TVs & Home Theaters forum

Question

NEW Yamaha vs OLD Integra Receiver--which is better?

by nazird / December 1, 2012 2:23 AM PST

I am considering replacing my 10 yr old Integra HTR 7.2 receiver with a Yamaha or other receiver in the $500-$600 range. (To replace the Integra would cost $2000). The key driver is to simplify wiring to my new TV (i.e use HDMIs vs component video etc)---my question is: will a NEW receiver in the $500-$600 range produce as good quality sound (because of technology improvement) as my OLD Integra. I know a NEW Integra priced at $2000 will produce better sound than a $500-$600 Yamaha/Denon/Sony---but I am very happy with having the sound as good as it was before----WOULD LOVE TO GET ADVICE FROM THE PROS!!

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All Answers

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Answer
Sound is still subjective.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / December 1, 2012 2:36 AM PST

However integrating an old analog system into today's HD systems seems to be trouble for many as they discover lip sync and more issues.

We have a deep issue/problem on how to declare that sound is good or best. We can be very sure that your price range will not be "bad" as in what you get from a cassette tape but you have audiophiles that you can't placate and best left alone.

-> My thought is you should try to use what you have and if it won't integrate then you move up.
Bob

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Old vs New Receiver
by nazird / December 4, 2012 8:53 PM PST

I think I will keep my old Integra and connect my devices (Fios TV, Apple TV and Blu Ray) directly via HDMI to TV for video. For sound I will connect these three (plus a Rotel CD player) to receiver via digital audio or RCA. I will check this out before mounting to make sure I dont have lip-syn issues. I have nice Toem speakers so that is not an issue.

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Answer
What Bob said. Truth be told though, it's the speakers
by Pepe7 / December 1, 2012 4:13 AM PST

That's the most important important part of the equation. For great quality sound, you should focus on where electrical turns into mechanical energy (e.g. you get the appropriate sound waves that come from the speakers, then are interpreted by your ears/brain). Match great speakers to one of those 'bargain' priced $5-600 newer AV receivers and you can still have very good sound. In other words, most consumers don't allocate enough $ to the speakers but mistakenly focus on the receiver.

That said, if you old receiver has all the ports you need in the short term (thinking it likely does not though), I don't see the need to change. If you need HDMI of course to connect various newer inputs/components, that might be a reason to switch, but not necessarily for sound quality.

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Old vs New Speakers
by nazird / December 4, 2012 8:54 PM PST

I think I will keep my old Integra and connect my devices (Fios TV, Apple TV and Blu Ray) directly via HDMI to TV for video. For sound I will connect these three (plus a Rotel CD player) to receiver via digital audio or RCA. I will check this out before mounting to make sure I dont have lip-syn issues. I have nice Totem speakers so that is not an issue.

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