iPhones, iPods, & iPads forum

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IPad Basics?

by Tosca / January 24, 2013 9:59 AM PST

Hello --

I'm considering buying and IPad (or Mini) but insecure about a few areas: 1) will I be able to "transfer" pdfs, .docs, and other text files from my MacBook (under 10.4.11) to the new device and if so, how? 2) comfortable reading of pdfs is a big need for me - does the iPad use reflow? and 3) I know zero about wifi - what's the cost of an IPad or Mini beyond the the device itself?

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Plenty of good options for that stuff
by Pepe7 / January 24, 2013 11:25 AM PST
In reply to: IPad Basics?

1) Yes, you can transfer over everything. iCloud might not be an option since you are running an older OS. In that case, I would get everything into Dropbox and simply install the Dropbox app on your iPad to sync everything.

2) I am 99% certain that iOS does not use text reflow. Check the Apple site's discussion forum for the skinny on that topic. That said though, I have had absolutely zero issues with reading a whole boatload of different document types on my wife's new iPad. It's a better experience than I expected, actually. She's actually about to get rid of her Nook because epubs work so well on that device ;).

3) wifi refers to a type of wireless internet. There's no extra charge for utilizing wifi on your iPad unless you happen to be attempting to connect to a paid wifi network at some coffee shops or airports. Most folks are using free wifi access points though, such as their home broadband network (Cable or DSL internet provider, for example).

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IPad cont
by Tosca / January 24, 2013 1:27 PM PST

Thanks, Pepe7 - good, useful information.
Another question while I've got you: I have no intention of giving up my Tiger MacBook which I use for internet access, or my old PC that I use for my work, but am wondering about getting to my email on the IPad. I use WebMail through Earthlink DSL on the MacBook - would I be able to download email attachments to both my MacBook and the IPad?

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Yes- just use the Mail app
by Pepe7 / January 24, 2013 11:39 PM PST
In reply to: IPad cont

It's built in, and quite straight-forward/useful. Once your providers email details are entered in the Settings > Mail, you can access all your attachments on the server. Most of the attachments can also be saved to the iPad, or possibly to Dropbox, etc., depending on how you have everything set up.

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IPad cont
by Tosca / January 25, 2013 2:42 AM PST

Thanks - you've been very helpful!

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