Speakeasy

Tip

How to win an election

by JP Bill / November 8, 2012 4:17 AM PST

Tell them what they want to hear.

Get them to believe you.

Get them out to vote.

Seems fairly obvious.

Post a reply
Discussion is locked
You are posting a reply to: How to win an election
The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Please refer to our CNET Forums policies for details. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Track this discussion and email me when there are updates

If you're asking for technical help, please be sure to include all your system info, including operating system, model number, and any other specifics related to the problem. Also please exercise your best judgment when posting in the forums--revealing personal information such as your e-mail address, telephone number, and address is not recommended.

You are reporting the following post: How to win an election
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.
Collapse -
You're right
by Steven Haninger / November 8, 2012 5:28 AM PST
In reply to: How to win an election

But how do you win twice using the same method?

Collapse -
(NT) Appear to be better/more believable than your opponent.
by JP Bill / November 8, 2012 5:31 AM PST
In reply to: You're right
Collapse -
So either or both can lie like a rug but
by Steven Haninger / November 8, 2012 5:40 AM PST

success is really in the delivery and not the verity. Got it.

Collapse -
Now ya' got it....
by JP Bill / November 8, 2012 5:52 AM PST

I'll see you in the Beltway

Collapse -
From the best article I've read about the election
by Ziks511 / November 11, 2012 3:12 AM PST

"Daniel Patrick Moynihan might be surprised to learn that he is now remembered most for his oft-repeated maxim that "everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts." Yet today most Americans do see themselves as entitled to their own facts, with one of our two major political parties setting a powerful example. For all the hand-wringing about Washington's chronic dysfunction and lack of bipartisanship, it may be the wholesale denial of reality by the opposition and its fellow travelers that is the biggest obstacle to our country moving forward under a much-empowered Barack Obama in his second term. If truth can't command a mandate, no one can."

Last paragraph of this article http://nymag.com/news/frank-rich/gop-denial-2012-11/ which begins this way
"Mitt Romney is already slithering into the mists of history, or at least La Jolla, gone and soon to be forgotten. A weightless figure unloved and distrusted by even his own supporters, he was always destined, win or lose, to be a transitory front man for a radical-right GOP intent on barreling full-speed down the Randian path laid out by its true 2012 standard-bearer, Paul Ryan."

Bob Kerrey said "All politicians lie, he (Clinton) is just unusually good at it."

"All politicians lie, and some of them, as Bob Kerrey famously said of Bill Clinton in 1996, are "unusually good" at it. Every campaign (certainly including Obama's) puts up ads that stretch or obliterate the truth. But Romney's record was exceptional by any standard. The blogger Steve Benen, who meticulously curated and documented Mitt's false statements during 2012, clocked a total of 917 as Election Day arrived."

Why do politicians lie? Because Hitler was right, the Electorate is Feminine and possesses a herd mentality, if you tell them the truth, they spook, but if you rattle a container that sounds like its filled with grain, they'll accompany you right into the barn. The only politician who was reasonably straight with the voters was FDR, and he only got away with it because the Electorate was so shell-shocked by the Republican created Depression of 1929 (the R's were in charge from 1920 to 1932 beginning the Harding Administration and Tea Pot Dome). FDR told them hard times were ahead, that there would have to a massive reorganization of the economy and of government. He didn't think it would take until WW2 to pull the US out of Depression, how could he, Hitler hadn't even been elected, he thought that recovery would start around 1937 or so, and was incredibly surprised by the 1936 mini Depression at the beginning of recovery. But his beliefs and his statements, made him a liar when the economy didn't respond as expected.

FDR's master stroke were the "fire-side chats" those ?weekly? broadcasts with which he shared his thoughts and plans and hopes with the American public. Despite the hatred of the 1% and the Radical Republicans, the mass of voters felt they were included in the governance of the country, at least as a silent partner. The problem with most Presidents is that, especially since the paranoid Richard Nixon, they try to lock everyone out of the process, to keep everything hidden especially the bad news. In this fashion, the US is very different from Great Britain. You tell unpleasant truths to the British, and they go, "Doesn't surprise me", or "That's just what I reckoned" and tend to unite behind the PM, if you try to pull a Tony Blair and do a Clinton, you might get a second term, but it's unlikely you'll get more than that.

Rob

Collapse -
Bribe them with their own money via Tax Cuts which will have
by Ziks511 / November 11, 2012 2:34 AM PST
In reply to: How to win an election

to be paid for by those same people under the next President. It worked for Reagan and Bush.

And whether the Looney Right believe it or not, the reason Obama was elected head of Harvard Law Review was because of his ability to win over the conservatives there (source, Frontline bio of Obama). He was, and is a centrist who disappoints the Left as much as he angers the Right. Maybe it's because we Lefties got so much of that anger out of our systems during the Viet Nam War, that we keep our arguments behind closed doors. Oh, and we have no racial animus against him unlike White Males, and some White Women. though he won that vote.

Rob

Collapse -
How to lose an election
by Steven Haninger / November 11, 2012 3:06 AM PST
In reply to: How to win an election

Tell them the hard truth (which isn't what they want to hear)

Let them believe if they choose to (no carny talk allowed)

Ask them to vote (don't tell them to do it...no prodding. allow them to decide)

Honesty and passivity loses every time.

Collapse -
Honesty and passivity loses every time.
by JP Bill / November 11, 2012 3:17 AM PST

Especially when the voter doesn't agree with what you say you'll do....Changing horses in mid-stream helps also.

Were you telling the truth at the start of the campaign or are you telling the truth now?

Unfortunately OR fortunately we'll never know if Romney was telling the truth or if HE was lying.

In 4 years you'll know if Obama was lying.

Collapse -
I think more properlly stated
by Steven Haninger / November 11, 2012 4:04 AM PST

in 4 years we'll know if Obama was still lying?

Collapse -
(NT) well said
by James Denison / November 11, 2012 6:56 PM PST
Collapse -
(NT) we are talking about a politician aren't we?
by Roger NC / November 12, 2012 11:12 AM PST
Collapse -
So you mean
by Steven Haninger / November 12, 2012 5:42 PM PST

it's a given? Wink

Collapse -
(NT) anyone seeking political office is suspect
by Roger NC / November 12, 2012 7:43 PM PST
In reply to: So you mean
Popular Forums
icon
Computer Help 47,885 discussions
icon
Computer Newbies 10,322 discussions
icon
iPhones, iPods, & iPads 3,188 discussions
icon
Security 30,333 discussions
icon
TVs & Home Theaters 20,177 discussions
icon
HDTV Picture Setting 1,932 discussions
icon
Phones 15,713 discussions
icon
Windows 7 6,210 discussions
icon
Networking & Wireless 14,510 discussions

Tech for the holiday

Find recipes for July 4 with these foodie apps

The Fourth of July means fireworks, fun and food. If you're planning on a barbecue this weekend, we've got the apps to help you find holiday-inspired recipes.