cellular phone companies took great pride in making sure accessories were not compatible across manufacturers and even not among lines of their own phones. This was done to increase profit margins and sales volumes.

My "beef", as you put it, is this is just another example of this behavior. On top of being overpriced, it's wasteful. At the end of the useful lifetime of the Samsung Blu-Ray or TV, a generic wireless dongle could be used again on a laptop, computer, or possibly on the replacement TV or Blu-Ray. The Samsung dongle will have to be thrown away by all but the tech savvy that know enough on how to work around the ID code of the dongle.

Conversely, TiVo encourages the re-use of all components that they associate with their products. The first peanut remote from the very first line of DVRs they produced will still work with their newest model and even on different platforms and from different manufacturers licensing the TiVo software. Yes, even the Samsung brand TiVo. TiVo also sells their own wired and wireless ethernet adapters at the same time they provide a full list of compatible adapters from other manufacturers AND they continue to update their software so new products can also be supported.

The tide on this type of Anti-Trust behavior has been changing. Auto manufacturers aren't allowed intentionally block competitors from making replacement parts and accessories. They also can't arbitrarily void your warranty if you do (which they tried). Microsoft got into big trouble with the FTC, US DoJ, and the EU for writing their OS so you couldn't remove their accessories and replace it with competing products.

I think that Samsung should re-think their position on this type of behavior as the US and EU governments are beginning to pay attention. Consumers, like myself, are paying attention too. I certainly take this into consideration when I am shopping and will vote with my wallet.

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I see you would take on the auto dealers too?
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / July 16, 2011 2:08 AM PDT

Frankly, your thoughts apply to almost all retail venues.

Why not shop defensely?

And where's the beef? As in what law do you think is being violated? And if so, why didn't you take it up with your local AG?

All very interesting stuff but nothing really seems to be amiss here. You may be upset about something else but I can't tell.
Bob

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I'm not sure how I could be much clearer...
by primerisk / July 16, 2011 3:23 AM PDT

I don't have any issue with the auto dealers or manufacturers, they don't force me to use only their accessories. You keep citing "many other examples" and "almost all retail venues", but you don't provide any examples, references, or facts. More over, I'm not discussing the retailers, but rather the manufacturers.

I do shop defensively. I also encourage others to do the same by providing examples, references, and facts so they can draw their own conclusions.

The laws I cite are United States Anti-Trust laws (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_antitrust_law), specifically those about monopolistic behavior that hurt businesses and consumers. I don't like the fact that legislation has to be put in place. I'd rather have the consumers be aware and make their own decisions whether or not to do business with companies that act in this manner. Since I am aware of these practices, I am careful not to put myself in these situations so I don't need to seek legal relief.

Bob, you predicate your points on generalities and assumptions. I don't agree with your implication that I am upset or that I have a "beef". I have simply provided my opinion with supporting facts and references about my belief that Samsung is operating in an anti-competitive manner with no other motivation than profit. Please feel free to provide your own facts and examples if you would like to debate mine. Or you can simply chose to disagree.

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Oh Brother...RIP-OFF Alert
by Samsung_HD_Tech Samsung staff / July 15, 2011 5:16 AM PDT

primerisk,

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I stand corrected...
by primerisk / July 15, 2011 12:44 PM PDT

I apparently own you a nickle that the wireless dongle hasn't been outdated after 2 years. I would accept the arguments about support and customers wanting an easy experience if they didn't intentionally block competing products. Samsung could easily say we'll happily support you if you use our adapter, but if you use another device we won't.

The reality is that Samsung is just using the very common and inexpensive Ralink RT2870 chipset that is utilized by no less than 50 manufacturers and about 150 variants to create very low cost (under $10 in cases) wireless adapters. Feel free to visit http://wikidrivers.com/wiki/Ralink_RT2870 for information and a driver that works with all 150 manufacturer's versions of the wireless adapter. The single functional difference between these 150 adapters? An identification string with the Vendor and Device ID which in turn your Samsung will just refuse to work with because Samsung programmed it not to.

It sounds a little like anti-competition to me.

There are a few dongles from other manufacturers that are using a Generic Vendor/Device ID for the Ralink chipset. This will bypass the Samsung software blocking. Take a look for the Rosewill RNX-N1, it sports the same guts as the LinkStick and runs 1/4 the cost. Others have had success with the Intellinet 52397.

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I stand corrected...
by Samsung_HD_Tech Samsung staff / July 18, 2011 5:02 AM PDT
In reply to: I stand corrected...

primerisk,

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Vista Bridge
by sparkthug / July 9, 2010 1:03 PM PDT

If you have a wireless USB adapter laying around, I say give it a try. I don't think it would hurt. I was just about to "go there" when I figured, I would create a network Bridge using my VISTA laptop. Sure, its not a very permanent solution, but its pretty easy to just walk the laptop over to my Blu Ray, and plug in one network cable from the laptop to the Samsung Blu Ray (1600 in my case).

There are several places on the internet where you can learn the few steps it takes to have your wireless home network flow through your lab top, from your wireless internet then out the back to the laptop's network port. It takes about 1 minute to create this "network bridge" and you can keep it up, without harm to your laptop, even when the wire side is not being used.

If you don't have a wireless laptop, of course, this solution will not work for you.

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Wireless USB
by DKendrick3 / August 13, 2010 3:30 AM PDT
In reply to: Vista Bridge

I tried plugging a Linksys Wireless USB adapter into my new BDC5500 player. It would not recognize. It would appear that Samsung makes you buy their adapter for this to work.

I hadn't thought of daisy-chaining, per se, my player to my wireless laptop with a patch cable. That's an interesting angle. Since I don't really need to have this player constantly connected to the Net, this may be an option. I'm going to give that a try. Thanks for the tip.

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