TVs & Home Theaters forum


Recorded DVD-R won't play on a 2nd player. Please help.

by KENTGA / October 5, 2011 3:51 AM PDT

I have a Toshiba D-R410 DVD recorder (home audio type) and when I record onto a Memorex DVD-R, the DVD will play on the Toshiba, but it won't play on a Sony or Denon player or on either of my computer DVD drives.

Here are the setings on the Toshiba:
Video- Progressive- Off
Audio Recording- DD
Auto Finalize- when disk is full (or when I "Stop" and do it manually
Make Recording Compatible- On

If it makes any difference, I record programs from my Direct TV player/recorder using composite A/V and the programs are usually one hour long.

Thanks for any suggestions.


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All Answers

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This is a common ocurrence
by Pepe7 / October 5, 2011 6:28 AM PDT

First, the whole recordable DVD format is a crapshoot from the get-go ;(. It's normally better to record on a PC with software/drive/blank media of your choice, *then* find some compatible DVD recorders/players to view the content. It appears as though in your case the Toshiba is producing something that simply can't be played back elsewhere.

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by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / October 5, 2011 6:44 AM PDT

You will find this to be true. I will be honest with you that not all players will play our home made DVDs.

But here's a FEW tips.

1. Try making it with DVD FLICK
2. USE the media the player says it supports. I see folk stuffing in DVDRW media and they won't listen to "check the list"

3. Record at ONE HALF SPEED. Use the lower of media speed or drive speed.
4. Still failing? Use the other media, swap plus for minus and vice versa.

And no, it does not always work.

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Recorded DVD-R won't play on a 2nd player. Please help
by 3coursedinner / October 5, 2011 11:26 PM PDT

You may want to try a different brand of blank DVD. I learned a long time ago that Memorex may be cheap but it's worth it to get Verbatim when on sale.
You didn't say whether it was a single or dual layer blank. I've found that DL Memorex blanks are problematic.

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Thanks for the replies
by KENTGA / October 6, 2011 12:56 AM PDT

I tried a Memorex DVD+R and got the same result--- won't play in 2nd player. The disk is a single layer. I'll get a different brand DVD disk. Unfortunately, what I'm trying to record and playback is a Direct TV receiver and it's not close to a computer and it plays and records at standard playback speed. The Toshiba is a couple of years old and I've just started using it.

Can somebody suggest a brand and model number DVD recorder that they've had success with?

Thanks, Kent

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Too many variables involved to be particularly helpful
by Pepe7 / October 6, 2011 2:09 AM PDT
In reply to: Thanks for the replies

There are several variables involved unfortunately ;(. First, the brand/model of the standalone. Next, the type of DVD media you are using. Third, the secondary playback devices. Finally, the DVD drive/software used on the computer. Sounds a bit mucky, eh? You really have to test it out personally since any content we have recorded/burned successfully on our DVD recorders *still* might not necessarily play back successfully for you on your PC, etc. It's trial and error with DVD recording IME.

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"2nd player"?
by ahtoi / October 6, 2011 12:08 PM PDT
In reply to: Thanks for the replies

Standalone player or computer dvd drive? If computer drive, can you look at its disc file? What's there? Personally I have a Toshiba DKR40 and a Magnavox, however I must confess I use dvd-rw 95% of the time because I generally edit what I record on my computer.

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DVD Recorder
by 3coursedinner / October 6, 2011 1:57 PM PDT
In reply to: Thanks for the replies

Again, may I suggest that you TRY A DIFFERENT BRAND OF BLANK DVD!
It doesn't mean anything as to what you are recording from. Memorex will work fine on the machine you record on whether a DVD recorder, computer DVD recorder, etc. Like I said, I haven't touched Memorex in years. They made a fine blank CD but not DVD's (and they don't make their own anyway).

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Not necessarily
by Pepe7 / October 7, 2011 1:00 AM PDT
In reply to: DVD Recorder

You missed part of the equation. *How* a standalone device finalizes a blank DVD can sometimes be an issue. In the sense that DVD recorders do not always do this the same way, it could potentially present compatibility issues down the line sometimes. YMMV. While changing to another brand of blank media *might* help, it's not an automatic solution as you have suggested. <pointing to the stack of properly burned/authored memorex DVD+Rs on the table>.

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Not necessarily
by 3coursedinner / October 7, 2011 11:17 PM PDT
In reply to: Not necessarily

I can't speak to Toshiba but standalone DVD recorders finalize to a standard common through the industry (identical to a commercial DVD). I never had a problem with DVD's (brands such as Sony, Verbatim and TDK) burned on my Sony DVD recorder playing on Pansonic, Oppo, Onkyo DVD players.
I'm just saying that the only brand I had a problem with is Memorex. I agree that most companies outsource blank DVD production and even with Verbatim certain plants have a better quality (such as the Verbatim blanks made in Singapore!).

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Faulty DVDs
by Dan Filice / October 8, 2011 12:59 AM PDT
In reply to: Not necessarily

I've had issues with some DVD brands, but once a DVD burns and finalizes, shouldn't this DVD, in theory, play on all DVD players? In my expreiences, faulty DVDs show their problems during the attempt to burn, not play once they have finalized. But maybe my experience isn't the norm.

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I will kindly disagree
by Pepe7 / October 8, 2011 11:42 AM PDT
In reply to: Not necessarily

You certainly haven't tried enough DVD recorders (and blank media) if that's your assessment. What's supposed to be a 'common standard' in the real world isn't always as such. 'Finalized' DVDs on standalone recorders sometimes even will not play outside of the devices they were burned with. Computer drives are most certainly superior in this regard.

In another thread you give advice to a poster saying to 'avoid memorex' but don't give any background. This doesn't make much sense.

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Kindly Disagreeing
by 3coursedinner / October 8, 2011 9:45 PM PDT
In reply to: I will kindly disagree

Well, I'm not a reviewer for a magazine or web site where I get samples to test. I'm just relating my experience -- ot was in this thread I mentioned Memorex -- specifically there was a problem burning or it only worked in the DVD recorder, not another DVD player. It may also be the DVD recorder brand -- look at your experience with Magnavox. Those are not the only blank DVD brands I've tried. Over the last 7 years using my Sony I've tried and had problems with blanks sold by HP (the worst for using on other DVD players), Maxell and store brands such as Staples and Office Max. The brands I've mentioned earlier in this thread are the ones I had most success with (although a lot of coasters burning a TDK in a computer DVD drive). You also mention a problem with a Toshiba -- this is the brand that the poster had a problem with to start this thread. Since I've only used one recorder and you have had more experience with at leasr two of them I will kindly defer to your experience.

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I agree that those brands can be dicey
by Pepe7 / October 9, 2011 1:27 PM PDT
In reply to: Kindly Disagreeing

The big cake boxes of Officemax & Staples blank DVDs are some of the worst offenders IME too. I actually cannot believe HP is still selling those horrible blanks discs either ;(. The problem is people (still) don't realize you can go online to Amazon (etc.) and find a decent brand for approximately the same price.
I don't think even Consumer Reports has the stomach (or patience) to test out every single DVD recorder, they can be so horrible ;).

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Bad burns can be different though
by Pepe7 / October 8, 2011 11:46 AM PDT

You are correct, Dan. Usually they *do* get dorked up and choke during the actual burn process. Other times, you get a finalized disc that doesn't play in some places. YMMV. It's why the whole DVD home recording medium stinks in a big way ;).

FWIW, last Xmas I almost threw my dad's Magnavox DVD recorder out into the snowbank it burned so many duds. And they were supposedly 'finalized' DVDs. This summer I encountered a Toshiba that did the same thing at a client's home. After that point they moved to a HTPC to gain more control over the burning process.

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