HDTV Picture Setting forum

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Pix Shape Question - Sanyo DP46849

by perrier1 / October 12, 2009 2:02 PM PDT

I just got a Sanyo DP46849 and I cannot figure out the "pix shape" I am supposed to be using. I am using the HDMI input for a Blu-ray/DVD player (no TV/cable). The picture looks best in pix 6 or 7 (looks the same), but the manual says pix 6 or 7 are setup as pix 1-2 in PC mode and use of pix 6-7 in TV mode is not recommended.

The picture is distorted (pressed tight in pix 1 and stretched too tall in pix 2-5. A 1.85 to 1 movie will have no black bars at the bottom/top in pix 2-5, which it should since the TV is 1.77 to 1. Pix shapes 6 or 7, which are not recommend for TV mode, will have the slight bars.

Anyone else have this or another Sanyo? Can using this pix 6-7 damage the TV? What are the pix 1-7 settings? Which one should I be using?

(I have only been watching standard DVD's because I do not not have any blu-rays, yet.)

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Sanyo's pix 1 thru 7 description - pix shape
by monymoviestar / September 12, 2010 11:40 PM PDT

Pix1
Shows a standard definition 4:3 image
in its original format, and a 16:9 wide
image is slightly shrunk horizontally.
NOTE: Vertical bars are ?attached? to the
sides of the screen.

Pix2
Fills the entire image on the screen.
NOTE: A standard definition 4:3 image is
stretched horizontally.

Pix3
Image is stretched vertically in comparisson
with Pix2.
NOTE: Shows a proportional Zoom for a 4:3
transmission.

Pix4
Image is stretched horizontally in comparisson
with Pix3.
NOTE: Shows a proportional Zoom for a
16:9 transmission.

Pix5
Similar to Pix2, image is enlarged horizontally
in a linear proportion in which
center portion of screen is stretched
less than the sides.
NOTE: Pix5 has almost no stretching effect
on a 16:9 transmission.

PIX SHAPE
NOTE: There are other possible aspect ratios that
may be transmitted besides 4:3 and 16:9.

Pix6 Similar to Pix1 with no Overscan*

Pix7 Similar to Pix2 with no Overscan*
* Overscan permits the image to slightly exceed bottom and top edge limitations.

NOTE: Pix6 and Pix7 displays are not optimal pix-shapes due to the possibility of transmitted image not filling the
top or bottom edge of screen.

Pix-Auto (AFD) Active Format Description. Data carried in the video stream includes coded picture
frame information of the actual image, allowing the TV to adjust the Pix-Shape automatically.
NOTE: This Pix-Shape mode is available only for Digital-RF input.

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Pix Shape Question - Thank you
by RangerPHX / November 30, 2010 2:21 AM PST

I have been looking for this DETAILED answer for a long while and your thoughtful reply to the question was most thoroughly answered in the fullest detail; for which I thank you. I had been unable to find this detail anywhere until I found this Link @ BING.

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