Spyware, Viruses, & Security forum

Question

Is Ooyala subject to viruses because it uses P2P?

by si / February 16, 2013 12:10 AM PST

I read the following post about Ooyala and so I am wondering if it is subject to viruses because of the P2P it uses? Anyone have any insight on this?

"Ooyala itself has done some really impressive stuff with Flash video. They wanted to create the best user experience for people downloading HD content regardless of the bandwidth the user has. In that vein they implemented dynamic bitrate adaption which keys off on the available bandwidth and display resolution. This means that the buffer times for every user will be minimized regardless of their connection. They do this by combining progressive download, streaming, and P2P which gives them ultimate flexibility. It also means that the video can scale up in bitrate as you watch it so the viewing experience gets better as you go."

http://www.zdnet.com/blog/stewart/ooyala-soft-launches-backlot-a-video-analytics-and-management-tool/631

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Clarification Request
Do you understand how P2P ...
by Edward ODaniel / February 16, 2013 9:41 AM PST

works?

EVERYONE using the P2P client is also acting as a server and offering up bit of the file they have already downloaded. If you substitute some code in bits of the file you can cause strange things to happen on the recipient's end when they open or install the file.

Some alter insignificant parts of the code while others take a lazy man's approach and change the code so you get a message that boils down to a corrupt file so download again. By then the damage is done and the malware is running.

That is possible but it isn't saying that it definitely will happen as it depends on who all use the client and their intents.

There is nothing inherently bad about P2P, just the users and how they use it and what they use it for.

Think of going to a potluck meal (P2P file) where everyone brings a couple of dishes. Many dishes will be duplicated so everyone gets a meal but not everyone necessarily gets the same meal. If YOU (or I or someone or two others) bring some spoiled shrimp or bad chicken (insert some bad code) most who eat it will have problems (malware) while others who ate at the same meal but took their shrimp or chicken from a different bowel (peer server) get what they were expecting and are happy campers -- P2P in action.

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Yes I do!
by si / February 16, 2013 12:59 PM PST

That is exactly why I asked the question. The fact that they use P2P in addition to streaming bothers me.

All Answers

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Answer
In short, ANY APP can be hijacked if
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / February 16, 2013 12:22 AM PST

If someone finds an exploit then the app is in short, jacked.

Since Flash has security issues, then any security issue Flash has is inherited by the app. Some folk need it said so I've done that.

It's not the P2P issue so much as the fact that no app is totally secure. And if your app uses other apps such as Flash then you inherit it's issues.
Bob

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