Camcorders forum

Question

Recording loud volume

by Stockdog2112 / July 14, 2013 9:16 AM PDT

Trying to record my band rehearsals and get distortion from the bass guitar in the video. I have a Canon FS20 and have a Rode Mic hooked up to it. The rode is set to -10db and the High Pass Filter on and get popping sound in video. I have tried all settings and can't get rid of it. If I could turn down audio level in camera that would solve problem. Nothing from canon as far as software to do this. Do I need a differant camera? if so what is a good one to use for loud recording for the $250.00 range, thanks for any help.

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All Answers

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Answer
You need something
by boya84 / July 14, 2013 12:58 PM PDT
In reply to: Recording loud volume

with some sort of manual audio control. The too-loud audio is overwhelming the camcorder's automatic audio gain control. Lowering by 10db won't help much. The high cut filter is pretty useless for this, too.

Reading through the manual for the Canon FS20
http://gdlp01.c-wss.com/gds/7/0300001917/01/fs20-21-22-200-nim-en.pdf
we find this camcorder has no manual audio gain control. You can turn the camcorder's audio meter on - I suspect it is constantly pegged and the resulting audio sounds very muddy and there is lots of static.

You have a choice:

1) Replace the camcorder with one that has manual audio gain control. Before we go here, lets check the other options...

2) Use some sort of external audio gain control device... There are a couple of ways, but since you are in a band you know about good mics (XLR connectors). Using a XLR adapter like those from juicedLink or BeachTek along with an XLR-connecting mic will work. Use the XLR adapter's audio gain control knobs to work as designed.

3) Record the audio separately using a digital audio recorder (I like the Zoom H2, H2n and H4n... I have no experience with the H1, but it should be just fine - there are lots of other manufacturers like Edirol, Marantz, Tascom, Roland). When the video with the poor audio is imported to a computer for editing, import the audio, synch, then mute the audio from the camcorder... Hollywood's been making full length feature movies like this for *many years (file cameras do not generally have an audio recording subsystem). You can also use a computer to do this... If you don't have a robust audio recording application, Audacity works great.

Back to the replacement... The FS20 records standard def video. If you can afford to get a new camcorder, be sure some sort of manual audio control is in the feature list. The low end of consumer camcorders sometimes has a very rudimentary control with basic off (normal audio levels) or on (loud audio levels). Canon calls it "attenuator" and Sony calls it MicRefLvl. You'll find this in the camcorder's manual. In the mid and above ranges, the manual audio control is usually engaged using the camcorder's menu and a 10-12 step level range can be selected for more granular control.

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Thank You!
by Stockdog2112 / July 14, 2013 10:59 PM PDT
In reply to: You need something

That is exactly what I was looking for to solve my problem. I will get the Beachtec DXA-2T and I will be able to use the Rode Videomic Pro that I already have. This will take care of my issue by simply giving me the ability to adjust the Audio input! Thanks again for your help. Rock On!! Cool

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You should be OK...
by boya84 / July 15, 2013 3:46 AM PDT
In reply to: Thank You!

The DXA-2T has an aux input (1/8" - 3.5mm) between the gain control knobs (in addition to the two XLR connectors). This Aux input is mono audio (right channel) only.
Link to the manual:
http://www.beachtek.com/publisher/wp-content/files_mf/1333636467DXA2TEnglishManualV02.pdf
Picture on page 7; item 5 is described on page 6. The gain for the Aux is controlled by the Right channel gain control knob... Remember the M/S switch - you are going to use it.

The RODE VideoMic Pro is a directional mono-mic and uses a 1/8" - 3.5mm connector - not stereo, but does have a 3-condutor connector to record to the left and right channels. Be sure to *test* how this all works and flip the M/S (mono/stereo) switch on the DXA-2T to ensure the audio is recording into the camcorder as you require (you probably want it in Mono for the camcorder to record the same audio to the left and right channels). Be sure the battery in the mic is good. Since the mic needs power, can't use phantom power and the DXA-2T cannot provide phantom power, the internal mic battery needs to be working.

In the future, if mics using phantom power are used (and they cannot carry a battery for power), the DXA-2T won't work - The DXA-HDV can supply phantom power to these sorts of mics (I know - the DXA-HDV is another $100, but this is just a heads up). I use a DXA-6 (has not been made for a while). Both BeachTek and juicedLink (I use a CX231 - again, not made for a while) work fine.

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