Tablets forum

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Poll: Do you own a tablet computer?

by Lee Koo (ADMIN) CNET staff/forum admin / March 1, 2013 6:33 AM PST
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Yes but ......
by Ted de Castro / March 1, 2013 7:48 AM PST

Yes I have a tablet and it SEEMED ok - until I started to try to add apps - I will NEVER NEVER buy and Android device again. Programmers are just as obnoxious about only writing for the very very latest version of an OS - ie. only last weeks' - as they are in Windows - BUT at least in windows you can upgrade your OS! Not so with Android - the OS version is hardware dependent and OS versions keep changing quickly - so unless you get every app you'll ever want within the first month - forget it!

It seems to me that apps can be written to be compatible with a range of OS versions - not just the very latest toy out there.

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Too soon to buy one that works great
by pdnRPH / March 1, 2013 9:12 AM PST
In reply to: Yes but ......

Too soon to buy a tablet that works great. The real "tablet" is the surface. Not the one from 2012, but the one in 2013. However, too soon means too many $. REDUCE THE PRICE. I have to have my laptop. But, will go tablet IF the price comes down. Further, I will get another laptop --Windows 8 ONLY TOUCH, with lots of RAM, and a supported graphics card with dedicated RAM. Then, a tablet for mobile and quick, and the laptop for real work. iOS will never cut it, because it's not real applications, only shells. Windows 8 will become the one to keep running home and business.

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I have heard that
by timhood / March 1, 2013 11:58 AM PST
In reply to: Yes but ......

I have heard that Android devices are dependent on the manufacturers to make the OS upgrades work for them. Which leads to a catch-22, because upgrading the OS costs money and means users are less likely to upgrade. So they have little motivation, since they don't even make money off of the upgrade.

I have an iPad and have been able to take advantage of free software upgrades. It seems like Apple gives you three major OS versions before your device isn't supported. So, you get the version it came with, along with the minor, incremental upgrades for small features and bug fixes, along with two major OS upgrades. That seems like a reasonable compromise between trying to support older hardware with new software and letting people get decent usage out of their devices. My iPad isn't new, yet I've never had an app that wouldn't work with it, yet.

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Yes - Tablets are cool
by ESUNintel / March 1, 2013 7:57 AM PST

I have an iPad Mini, and often times find myself using it way more than my actual computer. I also recently replaced my Retina MacBook with a Vaio Duo 11, which is a Windows 8 hybrid ultrabook (sort of like an oversized tablet). I must say that having touch abilities on my computer has really changed how I work and has made me more productive by having three ways of interacting with the computer (keyboard, mouse, and touch).

Tablets and touchscreen computers are really changing how we work, game, and explore the web. I don't see why anyone would think twice before getting either.

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tablet.
by lulu_12 / March 1, 2013 8:03 AM PST

I bought a ipad 2 and love it. Very convenient for ebooks and other tasks when waiting at the doctor etc.I noticed that others have had problems with the terrible film which is put onto the screen to protect it. I came across a product called"LIQUID ARMOR" available at the moment only from U.S.A. , excellent .

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Yes
by Ann1460 / March 1, 2013 8:05 AM PST

A gift. Did not want at all. 1.5 yrs later my new, big screen, everything, computer is very lonesome. Of course, it's essential for documents, labels, envelopes, spread sheets, Photoshop, scrapbooking graphics, storage and backup, but when could I be watching a home movie or TV and look up info on the actors, etc. before?
Have taught a weekly iPad session in senior living community since Nov. Very first time most of these (nearly all women) folks have ever used any computing device...and loving it! We all leave happy every time! No virus craziness. Fun apps. FaceTime and Skype very popular. Messaging for those without smart phones. Just plain fun!

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I love my tablet
by rogerpaul / March 1, 2013 8:29 AM PST
In reply to: Yes

I basically use it to hook to my tv and watch movies, (much easier to throw in a DVD), play games on the huge screen and search the internet while still using my tv. I find it much easier then sitting at my desktop cause I can set the tablet on my lap and be much more comfortable.
For photo's and such, I use my desktop. There is no way I'm gonna give up my tablet. Love it.

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Similar story
by timhood / March 1, 2013 12:06 PM PST
In reply to: Yes

I used to have a desktop and a laptop. Then, I got the iPad. What I've found is that the iPad functionally replaces the laptop. I can't ever see getting a laptop again. The laptop used to be that convenient, portable access to computing. I would still largely store my data on my desktop (a shared drive that had tons of storage and was backed up). The laptop let me do things like surf the 'net while sitting in bed and watching TV.

Well, now the laptop has been taken over by the kids and the iPad does everything for me that the laptop did. My desktop still stores the big data--gigabytes of movies and TV shows that we can stream to our Apple TV, tons of music, all of the important documents, etc. Because I invested in a robust storage system (4 drive RAID with a 4 drive RAID backup), I have a large amount of storage I could never get on a laptop (6TB) plus the data is protected by backup. I'd have to tether external drives to a laptop to accomplish the same thing, which would make it rather pointless--an expensive desktop with a smaller screen.

I would never take a laptop to the store or doctor's office, etc., but the iPad is there--ready to let me compare prices, or catch up on e-mail or other tasks during time while I'm waiting or otherwise unproductive. Yes, I could use a smartphone, but for me, the screen is too small. I like being able to see more and have a bigger keyboard. Before getting the iPad, I wasn't sure how much I'd use it, and I suspect a lot of people who don't yet own a tablet feel the same way. Once you've used one and seen all of the ways you can use it, including tons of things you never even thought about, you really see how well it fits into the computing spectrum.

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Eliminates sheet music in binders
by Geartooth / March 1, 2013 8:17 AM PST

I bought it for 1 reason, stop carrying around binders of sheet music when I go to jam. Works amazing with these bluetooth pedals so I don't even have to take my hands off the instrument to turn the pages. I bought a nice convenient music stand that fits the tablet perfectly. Total package weight, less than 3 lbs instead of heavy binders that take forever to find and sort everything to prepare for a gig.
I love it.

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(NT) I love my powerful Laptop.But 1 hand to read book/ email no
by Debra Ammons / March 1, 2013 8:18 AM PST
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I'm not buying and won't contemplate it
by Joe_Wulf / March 1, 2013 8:53 AM PST

As so many others have pointed out, the lack of solid, well-thought out and reasonably priced tablet hardware is of primary concern to me. Additionally, there is the lack of a useful keyboard (think PC or laptop style) as part of the basic machine purchases. You have a BUY a keyboard separately? And, it costs HOW MUCH?? And it isn't as robust or as useful as one from a real computer (PC or laptop)??? Really?????

The cumbersome 'blend' of computer, tablet, phone---along with its awkward size... simply doesn't make sense, nor does it have the polished look and feel of technology that has been well thought out (much less well tested) before going to production and out the door via sales.

Lack of robust local storage is another HUGE problem. Far too often I'm working in places that have some, limited or even NO connectivity. The files, data and applications need to be functional, and immediately present when I need them---not dependent on someone else's network that may or may not be robust enough. The paucity of storage makes these tablets, again, just a fad focused on a niche that maybe can afford them. Please do not 'expect' me to use YOUR cloud concepts just because they conveniently work for you!

Various friends I've talked to from around the country who have made the plunge down the tablet sinkhole---feel that they've wasted their time and money. The usability isn't there, and the troubles are too great. Cute expensive and shiny hardware that eventually sits in a corner, unused and gathering dust--speaks 'FAD' to me, and a gross waste of money. Additionally, friends with college-bound students find they are grappling with the debate between portability of a laptop which would have the diverse computing resources they need for schoolwork and things like tablets that are lacking in basic apps (i.e. open office or even libraoffice).

True, each person has the right to spend money and collect dust however they wish... yet, my biggest concern is an industry (and media) that PUSHES such fads to the hilt, actively persuading people they NEED these latest shiny bits. It is contributing to the dumbing-down direction of over-simplicity of computing devices.

How DO you troubleshoot a tablet? How do you access the 'OS' and actively resolve problems with the innards??

Too easy to steal, is another great problem, with zero effort put forth buy the industry to provide credible protections for this.

Finally, the silly (and expensive) Micro$loth Windoze 8 craze has made this even more of a solid decision on my part to avoid the 'fad' of tablets. I'll stick with modern and reliable hardware (like laptops, PCs and Servers) to handle my computing needs. Also, the challenges with stability in printing make me certain my decision of avoiding tablets is a good one.

I see the issue of tablets being one of convenient portability---not for decent computing power. Tablets seems to be targeted at the light-duty niche... gadget-like and shiny today, while collecting dust in short order. They do seem capable of very casual computing needs, like: web browsing, social networking/chatting, looking at photos, reading a book or article and the like. While the price is pretty hefty for technology that is light on the service(s) provided.

Seriously, I could purchase a reasonable laptop for LESS money and have significantly more computing ability. Opting away from the tablet fad is a no-brainer. The economy of scale for better computing resources at less cost than a tablet, again, make this a simple decision.

Possibly, these tablets 'might' be usable for some folks as a secondary device that fulfills that casual use need... assuming they have the disposable income to support the aquire-more-gadgets quest some folks have. But in this down economy where even having a job is becoming a serious question.... I don't see that happening so much.

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The level of ignorance in this post is astounding...
by Geodude074 / March 1, 2013 11:21 AM PST

<div><div><i>As so many others have pointed
out, the lack of solid, well-thought out and reasonably priced tablet hardware
is of primary concern to me. </i></div>
<div> Are you not aware of the
multitude of form factors that tablets now come in? There are 7 inch tablets, 8.9 inch tablets,
10 inch tablets, and even larger.
Tablets with keyboards. Tablets
with touch covers. Tablets with
kickstands. Tablets with stylus
pens. Prices in tablets range from $69 -
$929. So explain to me how all these
tablets are not solid, not well-thought out, or not reasonably priced? </div>
<div><i>Additionally, there is the lack
of a useful keyboard (think PC or laptop style) as part of the basic machine
purchases. You have a BUY a keyboard separately? And, it costs HOW MUCH?? And
it isn't as robust or as useful as one from a real computer (PC or laptop)???
Really????? </i></div>
<div>Do PCs come with their own
keyboards? Unless you buy the bundled
crap from Walmart, the answer is NO - you have to buy a keyboard separately. Also, you can buy a Bluetooth PC keyboard and
sync it with a tablet, so the price of tablet-sized keyboards (even though they
cost the same) is redundant. </div>
<div><i>The cumbersome 'blend' of
computer, tablet, phone---along with its awkward size... simply doesn't make
sense, nor does it have the polished look and feel of technology that has been
well thought out (much less well tested) before going to production and out the
door via sales. </i></div>
<div>This is just absolute biased
ignorance here. Tablets are
CUMBERSOME, REALLY?! <b>TABLETS ARE THE KINGS OF
PORTABILITY!</b> Can you take your desktop
into bed with you and watch Netflix on it?
No. Can you lie on the couch and hold
your laptop over your head to play games on it?
No. Can you take your desktop
into the car with you and use it as a GPS?
No. Can you take your laptop with
you into the bathroom and use it as an e-reader? No. Can
you take your desktop into the woods with you and use it to find your way
out? No. </div>
<div>And to say that tablets are not
polished and don't look or feel technologically advanced is just pure ignorance
- you've obviously never held a premium tablet in your hands. </div>
<div><i>Lack of robust local storage is
another HUGE problem.

32 GB of internal storage plus 64
GB of additional storage via microSD plus terabytes of storage on the cloud is
plenty of space for me.

Far too often I'm working in
places that have some, limited or even NO connectivity. The files, data and
applications need to be functional, and immediately present when I need them---not
dependent on someone else's network that may or may not be robust enough. The
paucity of storage makes these tablets, again, just a fad focused on a niche
that maybe can afford them. Please do not 'expect' me to use YOUR cloud
concepts just because they conveniently work for you! </i></div>
<div>Explain to me how lugging around
a desktop or laptop to a place with limited or NO connectivity is any better
than bringing a tablet? Oh right, it isn't. </div>
<div><i>Various friends I've talked to
from around the country who have made the plunge down the tablet
sinkhole---feel that they've wasted their time and money. The usability isn't
there, and the troubles are too great. Cute expensive and shiny hardware that
eventually sits in a corner, unused and gathering dust--speaks 'FAD' to me, and
a gross waste of money.</i> </div>
<div>Your subjective experience does
not equate to objective facts. I could say
the exact opposite of what you just said, and it would be just as
relative. In fact I think I will. </div>
<div> Various friends I've talked to
from around the country who have made the leap to tablet heaven --- feel that
they're walking on app utopia, because they are now experiencing one of the
most unique and innovative technological experiences of the 21st
century. Many businesses me and women
feel that tablets offer the exact kind of portability and productivity that
they're looking for - whether they're doctors and nurses using a tablet while
they move from patient to patient, or if they're real estate agents using a
tablet while they travel from different sale sites. </div>
<div><i>True, each person has the right
to spend money and collect dust however they wish... yet, my biggest concern is
an industry (and media) that PUSHES such fads to the hilt, actively persuading
people they NEED these latest shiny bits. It is contributing to the
dumbing-down direction of over-simplicity of computing devices.

Sorry to break it to you, but
tablets aren't fads. </i> </div>
<div>Fads quickly grow
in popularity and then disappear.
Tablets on the other hand are gaining ground and show no signs of
stopping. The media reports on tablets
because tablets are what consumers are interested in right now. Tablets are to the 2010's what personal
computers were to the 1990's. </div>
<div><i>How DO you troubleshoot a tablet?
How do you access the 'OS' and actively resolve problems with the innards?? </i></div>
<div>Once again, your ignorance is
showing. I'll let you Google this one
and figure it out. </div>
<div><i>Too easy to steal, is another
great problem, with zero effort put forth buy the industry to provide credible
protections for this. </i></div>
<div>This is just a stupid argument -
too easy to steal, really? I guess cars
are a stupid fad as well, because they're easy to steal. And you can buy insurance for tablets. </div>
<div><i>Finally, the silly (and expensive)
Micro$loth Windoze 8 craze has made this even more of a solid decision on my
part to avoid the 'fad' of tablets. I'll stick with modern and reliable
hardware (like laptops, PCs and Servers) to handle my computing needs. Also,
the challenges with stability in printing make me certain my decision of
avoiding tablets is a good one.

Tablets were never meant to
replace PCs. Leave PCs for productivity,
and tablets for portability.

Seriously, I could purchase a
reasonable laptop for LESS money and have significantly more computing ability.
Opting away from the tablet fad is a no-brainer. The economy of scale for
better computing resources at less cost than a tablet, again, make this a
simple decision.</i> </div>
<div>I could build my own PC for considerably
LESS money than laptops these days and have more computing power than a laptop
can offer. Does that make laptops
useless and redundant? Of course
not. The same logic applies to tablets. </div>
<div><i>Possibly, these tablets 'might'
be usable for some folks as a secondary device that fulfills that casual use
need... assuming they have the disposable income to support the
aquire-more-gadgets quest some folks have. But in this down economy where even
having a job is becoming a serious question.... I don't see that happening so
much. </i></div>
<div>You're completely wrong on this one. Consumer spending on "needless" devices such
as tablets is actually what drives our economy.
The more we spend, the more GDP we produce, and the more our economy
grows. With high quality tablets soon
about to break the $100 barrier (as opposed to the low-quality Android tablets
that you can find for $50-$60 on Amazon) consumers are going to be able to
obtain tablets even easier. And tablets show no signs of going away anytime
soon.</div></div>

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Poll: Do you own a tablet computer? YES, of course!
by JohnTar / March 1, 2013 9:20 AM PST

I recently bought an Acer W700 tablet, one of the latest Windows 8 units with an 128gig SSD and Intel CPU inside. About twelve months ago I had purchased a Toshiba AT100-100 Android-based tablet (which in the States is called a "Thrive"). There had been a lot of criticism of this tablet in the technical press, and from people who had bought one up until that time. Fortunately, by the time I had mine the various teething problems that had beset early buyers had been cured, and I've not encountered any of those issues at all. Also in that time, my Tosh has been upgraded from the earlier version of the Android OS, through two further stages, up to ICS (Ice Cream Sandwich so-called) and, having been originally fitted out with all of the connectivity one could possibly need, and memory expansion possibilities (unlike the much vaunted iPad series) now, in my opinion, is a superb tablet, if a little long-in-the-tooth by the latest standards of tablet technology! ICS has improved the Tosh immeasurably, and I have kept it as my sole example of Android technology other than a mobile phone, and still use it for my Gmail and some easy gaming - and to amuse my grandchildren when they visit...

So, why the Acer W700 tablet? I have a relatively high-end laptop and a very old (about 8 or 9 years old) desktop PC. I use the laptop for my photography hobby (it's operating on Windows 7). The desktop, operating on XP, is kept really just so that I can dabble and keep my hand in with the older version of Windows - and I would be sorry to see it go truth to tell...). The W700 super-tablet fills a slot in between the laptop and the Tosh: portable, powerful and with the best screen of all of them, and the challenge for an old codger to come to grips with Windows 8 - which I AM doing slowly but surely! And all of the power and memory that I am ever likely to need at age over 70 years! And most importantly of all - loads of fun to use and, at times, abuse I guess!

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No, I don't intend to buy one!
by bahlmary / March 1, 2013 9:22 AM PST

I have two desktop computers and a netbook. I have no desire to own a tablet of any kind. I spend too much time on the computer as it is, and when I leave the house, I don't need to know every little bit of info out there every minute of the day.

We, as a country, are losing our ability to communicate through articulated words. Everything is an acronym, and people can't spell or write a presentable note, letter, or heaven forbid, a term paper, or on a higher level, a thesis?? I am tired of seeing blogs and articles where the words are not used correctly, but they are published anyway.

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I don't really see how those things relate
by timhood / March 1, 2013 12:14 PM PST

It's like saying you won't own a car because too many people shop online and they're killing brick and mortar stores.

Whether people cannot articulate has nothing to do with a tablet, laptop or computer. I has to do with things like education and the fact that kids are so tapped into tech today that it's easier for them to interact that way. Blame FaceBook more than a tablet.

Meanwhile, when your laptop dies, you really ought to look at how the tablet can fill its roll even better. Look objectively and you'll likely favor the tablet. A desktop and tablet make a compelling combo--the desktop does all of your power work: big screen, big storage, etc., and the tablet handles your mobility in a way no laptop could ever hope to.

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I will take my iPad to my grave..
by njsabin / March 1, 2013 9:27 AM PST

It is the most incredible electronics device ever invented. Bless you, Wozniak! Bless you, Jobs! I am constantly finding new ways to use and enjoy it. The proper perspective, I think, is that the iPad is NOT a productivity machine. It is the ultimate information machine. The laptop/desktop computer IS the productivity machine and will always be the efficient way to do real work and make money. The iPad (or any tablet) is for enjoyment. The laptop/desktop is for livelihood..

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Yes but it is no replacement for my laptop
by chillmog / March 1, 2013 9:31 AM PST

I bought a tablet more out of curiosity than anything else. I am underwhelmed with it. The whole thing reminds me of a DOS computer with a touch screen. The big hype is on mobility but it isn't very mobile without a wireless data plan. You need an app for almost anything you want to do. And most of them are cloud based. Not much good when you don't have a connection. OK for those with wireless or plenty of WiFi access points. I even had to look hard for a note taking app that wasn't cloud based. I still haven't found an app for printing that isn't cloud based that will work with my printer.

I have found a few tasks were it is useful. One is in the kitchen. It is handy to pull up a recipe and read it on the screen when cooking. It takes up less space on the counter, you don't have to worry about spilling anything on the keyboard.

For most other tasks it leaves much to be desired. I hate the on-screen keyboard. Sure, there are external keyboards available. But why spend the extra money? You would end up with essentially the same thing as a small laptop that has much more functionality.

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A me too gizmo.
by bl14 / March 1, 2013 9:41 AM PST

If it was not there nobody would ask for it. One of the gazillion things around nobody really needs. Oh, but you cannot watch movies while waiting at the post office.Right.Just the thought makes me suicidal.
We are drowning in products and services they brain washed us to use. At the same time, real quality of life is disappearing or becoming unaffordable. Technology can be great. I have a cell phone for the last 20 years and I cannot imagine giving it up. But this funny thing with a little screen? Not me, not ever.

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One could argue...
by timhood / March 1, 2013 12:21 PM PST
In reply to: A me too gizmo.

Your cell phone is something nobody really needs. Imagine the centuries people managed to live without one. Even imagine how long we had telephones without cell phones. You could go just as crazy and argue the same about cars, even electricity. People managed to live without them. But we have them because they make things easier.

I'll go you one better, though: I have a tablet but no cell phone. With my tablet's data plan, I can make and receive phone calls. I can use any app a phone could while on the go, only with a bigger, more useful screen and keyboard. I'm guessing your phone isn't a smart phone, or you wouldn't have complained about a tablet keyboard. The only thing a cell phone has over a tablet is being able to put it in a pocket. But the tablet wins on every other front. So maybe you have it backwards.

Oh, yeah, I had a cell phone back since 1990, when you got that huge Motorola "brick" and it cost 45 cents a minute to make a call on top of the $45/month base fee. I found it to be a great tool then, as I find the tablet is now--only the tablet is literally an order of magnitude more capable and impressive.

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One could argue..
by bl14 / March 2, 2013 8:53 AM PST
In reply to: One could argue...

I ( and many others) dreamed about a cell phone long before they came. Similarly, people dreamed about machines they could fly over the ocean with or haul their goods with etc. The strong need was there long before the product. Here, we first have a product and then a massive advertising campaign / brainwash gradually creating a need.

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**** Tracy
by krwaniuk / March 3, 2013 8:19 AM PST
In reply to: One could argue..

Remember **** Tracy and his 2-way wrist radio from the 50's? As kids we thought this was pure science fiction. Not much later, when someone commented that one day we might have computers in the home, the comment was "why would we want one and what would we do with it?"

It seems that when something good is invented, we eventually find a use for it and then wonder how we ever lived without them. I think the tablet is much like this. I have an ASUS Prime with detachable keyboard and I think it forms the perfect adjunct to my laptop, which has become the centre of my computing world. My PC's are reserved for 'big jobs' and backup.

Tablets are light, portable and versatile. I don't have a data plan for mine (I have a smartphone with a good long distance and data plan), which I could tether if I really needed to. I travel quite a bit and virtually anywhere I go, including Europe and Asia have good wireless connections available. I can download library books from anywhere in the world and read them at my leisure. the ASUS has a builtin SD card slot, so memory is not an issue and I can view any pictures I take on my camera instantly. I use g+ and facebook, so can view my albums anywhere I can access internet, or just view them off the SD card. Most of my friends will let me sign into their WiFi if I want to show them my albums or pictures. I also use it to stream music when I am away, which I can do even when i am doing other things with it. When I am working on my laptop, I use it to display other files that I have scanned in as pdfs. This is not to mention any of the special purpose apps that are available for it, many of which I also use. It gives me a level of independence which my laptop cannot match.

What's not to like?

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Happy iPad owner
by kcmacguy / March 1, 2013 9:57 AM PST

The iPad experience is unique. Most of the commentators are PC and Android users and so do not have the integrated Apple experience. I started in computers in the DOS 2.2 days and saw computers replace the old handwritten ways of doing so many tasks. Also replacing the typewriter, and eventually records and turntables.
My iPad is not really replacing everything, but is an adjunct device to let me more easily access many items created on my desktop and laptop. I still carry an iPhone, but on my Mac I can save almost anything as a PDF file and read it at my leisure. Same goes for my own videos, YouTube videos and just about anything I want to save from the internet when I don't have WIFI available.

I also can take video with my iPad and edit it, also Photos (free Apple, not stolen software apps). I have purchased Keynote (PowerPoint on the Mac) and Bento (a database), so I can be very productive. I can play any music, video or Photo slideshow from my iPad to my TV through my Apple TV.

The iPad has just expanded the worth of my other Apple devices and it's all about the Apple integration.

p.s. - my wife has an HP with Windows 7 and I have to help her out once in awhile, so I do do Windows yet, but she's always bowworing my iPad to sit on the couch to play Freecell.

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I am learning to love it
by mariegarden / March 1, 2013 10:14 AM PST

After using compters for over 30 years (back to the DOS days) have just purchased a tablet 3 weeks ago and
at first thought I would need another language to use it.
Now really getting to love it. It's a Nexus 7 handy size and as I am always getting lost find it great for directions
on the go.
Ebooks are great and also some free word games. Am still exploring and downloading but am sure it will be
a great relationship. I also love my laptop a 17.3 Samsung R780 and it is great for Paint Shop Pro, spreadsheets,
docs etc but the tablet has many uses and at $330 was a good buy.
Marie

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Had to try it
by rje49 / March 1, 2013 10:35 AM PST

I had a "netbook" but it had a poor touchpad and I didn't care for the screen dimensions. So I sold it and bought a Google Nexus 10, 3 months ago. It's just ok for what I need it for, but the thing I hate the most is the touch screen. Still find it awkward and imprecise. Secondly, I'm disappointed in the way websites are displayed compared to a regular computer. Also, using an operating system I never used before, it can drive me nuts trying to figure out how to do certain things. Having a nice camera and being lighter to carry are the only real advantages I see in it.
If I find a good quality 11 or 12" notebook I may get rid of the tablet.

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NO
by netsiu / March 1, 2013 10:52 AM PST

For the same reson I do not have a Smart Phone. I don't have any need to be instantly or always connected to social or internet.

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Oooh, yes! More than 1..
by Bob_Meyer / March 1, 2013 12:19 PM PST

The family (Mom, Dad, two adult daughters, one adult son) currently own:
- 1 actual tablet (Google Nexus 7)
- 3 Dual boot Nooks (1 Nook Tablet, 2 Nook Color) with N2A Card Jelly Bean
- 2 Lenovo Convertible Netbooks (Win 7, Atom, Touchscreen, twist hinge)
and I'm setting up a Lenovo ThinkPad Twist (Win 8, Core i5, Touchscreen, twist hinge) for mom's sister.

The tablet is just another device in the evolution of the personal computer. I started in computing when it was mainframes with line printers, teletypes and keypunch machines. We all thought shared CRTs were so cool.

Now we have mobile devices with sensors, touch screens, tiny cameras, connected 24/7, cloud computing. Bring it on! I can do things now that were barely imagined a decade ago.

Do I like my tablets? Yes, love 'em. Am I shopping for the next one? All the time. I still have a desk side computer, I have a laptop, I have a tablet and I have a smartphone. I kind of expect the tablet and smartphone to re-converge pretty soon, somehow, through new display technology that makes a 7"-10" screen portable within a 5" form factor. Ultimately, I expect all personal computing to converge into something wearable that will have a head-up display and a high speed connection to whatever size touch screen display you want.

On the other hand, I also expect flying cars.

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Welcome to the BORG collective !!
by ZoltanGZ / March 2, 2013 4:36 AM PST

RESISTANCE IS FUTILE !!

(P.S. They already have flying cars, and one's like KIT2000 that park themselves in a garage and come out to get you when you are ready!!)

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Not a full on tablet
by urbsdad6 / March 1, 2013 12:59 PM PST

However I do own a NOOK Color (couldn't afford a notebook and didn't want the bulk of a notebook at the time) and use an N2A d/l of the latest vers. of Jellybean for Android. Due to the lack of function of the original NOOK Color I was always looking for someway to upgrade it and give it more capability than reading books. Thanks to the Android community I was able to d/l Gingerbread onto a 32GB card and enjoyed the advantages of a tablet in the more portable form factor provided by the NOOK. Now N2A offers a d/l of Jellybean and it's even better. The only thing I'm missing is HD video. As it is I can access and use NOOK and Kindle on the same system along with PDF, ePub, and all the other readers. I can surf the web, shop, listen to podcasts, music, or an audible book, watch Netflix, play games, download files, read email, pretty much everything I would want to do in a small footprint portable format. Tablets are great as an in - between device if you really don't want to lug around a notebook and trying to read from your phone makes your eyes pop out of their sockets. Sure there are compromises for me (screen is smaller than I like, no camera or mic, no skype) but it's great to have an inconspicuous device that can keep track of your stuff when you are out and about going to appts, grocery shopping, etc. and give you something to do in between life happening. As far as cost and amount of storage $200 plus a 32-64GB micro SD card and a $20 d/l for Android OS beats Apple and many of the other offerings out there. A tablet will allow you to access the cloud for docs, music, video, and keep it in a more portable format that is less in the way than a notebook. It's a different niche that has been created and filled by some incredibly powerful and cheap devices and some incredibly expensive ones (you know who you are Appole).

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Sounds like a repeat
by timhood / March 1, 2013 3:18 PM PST

Does anyone else see this as a repeat of the laptop vs. desktop argument that would have been made so many years ago? I wonder how many people who own laptops but say there's no place for a tablet can't see the situation is basically the same?

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No, I do not see a repeat.
by bl14 / March 2, 2013 8:45 AM PST
In reply to: Sounds like a repeat

My 17.5 inch laptop has the same functionality as a desktop and stand most of the time on my desk in a stand/USB hub with a separate full size keyboard. it is less bulky and gives me mobility when needed. No comparison to tablet.

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