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Move data off failing hard drive

by phasere / January 28, 2008 3:40 AM PST

I've replaced a hard drive which was retuning multiple bad sectors during a chkdsk scan. The failing drive was under warranty so seagate sent me a replacement with 30 days to transfer files.

When I began the transfer last night of about 30 gigs of files, it gets about 3 minutes into it then I hear what sounds like the hard drive arm slap against the case once and the transfer stops. I get a read error and the bad drive disappears from 'My Computer'. I'm running XP PRO SP2.

My question is...Is there any easy way to get the data off without taxing the drive? Could I pull a disk image using Ghost of a similar program and copy that to the new drive? Would that copy the bad sectors as well?


Thanks for your help.

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Some data may be lost
by At The Opera / January 28, 2008 4:23 AM PST

First thing you need to do is accept that some of the data on that drive may be gone forever.

Second thing I'd do, is use a file transfer program that supports resuming. Total Copy is such a program, and there might be some other file manager programs that will do it as well. I would also copy things in multiple small segments. Maybe one or two gigs at a time for example, and just break it up into 15-30 operations. However you may find that certain data will always trigger the reaction you got the last time, and if that's the case, your only hope would be data recovery specialists.

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thanks for the word on Total Copy
by phasere / January 28, 2008 4:35 AM PST
In reply to: Some data may be lost

I'll give that a shot tonight, and try smaller copy segments.

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Any thoughts on ghosting?
by phasere / January 28, 2008 4:36 AM PST

Just wondering if that's a bad idea in this situation.

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If you have GHOST or Acronis True Image ...
by Edward ODaniel / January 28, 2008 8:06 AM PST

i would suggest making an image of the drive (if it keeps spinning so GHOST can read it) either to DVD or another hard drive.

I would NOT try cloning it to the new drive but after getting the new drive installed, partitioned, formatted and the OS installed and patched you could install the imaging application you used and make use of the application's capability to mount the image and then restore your data files to a location of your choice.

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drive is dead
by phasere / January 29, 2008 1:17 AM PST

Drive disappears as soon as I try and access it.

Oh well. Thanks for your help.

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drive is dead
by IAN-ian / February 1, 2008 8:55 AM PST
In reply to: drive is dead

Hi Ive had the same problem in the past so i brought an identical hard drive swapped the inside from the old to the new and was able to access my dater, also sent back the broken hd witch was less than a year old and got sent a new one. Might not be very hi tec but it works good luck just keep it simple

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Don't write it off just yet...
by skycatcher / February 1, 2008 10:52 PM PST
In reply to: drive is dead

See if you can access it from a Windows 98 floppy boot disk.

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thanks for the tips...
by phasere / February 2, 2008 3:34 AM PST

I'll try spinrite and if that doesn't work I'll try to swap the platters.

Just out of curiosity, why are some drives accessible from dos but not the OS?


Thanks for your help.

John

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OS Drive Is Probably NTFS While The Others May Be FAT32?
by Grif Thomas Forum moderator / February 2, 2008 10:34 AM PST
In reply to: thanks for the tips...

NTFS can't be access from a standard DOS/Command prompt.

Hope this helps.

Grif

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while the OS is running?
by phasere / February 2, 2008 2:52 PM PST

My drive is NTFS. Will that prevent me from using this DOS tool?

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A Win98 Boot Floppy Will Not Allow You To Read NTFS
by Grif Thomas Forum moderator / February 3, 2008 3:32 AM PST

I'm not sure which "tool" you're referring to.. If you're referring to Spinrite...then I've not been able to "recover" files on an NTFS drive that is dead.. It may be worth your while to "try" as Spinrite is a great tool for detecting bad sectors and fixing them but my attempts have been unsuccessful when the drive simply isn't accessable.

You will probably need to contact a recovery company to save the data from the disc.

Hope this helps.

Grif

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Why Not Clone Failing Drive to New Drive?
by kc270 / April 23, 2009 7:23 AM PDT

I know this thread is over a year old, but I'll give this a shot, anyway.

Why the advice against cloning to a new drive? I am facing the same situation with a failing hard drive. I would like to keep it simple and clone the primary partition and restore it to a new drive. Do you end up bringing problems from the old drive to the new?

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Depends On Whether The Drive Is Corrupted Or Not..
by Grif Thomas Forum moderator / April 23, 2009 7:38 AM PDT

How "bad" is the failing drive? If you KNOW it's still good, go for it.. On the other hand, if you're not sure, using a different saved image is the better option for ensuring the transferred files aren't corrupted.

It's all about RISK..

Hope this helps.

Grif

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NTFS really IS Available from DOS
by skycatcher / February 3, 2008 3:53 AM PST
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Only If You've Installed NTFSDOS FIRST...
by Grif Thomas Forum moderator / February 3, 2008 4:15 AM PST

Your statement: "NTFS really IS Available from DOS" isn't quite correct in this case.. The drive info will be available only If You've Installed NTFSDOS FIRST.....which in this case, the user has NOT. "After the crash" won't get it done.

And yes, Spinrite is able to recover files IF, and that's a big IF, the hard drive isn't lacking in hardware functionality.. That DOES appear to be the issue here based on the "hard drive arm slapping" reference. The platter may be fine by the hardware simply doesn't work anymore.

Hope this helps.

Grif

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NTFS via DOS & hard drive arm slapping
by skycatcher / February 3, 2008 8:11 AM PST
Ref: "only If You've Installed NTFSDOS FIRST"

I admit that I haven't tried this one but I did not see that statement on this page - http://www.ntfs.com/products.htm
Try these two - http://www.bootdisk.com/ntfs.htm - and there are loads more out there ( Google it and see ).

REF: "That DOES appear to be the issue here based on the "hard drive arm slapping" reference."

Possibly... but HDD arm slapping is a sign that it can't read a certain sector so the arm swings back to 'position zero' to have another go at getting the right place.
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