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How much do YOU pay for Broadband?

by boringcom / May 9, 2006 3:05 AM PDT

I will be making a call on my telecom provider in late June and it got me wondering what the price spectrum for broadband is. I pay Videotron (Cable):

Price per month: $56 CDN ($63.03 USD) tax included
Service: 5.1 megabit down, 0.9 Mb up, 20 GB down, 10 GB up

The local DSL alternative would be $44.86 CDN ($50.40 USD) for a maximum of 5 Mb down, up not specified.

So how much do you pay?

- Micah

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NS
by pkscout / May 9, 2006 3:37 AM PDT

I'm paying $32.70 a month from Verizon. It's $37.95 a month plus $2.75 a month FUSF recovery fee MINUS $8 a month discount for a one year commitment.

That gives me 3Mbps down and 768Kpbs up.

It's really sad that in Japan and many European countries that price would get me 100Mbps connection. Sad

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Europe Broadband Rocks
by Chris_Fon / May 9, 2006 5:09 AM PDT
In reply to: NS

In Sweden, you can get 100Mbps broadband for pennies (not literally)

Sadly in the UK, you can get up to 24Mbps broadband for about

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It pains me
by eugenep01 / May 9, 2006 3:18 PM PDT
In reply to: Europe Broadband Rocks

My horrendous service provider is NTC Communications, I pay around $45.00 a month for broadband (which is supplied through a direct Ethernet port in my apartment). It would be more if I didn?t get a bundle of phone, cable, and broadband service.

Speed has been dropped from 3.xMbps in August to 1.2Mbps, upload dropped from 2.54Mbps to ~700Kbps. I am also plagued with multipe outages a week, anywhere from a minute or two, to several hours.
*Apartment complexes in my area get a 12% commission from NTC to make them the only ISP available outside of dial-up.

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Ooof - CRTC = High Prices
by boringcom / May 9, 2006 11:25 PM PDT
In reply to: It pains me

Thanks for the feedback folks.

I guess I'm getting the shaft in a major way - though I won't complain about outages and throughput usually matches the service they claim to provide for the price.

Looks like I'm pay close to 2x the U.S. price though. Okay, maybe 1.8. Still, the Canadian Radio and Television Communication folks are not helping me out by putting any pressure on these near monopolies.

So much for a free market driving down market prices, though I guess if I'm willing to pay they're going to charge at that level... Sigh.

- Micah

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Its a thin line...
by ddubb / May 19, 2006 12:40 AM PDT

...between "monopoly" and "near monopoly", isn't it? Really all you need is one other choice. I don't think its the CRTC's job to drive down prices, is it? How can you say, "so much for free market forces driving down prices" and with no more than a comma in between then say "I guess if I'm willing to pay they're going to charge at that level".

I think a complete definition of "free market" would include something about companies charging no more and no less than what the market will bear. Somewhere in Canada there are people who refuse to subscribe to broadband until the price becomes more reasonable. Now who's to blame for keeping prices high? Every customer who rewards the free market forces for charging so much.

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(NT) (NT) who is your provided?
by rosscbrown / May 10, 2006 12:07 AM PDT
In reply to: Europe Broadband Rocks
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Im gonna assume you mean provider
by Chris_Fon / May 12, 2006 11:46 PM PDT

My ISP is Wanadoo

4 DAYS TILL 8Meg ADSL!!!!!

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(NT) (NT) oh ok
by rosscbrown / May 14, 2006 11:08 PM PDT
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How are lower prices possible?
by ddubb / May 18, 2006 7:20 PM PDT
In reply to: Europe Broadband Rocks

I live in the city limits of Madison, WI, the state's capitol. I have satellite tv service so my broadband is dsl. But the old copper wires allow no more than about 550 kbps down and 250 up. Packaged with unused barebones residential phone service (I don't even own a telephone) my bill is about $22/mo.

How did europeans upgrade and how do they get higher level service for so cheap? If their pipeline was at all subsidized by tax revenues then I'd rather have lower taxes and have internet improvements be paid for by internet consumers.

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??
by Chris_Fon / May 26, 2006 9:59 PM PDT

I honestly dunno how we get such fast bband if thats the spec for copper wires. All I know is that the most prominent bband in the UK is ADSL and they can currently get up to 8meg by this method. DSL services in the UK come from as little as

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Prices In South Korea
by jagacbe / May 10, 2006 12:36 AM PDT

I don't know the exact specs for the VDSL, but I konw it's fast as heck and it's about $49.00US and the regular cable modem is about $22 and ADSL is about $33

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Fiber in Utah
by adkinsjm / May 10, 2006 4:15 AM PDT
In reply to: Prices In South Korea

$40/month for 10mb down/up. No bandwidth caps.

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Too much for too little
by punterjoe / May 10, 2006 8:58 AM PDT

I have Verizon DSL in a very old house in a very old city. The junction box in my basement is cloth-clad copper & thumbscrews! I pay about $80 to verizon for DSL/phone bundle. My throughput varies drastically - I'm guessing, since I don't keep an always-on connection, it can be anywhere from 1.8Mpbs dn/300k up to nearly too slow to measure - CNET's bandwidth meter once clocked it at 2300Bps - other times it just times out. I'm guessing most of the hardware between my DSL modem & the C.O. about 2mi away is probably over 75yrs old. Heck, when I moved to town in the 80s I had to 'special order' touchtone svc! Still, I refuse to deal with the cable co (old grudge/long story). If someone comes up with a better way to get broadband, I'll be quite receptive.

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My DSL Connection
by AndyInTN / May 10, 2006 1:00 PM PDT

Price:

$65 month

Speed:

I ran this from an online speed test service, the numbers are usually about the same, sometimes varying by a few bits.

Download Speed: 1018 kbps (127.3 KB/sec transfer rate)
Upload Speed: 279 kbps (34.9 KB/sec transfer rate)

Unfortunately where I live we can't get cable connections or cable tv for that matter.

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comcast $60
by decjr / May 10, 2006 1:12 PM PDT

$60 provided by Comcast Cable in Fremont, CA; according to the speed test from www.dslreports.com:

4036 / 266
Your download speed : 4036 kbps or 504.5 KB/sec.
That is 19.6% worse than an average user on comcast.net
Your upload speed : 266 kbps or 33.3 KB/sec.
That is 33.8% worse than an average user on comcast.net

turtle-ing in fremont,
g

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$25/month for 3mpbs upload and download
by archaeo1 / May 10, 2006 2:39 PM PDT

Gotta love college internet, fast and cheap.

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Re: How much do YOU pay for Broadband?
by mattmoris / May 11, 2006 7:17 AM PDT

I'm on a retention plan from Rogers in Canada for the next 6 months.

24.99/month for 6mbps down/800kbps up.

All I have to do is call them in 6 months and if they don't give me a lower price than 47.99/month, I will switch to their competitor who gives the first 3 months for 9.99/month and 29.99/month thereafter.

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High Speed?
by HD1080p / May 13, 2006 2:01 AM PDT

Well I pay about $45:00 Canadian for "Unlimited download"
Usual speed is around 4820kbps UP and around 485kbps DOWN. This seems to be adequate for my needs and is, I think, a fair price. Plus we get really good support.

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Re: High Speed?
by boringcom / May 15, 2006 2:47 AM PDT
In reply to: High Speed?

Interesting. Which provider?

I pay $56 Canadian, tax-in, for capped downloads and uploads (20 GB down, 10 GB up), 5.1 Mbps down (I've seen sustained downloads at 590 KBps ~= 4720 Kbps) and 900 Kpbs up. (Montreal; Videotron)

Who's you're provider and where are you located?

Micah

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Broadband in The Bahamas
by icarus242 / May 13, 2006 4:14 AM PDT

I pay $55.70 per month flat fee, for unlimited usage. I get 768 kb/s upload speeds and 3 MB/s download speeds plus 6 free e-mail accounts. This is from the local cable TV company which means that you also have to get cable TV at $37 per month.

Dante

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too much
by firestarter / May 15, 2006 12:20 AM PDT

i pay comcast $46.00 pluse a 3 fee to rent the cable modem from them and i get 6mb down and not sure how much upload.

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Comcast
by xfile102 / May 19, 2006 1:32 AM PDT

I get ripper off for $79.99/month for 8.1 megabit down, 1.5Mb Up, and 10GB Down for Newsgroups, which goes waaayyy to fast, forcing me to use Giganews.

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Reply to How much do YOU pay for Broadband?
by drhamad / May 26, 2006 11:12 PM PDT

i pay $19.95CND for 5mb down and 512kb up DSL. its one of those six month deals then they jack up the price to $37.50CND.

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Brazil's Virtua
by cars4less201 / May 26, 2006 11:23 PM PDT

I'm paying R$149 (Around US$70) for a 8MB down 0.5MB up.

I can download 60GB a month and upload as much as I want.

If I download more than 60GB my speed goes to 200kbps until the end of the month.

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Hawaii Broadband Services
by mike_quesnel / May 27, 2006 11:18 AM PDT

I live here in Hawaii and so there are two main broadband services, Roadrunner cable and Hawaiiantel dsl. I have Hawaiiantel dsl. I pay about $30 for 3mb down, and about 748kb up.

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wrong connversions....
by awinn233 / May 27, 2006 11:33 AM PDT

You must be using the wrong rates for CDN to USD becasue $56 CDN is around $50 USD.

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Arnet in Argentina
by SantiagoCrespo / May 27, 2006 12:12 PM PDT

Charges USD $35 for 2.5mb down & 256k up, 10 gigabytes monthly transfer (USD .30 per aditional GB).
5mb down and 768k up is 50 bucks

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Comcast cable $48.00
by merrybrown / May 27, 2006 12:37 PM PDT

Cable speeds are not consistent.
I think DSL is less, but no other alternative.
Really wish I knew if Earthlink was less expensive ... heh heh heh

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Verizon Wireless EV-DO 40USD/mo
by robstak / May 28, 2006 8:57 AM PDT

...Tethered the laptop. Only prob is that EV-DO is only in a couple places; here at the cape im lucky to get 200kbps.

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$60, 2meg down, 128 up, 10Gb Capped
by Redhats Q / May 28, 2006 2:08 PM PDT

I thought we were bad

Now Its confirmed

The use of data caps on broadband internet accounts in New Zealand is out of step with most of the OECD, according to a report released today. The Internet Society of New Zealand (InternetNZ) released the report which compares OECD broadband markets. The report, prepared by Wairua Consulting, analysed 2,586 broadband packages from 26 OECD countries, on a range of indicators including download and upload speeds, costs, data caps, variety of offerings, contention ratios and finally an overall ranking table. New Zealand ranked fifth from the bottom at 22nd.

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