Peripherals forum


Laptop Battery Compatability

by Lost_in_Tech / November 15, 2012 6:46 AM PST

I would like to buy a spare battery for my Lenovo Ideapad Z575. The part numbers on the original battery appear to be: L09M6Y02 and 3ICR1/65-2.

Lenovo's price is over £100 but there are several APPARENTLY compatible alternatives (quoting same L09 number and model range) on Amazon and various other online retail sites, in the £25-£50 range.

BUT... they all appear to be Nom 10.6v or 10.8v ...whereas the original says it is Nom 11.1v 48Wh.

Is this just a power/performance difference, or would using a different voltage be "A Bad Thing" ?

Basically I am a bear with very little tech savvy, and do not want to smoke my laptop, so any advice would be gratefully received!

Many thanks guys.

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All Answers

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by pgc3 / November 15, 2012 10:21 PM PST

I have known people to use aftermarket batteries and A/C adapters with laptops some had good results some others did not. Personally I use nothing but oem units with my laptops having seen a couple of pretty bad situations occur for some who used aftermarket components that proved incompatible and/or insufficient to the task.

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You never know
by Willy / November 16, 2012 9:37 PM PST

There are two answers for you:

1) buy from maker(OEM)
2) buy from other than maker or OEM

From that you decide to buy new or used and/or rebuild(certified). If a vendor offers it's the one for your laptop, then read the warranty and/or return policy is something goes wrong.

You need to use the exact part# or one found on decal/sticker and google away as you did. Then you need to pick from a vendor that you trust. While saving money is a concern, be sure of what you're getting, brand new or refurbished(rebuild) Yes, battery packs can be redone. They also can come in various "hour range" for battery output life. Provided your model laptop falls into such, then decide what makes sense to you. I mention trust, because some vendors are nothing more than small cottage outfits to massive warehouses that stockpile it all. Sometimes buying "used" is a decent deal if the life of the battery is still very useful, but it must be so ID'ed as used. I hope this all helps. You may have a local battery source, so check your telco area. In the USA, there are battery shops offering everything from watch to auto, to include laptop batteries.

tada -----Willy Happy

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Thanks, but...
by Lost_in_Tech / November 16, 2012 11:10 PM PST
In reply to: You never know

I'm grateful to both respondents for their advice, which makes sense, but my dilemma is not really whether I go for OEM or aftermarket, but if the latter, is a voltage difference a problem?

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Let's talk about your tolerence to risk.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / November 17, 2012 1:51 AM PST
In reply to: Thanks, but...

If this must work, get the maker or OEM model. If you are fine with risk and know that there is a little slosh in the specs on battery voltages then you know the answer.

I will NEVER tell folk to pick up a cheap battery. The risk is far too high to give that advice. Folk must decide risk on their own.

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Well I guess that puts it in perspective.
by Lost_in_Tech / November 17, 2012 3:10 AM PST

Clearly there is a risk then. I cannot afford an OEM version, but neither can I afford a new laptop. I think I will just manage without. I get around 3 hours from the current one, but frequently use the machine in places where I can't recharge

Thanks for the advice.

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3 hours is fine. Why would I write that?
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / November 17, 2012 3:42 AM PST

When it comes to batteries my worry is when the time gets down to under an hour. This means the battery has gotten old and will stress the charger and charger circuits. Your laptop's battery is in the normal wear pattern and about all I can advise is you triple check things such as wifi/bluetooth off if possible and make sure you didn't install something like Spybot or set the antivirus to scan daily.

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Indeed - 3hrs is not bad
by Lost_in_Tech / November 17, 2012 5:22 AM PST

I'm not in anyway unhappy with the current battery, I just wanted another so I could swap over, and keep working for another hour or two. In my naivety, seeing that the voltage appeared to be the only real difference between similarly numbered and named batteries, I thought maybe they just come in different strengths, or longevities of charge, and I might get away with an economy back up. Your caution suggests its not worth buying a cheap one and risking damage to the machine for an extra hour or so of typing time... The Booker Prize judges will just have to wait for me! Happy

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