HDTV Picture Setting

General discussion

Needed - Calibration Settings for Sony KDL-46Z5100

by clarancem / September 11, 2009 4:21 PM PDT

Can someone please assist with the settings for the Sony KDL-46Z5100? Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Post a reply
Discussion is locked
You are posting a reply to: Needed - Calibration Settings for Sony KDL-46Z5100
The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Please refer to our CNET Forums policies for details. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Track this discussion and email me when there are updates

If you're asking for technical help, please be sure to include all your system info, including operating system, model number, and any other specifics related to the problem. Also please exercise your best judgment when posting in the forums--revealing personal information such as your e-mail address, telephone number, and address is not recommended.

You are reporting the following post: Needed - Calibration Settings for Sony KDL-46Z5100
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.
Collapse -
Calibration Settings for Sony KDL-46Z5100
by ptvillan / January 3, 2010 3:03 PM PST

These are the settings for my Sony. The TV was calibrated professionally (not by those "Geeks") with the TV hooked-up via HDMI. Here are the settings:

Screen:
Wide Mode: Full
Auto Wide: On
4:3 Default: Normal
Display Area: Full Pixel

Picture:
Backlight: 5
Picture: 88
Brightness: 59
Color: 50
Hue: 0
Color Temp: Neutral
Sharpness: 8
Noise Reduction: Off
MPEG Noise Reduction: Off
Black Corrector: Low
Advanced C.E.: Off
Gamma: Medium
Clear White: Off
Color Space: Wide
Live Color: Low
R-Gain: 0
G-Gain: -7
B-Gain: -5
R-Bias: -1
G-Bias: -2
B-Bias: 1

BTW, my TV is in a room with good light control and the TV is hooked up to my AV receiver (a Marantz SR-5004). My cable box and PS3 are all routed through the AVR via HDMI. The picture is absolutely perfect! Some other info, I bought my TV around August 2008 from Dell. According to the technician who calibrated the TV, settings can vary within the same model based on the "batch" it was made.
Hope this all helps!

Collapse -
Hmmmm.
by dsskid / February 8, 2010 3:59 AM PST

Being that you mentioned Color Space: Wide, I'm going to assume that your calibrations are for the XBR9 model and not the Z5100 model.

Additionally, if it is the Z5100 model, I find it strange that your professional calibrator would have calibrated your display in the Nuetral color temp, since this contains a very inaccurate color gamut, and the causes the grayscale to heavily favor blue, which I would have expected your white balance settings to reflect blue gains and blue bias to be a higher negative number.

Also, if he were a professional calibrator, he would have noticed that the black corrector crushed black, and with a backlight set at 5, picture at 88, brightness set at 59, and a gamma set to medium, which I assume you meant 2, would have probably given you eyestrain.

For the Z5100, I calibrated the display using CalMAN software, and a Sencore OTC1000 meter. The optimal settings that I achieved, based on a light controlled room are:

Screen:
Wide Mode: ...........................Full
Auto Wide: ...........................On
4:3 Default: .........................Normal
Display Area: ........................Full Pixel
Picture Mode .........................Custom
Scene ................................Auto (or General)
Wide Mode: ???...................???..Full
4:3 Default: ??????..Normal
Display Area: Full Pixel
Backlight ..............................4
Picture .............................?.87
Brightness ............................50
Color .................................46
Hue ...............................?....0
Color Temperature .....................Warm 2
Sharpness ........................?.....6
Noise Reduction .......................Off
MPEG Noise Reduction ..................Off
MotionFlow ............................Normal (Cable), Off (BD)
CineMotion ............................Auto 1 (Cable), Off (BD)

ADVANCED SECTION

Black Corrector .......................Off
ACE ...................................Off
Gamma .................................0
Auto Light Limiter ....................Off
Clear White ...........................Off

WHITE BALANCE

Red Gain .............................-14
Green Gain .........................?...0
Blue Gain .............................?0
Red Bias..............................?.1
Green Bias ............................-1
Blue Bias ..............................0

Please note, these settings should be used as a starting point only. Your room color scheme, lighing conditions may differ from mine, and each panel differs slightly from each other.

Enjoy.

Collapse -
Thanks for these settings!
by chellspecker / October 30, 2012 2:10 AM PDT

I know this is an old thread, but I've been scouring the web for settings that reflect accurate colors from a variety of sources, including when I am using my TV hooked up to a computer for photo editing, and these are the first ones I've found that seem to accurately reflect the biases of this set.

To me, it just makes sense to start with a neutral color temperature, as presumably it is neutral, and therefore reflects a balanced mixture of the component colors. I think the Neutral setting only looks cool or blue in comparison to the the Warm 1 and 2 settings as these are obviously intended to present a warmer tone favoring reds, oranges, and yellows, for which you would then have to correct back to some approximation of neutral. Why not just start with neutral to begin with? I've been testing it with a HD television show which includes scenes shot in both more blue-tinged outdoor settings and intimate indoor ones with incandescent light, and both are equally well-represented with your settings. Thanks again. I've tried settings posted by dsskid and a fellow named Will Munshower on different forums and neither were satisfactory. I found with these I inevitably reset to factory settings after a while and it actually improved the image quality. As for eye strain, I could reduce the backlight at certain times, when I'm using the TV as a monitor for extended periods of time. I find the higher setting gives a much wider dynamic range to the content I was testing, where with lower brightness and backlight, all detail is lost from dark areas of the image, which simply collapse into blackness. It's particularly evident in scenes shot at night. I assumed that your gamma "medium" meant in the middle of the range, ie. 0. Is that correct?

Perhaps it's simply from living on the northern west coast of the continent with very blue light that I've become accustomed to it? I think it's difficult to get an acceptable calibration without a professional, and I can't afford to pay one to come and do it. By the way, nice receiver! I have a Marantz 2250 audio receiver that's probably forty years old and it produces excellent sound. I should look into getting an AV receiver, it would be nice to experience surround sound with my set-up. I've never been interested in a cable signal, I just watch TV series and movies on my computer, hooked up via HDMI directly to the set with audio through the Marantz, or on Netflix on my PS3, also directly hooked up. The sound on this set is fantastic.

Take care, and thanks again.

Popular Forums
icon
Computer Help 47,885 discussions
icon
Computer Newbies 10,322 discussions
icon
iPhones, iPods, & iPads 3,188 discussions
icon
Security 30,333 discussions
icon
TVs & Home Theaters 20,177 discussions
icon
HDTV Picture Setting 1,932 discussions
icon
Phones 15,713 discussions
icon
Windows 7 6,210 discussions
icon
Networking & Wireless 14,510 discussions

Tech Tip

Know how to save a wet phone?

It's not with a dryer and it's not with rice. CNET shows you the secret to saving your phone.