Camcorders forum

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How to reduce wind noise when recording outside.

by packerfanz / May 21, 2007 9:28 AM PDT

I have a JVC miniDV camcorder with internal microphone. The basically flat microphone inputs sit in front and wrap around to each side of the camera. Is there a way to block or shield the microphone inputs from picking up wind noise? As a follow up, any suggestions for an audio editing program that would maybe have a plug in to reduce wind noise in an audio file.


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generally, the better the source file
by boya84 / May 21, 2007 9:49 AM PDT

whether audio or video, the better anything past that (editing) will be.

So, for your audio issue, what do we have?

When you get an external mic, they typically come with a foam windscreen. They don't work very well for wind noise reduction past about 2-4 mph... For real wind-noise reduction, external mics use a "zepellin" (I've also heard them called a "dead cat"). Basically, a fake-fur "fabric" that causes a dead space between the mic element and the fake fur.

It *might* be possible for you to build a cage around the camcorder where the lens, LCD and whatever else you need to access are still accessible and the mic elements are in that "dead space".

Obviously, if you camcorder has a mic-in jack, the suggestion is use an external mic with a zeppelin wind screen. If there is no mic-in jack and you really are stuck with the built-ins (and this "cover the camcorder mics" does not work or is otherwise not appealing to you), another possibility is to use a small field recorder with an external mic and sync the audio in editing...

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It occurred to me that your camcorder *could*
by boya84 / May 21, 2007 11:30 AM PDT
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New Stick-On WindCutter for Built-in Camcorder Microphones
by LiveProductions / April 17, 2009 1:46 AM PDT

When I got my JVC DV camcorder about five years ago, I was very disappointed with all the wind rumble I was picking up with the little built-in microphone. I searched the web looking for a solution to this problem, and found nothing that really worked. A few weeks ago I discovered a new stick-on fur windscreen and decided to give it a try on my old JVC cam. I was tottally blown away by the results! Finally, someone has come up with a very effective windscreen for small camcorders like mine. The windscreen is called a Stick-On WindCutter. I found it at This thing has cut out 90% of the wind noise I was previously picking up.

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