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How to enable the bass and treble controls in WinXP????

by TimZ / March 8, 2006 7:50 AM PST

Hey everybody,
My work computer won't allow me to change the bass and treble settings within XP. Normally I wouldn't need to for everyday music listening, but the subwoofer is just too loud for an office environment. There is no manual bass control on the speakers or sub, and I can't simply unplug the sub, cuz the speakers run through it. How can I enable the bass control in XP without putting in a better sound card? Or is there another way to turn the bass down so I don't bother my co-workers?
Thanks for any help
Tim

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Where is the sound "card", a chip or a separate
by Ray Harinec / March 8, 2006 8:19 AM PST

card? With drivers there should also be a mixer with those controls. Simply look at programs and find the sound function and hover, possibly you can then open the mixer.

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Tim, Some Audio Devices/Cards Don't Have It
by Grif Thomas Forum moderator / March 8, 2006 9:02 AM PST

f your current audio card doesn't have the option, then you'll need to purchase a new card or get speakers that have a bass/treble adjustment. Even the cheap ones have them currently.. I've got a set at home, purchased for $15.00, which has a bass adjustment knob for the small woofer.

In addition, most media players have an ability to use their equalizer option. For example, RealPlayer has an equalizer in it's "Tools" menu. Windows Media Player 10 also has an equalizer at "Now Playing", "View", "Enhancements".

Hope this helps.

Grif

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Probably not the answer you wanted
by spicetrader / March 9, 2006 7:11 PM PST

You may be trying to solve a social problem with a technical fix. It may be possible in this case. Have you seriously considered the sensibilities of your coworkers? Save your audio lab self-indulgence for home. Get a pair of earphones.

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depends
by ackmondual / March 10, 2006 1:09 AM PST

Subwoofers do make music MUCH MORE noisy than they are. If he has his own office as opposed to a cubicle, points the speakers away from others, and ensures that the sound doesn't get directed to outside loudly or to adjancent offices, he should be fine there

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Suggestion
by pierrot.robert / March 9, 2006 9:43 PM PST

1- Double-click the speaker icon in the system tray
2- Click Options | Advanced controls
3- Below the main volume you could have an Advanced button. Click it and with some sound cards there is a bass/treble control there.

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If you're finding you can't do #1 or #2, read this.....
by ackmondual / March 10, 2006 1:06 AM PST
In reply to: Suggestion

For #1,
if you can't find the Speaker icon in the system try that pieroot.robert is talking about, then do this:

WinXP, start menu --> Settings --> Control Panel
category view: Sounds, Speech, And Audio Device --> Sounds And Audio Device.....

**For future access convenience, in the Volume tab, check Place Volume Icon In Taskbar to put it in the system tray (bottom right for most users)

Volume tab --> click the Advanced button will complete the steps for #1

classic view: Sounds And Audio Device

the rest here is same as from double starred entry above

Win2000, start menu --> Settings --> Control Panel --> Sounds And Multimedia

**For future access convenience, in the Sounds tab, check Show Volume Control On The Taskbar to put it in the system tray (bottom right for most users)

Now you can follow #1 as posted by other poster


.

for #2, Options --> Advanced Controls. Then click on the new Advanced button as described in #2. If either the advanced button itself or the bass/treble settings are grayed out, then I believe your sound card won't let you change these settings from a software level.

Hope this helps

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Opposite Problem: Tone controls greyed out at bottom levels
by grol / October 17, 2008 9:25 AM PDT

What can one do when audio is tinny due to Treble/Bass at minimum levels? Any ideas? STAC 9205 does this. Thanks

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I cannot get default treble and bass on my PC :0(
by sparkey2000 / October 28, 2011 11:48 AM PDT
In reply to: Suggestion

I tried the 3 ideas you gave but my default treble and bass is still faded. I cannot access these options through the sound system on my PC :0(.

Any ideas anyone, please?

Thanks :0)

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CONTRO;S FOR AUDIO
by rudster666 / March 10, 2006 2:12 AM PST

CLICK ON THE SOUND ICON IN YOUR TASKBAR AND ADJUST FROM THERE?

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