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How to boost and repeat my incoming signal

by wproctor.1 / October 10, 2005 2:12 AM PDT

I am receiving wireless signal via linksys router and outside antenna set up in office at RV. Park. I receive the signal at my RV. via Hawking 15dBi Corner Antenna which is outside my window. I brought the wire inside through the window from the corner antenna to a hawking 802.11b/g Adjustable WiFi Signal Booster. This was to send the signal through the air, across the room to my desktop and laptop. I was told by Hawking Tech Support that this would probaly work even tough the Booster was made to connect to the access point instead of the receiving antenna. It doese not seem to work. Can anyone help me with my problem? My antenna has to be at one end of the RV. to receive a signal and computer has to be at other end. The monitor is digital and I can,t get cable long enough if I put cumputer at antenna. If I extend antenna wire it cuts way down on reception.

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How to boost and repeat my incoming signal
by charizmalady2 / April 15, 2008 3:36 AM PDT

I had the same problem, and I had to have a wireless router connected to the phone line at one end of the house to send a signal to my computer in the other end.

One other thing that works, is that you might have to get a 40 foot ethernet wire, and connect it to the wireless rounter to the computer, to get the signal to your computer, which is a pain.

Or if other people around you have wireless routers, then all you need is a pc card to pick up the signal, but then we need to boost that, if the signal is low. This is the problem I am having now, I am recieving low and no connectivity signals, but can't use them since they are not strong enough. So somehow I need to boost those signals to get them to my computer for free internet.

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WiFi Network- Boosted
by Ankit B. / April 16, 2008 9:13 PM PDT

1. Reposition your router (or access point) to avoid obstructions and radio interference. Both reduce the range of WiFi network equipment. Common sources of interference in residences include brick or plaster walls, microwave ovens, and cordless phones. Additionally, consider changing the WiFi channel number on your equipment to avoid interference.

2. Upgrade the antenna on your router (or access point). WiFi antennas on most wireless base stations can be removed and replaced with more powerful ones.

3. Add another access point (or router). Large residences typically require no more than two APs, whereas businesses may employ dozens of APs. In a home, this option requires connecting your primary wireless router (access point) to the second one with Ethernet cable; home wireless routers and/or APs don't normally communicate with each other directly.

4. Add a bi-directional WiFi signal amplifier to wireless devices as needed. A WiFi signal amplifier (sometimes called "signal booster") attaches to a router, access point or Wi-Fi client at the place where the antenna connects. Bi-directional antennas amplify the wireless signal in both transmit and receive directions. These should be used as WiFi transmissions are two-way radio communications.

5. Add a WiFi repeater. A wireless repeater is a stand-alone unit positioned within range of a wireless router (access point). Repeaters (sometimes called "range expanders") serve as a two-way relay station for WiFi signals. Clients too far away from the original router / AP can instead associate with the WLAN through the repeater

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