TVs & Home Theaters

General discussion

Pixelation in HD action scenes

by Roostalee / February 16, 2005 2:09 AM PST

Is anyone else noticing that HD sets can't handle fast moving action without pixelating the images somewhat? I've seen this on CRT projection, LCD and DLP sets running a true HD signal. In fact, I'm considering buying a tube HDTV because I don't see it occur on those sets, although I'm not crazy about the limited screen size (36" just isn't enough any longer!).

Are there limitations to current HD sets that prevent them from smootly handling FAST pictures changes? I can understand that a bank of 40 TVs at Best Buy, all running the same video feed, will likely result in a loss of quality, so I made sure to monitor only sets running their own discrete feed....but the problem remains. An explosion looks like a bunch of little blocks, a golfer swings a jagged golf club, etc. When things slow back down, the image is awesome, but why sacrifice? What's going on? Is the current crop of TVs not able to reproduce a faithful image that quickly?

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re
by sears tv guy / February 16, 2005 7:38 AM PST

well it depends on the signal broadcast as well. If you are watching a action picture with an interlaced broadcast then yes you are going to probably see some pixelation. A progressive broadcast will be much smoother for action and sports though it does not have all the resolution of the 1080 picture. Also LCd's are know to be slower than most other tv's in moving scenes as to where a dlp picture is much smoother as well.

But until people boradcast in 1080P and you have a tv that can handle the signal you won't get the best possible of both world's.

Sansumg should take care of that next month with their new 1080P dlp pedestal.

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Pixelation in Pans and Zooms and Action scenes
by Roosh88 / January 8, 2006 8:06 AM PST
In reply to: re

I noticed this myself and am somewhat bothered by it. I am considering purchasing the Sony 42" rear-projection LCD vs. the Samsung 42" rear-projection DLP. The LCD picture looked sharper, but the pixelation during quick camera pans was much worse. From the sounds of things DLP does this too, but I didn't really notice it. Do Plasma TV's have this problem? Is it worth spending the extra bucks for a plasma for this? Should I wait for the 1080i format? (Will this really fix this problem and will the networks even broadcast in this format?) For all the raves out there for HDTV picture (I agree, it is awesome) you never hear people talk much about this issue.

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not a problem
by HTHMAN / January 8, 2006 9:32 AM PST

Have never had the problem with my HD plasma. Have you seen the same problem with plasma and CRTs in the stores? If so, it is the feed.

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Is Plasma worth the extra bucks?
by Roosh88 / January 8, 2006 9:16 PM PST
In reply to: not a problem

I will go back to the store and check out the Plasma. I can never recall this happening on my friend's plasma screen. Is Plasma so much more expensive than DLP because it is a more costly technology or just because it is just plain better?

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Re
by Psych Doc / January 8, 2006 11:25 PM PST

...***Is Plasma so much more expensive than DLP because it is a more costly technology or just because it is just plain better? ***

Yes and yes.

;~)

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Was to me
by HTHMAN / January 9, 2006 1:05 PM PST

After looking at all the technologies, I came down to CRT and Plasma. Plasma is coming down in price and is closer to DLP and LCD now. Remember, on an LCD or DLP projection TV, you will be replacing the 300 dollar bulb every 4000 or so hours. A plasma screen is more like 60,000 hours to half-brightness. CRTs are great if you have the space. To me, plasma was worth it.

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Pixelation in HD action scenes
by jcrobso / January 9, 2006 12:20 AM PST

Now that I had my HDTV for a few weeks, I have seen this from time to time. A lot depends on the source material, it may just have been encoded that way. Not all "HD" material is full HD, some may have been up scalled from ED to make it look HD. If the material has a narrow bandwith MPEG2 will NOT be able to handel fast changes.
John

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Questions
by Roosh88 / January 9, 2006 11:16 AM PST

"Now that I had my HDTV for a few weeks, I have seen this from time to time."

Q: What type of TV do you have?

When I saw the pixelation in the store, it was during an NFL Wildcard playoff game. You would think they would broadcast that with a pretty wide bandwith, but who knows?

Is it possible it is the broadcast in the store? They split the signal a gizzilion times.

I would like to get the Sony KDF-E42A10, but I am really worried about this pixelation problem.

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