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How to download from a Dish DVR?

by rickhart57 / December 15, 2011 3:38 AM PST

I have placed over 100 movies on an external hard drive tht was connected to my Dish DVR. I no longer have Dish sevice and what to be able to access these movies. However, when I connect my laptop to the hard drive, it will not recognize the external drive.

Any help is appreiated!!

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All Answers

Best Answer chosen by rickhart57

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Re: copy from DVR
by Kees_B Forum moderator / December 15, 2011 3:57 AM PST

Yeah, that's what they do to prevent (unauthorized) copying.

What does Windows' Disk Management (how to start it depends on your OS: XP, Vista, 7, so I can't tell the details, just look in the Help and Support or Google it) say about the disk? Probably something like "raw" or "unallocated".

Then there's nothing you can do about it, probably. Having it done by a professional data recovery company (if they would do it) probably would cost more that just buying that 100 movies on DVD.


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Download from a Dish DVR
by rickhart57 / December 15, 2011 5:16 AM PST
In reply to: Re: copy from DVR

Unallocated. I understand the the Dish DVR operates on a Linux based program, but there shouldbe something out there that will allow youto view. I'm not looking to violate copyright laws.

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They do this to make sure you don't.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / December 15, 2011 5:22 AM PST

Please look at what company hosts this site (CBS)
And look at the forum policies.

You may not get the answers you want here.

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Doesn't work anymore
by markmisky / January 26, 2013 1:47 AM PST
In reply to: Re: copy from DVR

I've had my DVD recorder set up for a couple of years like this and a few months ago, it stopped working. All I get is a grey blank screen now. I heard that Dish set up some sort of handshaking system now and outputs must be to an "trusted" device to prevent copying their stuff.
If anyone has a workaround would love to hear about it.

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Wish someone would provide some real help instead of
by Nonconformist2015 / May 18, 2015 5:07 PM PDT
In reply to: Doesn't work anymore

well it just can't be done BS... If someone told most of these responses that they were doomed and all were going to die... would they respond well its policy just have to accept it Never give up if theres a will theres a way.

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This is what is supposed to happen.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / December 15, 2011 3:56 AM PST

The content is locked to the DVR to prevent folk from accessing copyrighted content or copying it out.

Nothing busted. It's working fine.

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Answer to How to download from a Dish DVR
by stevedahl / December 15, 2011 8:57 AM PST

It's been about 4 years since I did this last.
The first thing I did was remove the hard drive from the DVR and I placed it in my Win XP computer.
I downloaded and installed DiskInternals Linux Reader Freeware (
Diskinternals Linux reader let me read the files directly on the DVR drive. I then copied the files from the DVR drive to an NTFS formatted external drive.
The video files on the DVR are not in a standard avi or mpeg format. You will need to install some software to play them or convert them to a standard format. I used a program called Splayer to play the videos I copied from the DVR to the external drive. I downloaded splayer from
Have fun.

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Love your answer you didn't roll over and give up...
by Nonconformist2015 / May 18, 2015 5:12 PM PDT

Just because someone said you cant do it, It can't be done, They made it that way... BS It's data theres a way to read it and I don't think its Rocket Science or impossible to do so. Pitty to most of the answers... They will be the ones that just roll over and die when someone tells them Everyone is going to die there's nothing you can do.

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dvd recorder
by carolpeters / December 15, 2011 9:31 AM PST

just buy a dvd recorder & record the movies you want to easy as can be...

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dvd recorder
by rickhart57 / December 15, 2011 11:01 PM PST
In reply to: dvd recorder

That would work if I still had Dish network. Now I have nothing to even recognze the file format.

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Tipping my hand here.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / December 16, 2011 1:51 AM PST
In reply to: dvd recorder

I have worked with companies on DVR code. The stuff that's inside. The file format is not published and is non-standard to present another hurdle to block the content from being accessed.

Some will not accept this and will lose lots of time trying this. As I know what's going on I write this as a courtesy to you and wish you well but I can't help you any further.

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Wrong answer
by ValB63 / January 22, 2012 1:31 PM PST
In reply to: dvd recorder

I get that piracy is rampant and needs to be prevented. However, that small part of what DVRs are used for should not over ride what if is used for. I had a lot of home movies, grand baby videos, that came up lost because I accidentally reformatted the hard drive instead of the DVD-RW disc I had intended to reformat. It just disgusts me that the industry as a whole would intentionally go out of their way to set it up so that any thing that I record needs to be protected from me!!

If you think there needs to be protection from me, then add a stinking routine to the delete function so that when I select "Delete" on the remote and the selected drive is the hard drive, then prompt me with "Hey Stupid, do you REALLY want to delete your HARD DRIVE"? If I had gotten that response, I probably would have caught it that I was about to delete from the hard drive and not the disk.

Yes, I am fuming because I have just wiped everything off the DVR including home movies that are lost forever.

It was a Panasonic DMR-EH50. The 100GB disk keeps showing up as a zero filled 2TB drive (no partition, nothing).

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DVR recorder to laptop, iPad or disc -- Advice, please!
by GApeach54 / November 9, 2013 2:41 PM PST
In reply to: dvd recorder

Our Directv DVR needs to be replaced because of a faulty fan and subsequent overheating. I PURCHASED all my programs that were recorded & I will keep them if I can transfer them. Directv Customer Service (DCS) says the movies and programs I have stored on the DVR cannot reliably be saved, because:

1. They "don't know how to get the movies off of the DVR..." (unbelievable, right? Sounds like fabrication to me!). They didn't offer to learn or it's a freaking transparent ploy to force more purchases for the replacement DVR. They acted like I was asking for an act of Congress when I asked, "Can I transfer the old DVR playlist to the new DVR? (OMG, UNHEARD OF...). ANSWER: NO!

2. "IF" they could do that.... "IF" IT WAS EVEN POSSIBLE"..."in order to even ATTEMPT such a difficult maneuver, they would have to "send it out" to a special location where they MIGHT be able to do this, but it's too difficult, they Can't Make Any Promises or Guarantees." They MAY or MAY NOT Be Able To Safely Transfer My Programs & movies..." JEEZ-US ON A RAFT....

3. After reading most of the related posts, I am wondering if DSC was just "being inconvenienced" or trying to keep away from obvious pirating OR (my choice...) they really don't know what the hell they're doing!

So can this be done Old DVR ---> New DVR?
Or Old DVR ---> iPad or laptop ---> disc or USB?

Not too familiar with movies & the whole DVR process...but I want to be! Could one of you kind commenters please break this process down into a few critical steps as well as being a bit more specific about what I should use as the transfer medium or peripheral? If so, it sure would be appreciated...thanks, Kim. (I didn't include tech specs because I have a wide variety of HW and SW that might meet specifics) DVR is a DVR, about 1-1/2 yrs old....USB and CD availability doesn't need explaining....but WHICH is better to use? Transfer to laptop, iPad, USB or CDR/ DVD?

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Those DVRs have protected content.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / November 9, 2013 3:04 PM PST

I guess you are still looking for a way to crack into those protections. Please read the forum policies and you see that breaking that code is not up for discussion. Yes, I read you paid but the contract is between you and them and because it's encrypted you see the trouble.

-> Google what a Black Magic HDMI recorder is but also read how it does not record protected content.

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(NT) This old thread is now closed.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / May 19, 2015 12:09 AM PDT
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